Village Coordinator Reports 2008

Villages A-F

| A | B | C D | E | F |

Villages G-L

| G | H | J | K | L |

Villages M-R

| M | N | O | P | R |

Villages S-Z

| S | T | V | W | Y | Z |

VC Newsletter Editor Michael Frank


 

  • Ährenfeld / Aehrenfeld, Saratov, Volga
    2008 Village Report for Kratzke & Ährenfeld

    2008 has been an active year for those researching families from the Volga German colonies of Kratzke and Ährenfeld.  I don't track exact statistics of inquiries, but there have been on average two or three each week.  The website of these colonies, http://www.berschauer.com/Genealogy/index2.html, continues to receive 50-75 hits per week.

    Surnames from Kratzke include: Bender, Berschauer, Blehm, Boxberger, Deines, Dietz, Fabrizius, Gideon, Grohs, Jäger, Knaus, Koleber, Krug, Mai, Maier/Meier, Michaelis, Müller, Schäfer, Schneider, Schröder, Schwien, & Templing.

    There have been no new "German origins" found this year for Kratzke families.

    The largest number of new contacts with researchers is coming from Germany and Russia.  Thanks to the efforts of Hugh Lichtenwald (on the farm in South Carolina), there have been several "famine letters" translated that are either from or mention families in Kratzke.

    Passenger ship lists have been located for several immigrant families.

    There has been a lot of work connecting extended families from other colonies:  Deines from Dönhof, Rosenheim, Franzosen, and Norka; Blehm from Shcherbakovka and Dobrinka.  The newly available censuses for Dobrinka (1834, 1850, and 1857) have been very helpful in this regard.

    I enjoyed seeing wonderful family and friends at the AHSGR/GRHS Conference in Casper!

    That's it for 2008.

    Brent Mai

    Village Coordinator for Kratzke and Ährenfeld

 

  • Alexanderfeld, North Caucasus

 

  • Alexandertal (Neu-Schilling), Saratov, Volga

    2008 Village Coordinator Report for Alexandertal

    This year I heard from three Alexandertal descendants.  I had not heard from them before. Thanks to the work of my cousin Brent Mai, an error in the translation of the 1857-58 census that Professor Pleve did for me way back when, was discovered.  Pleve had left out a young Kraus.  That young man later came to this country and I had been confused about who he was ever since 1960! I created a nice little pamphlet on Alexandertal which we used at the Casper convention.  Judging how quickly it kept disappearing from our table, it was well received.

    Since I spend most of my time working on the German Origins project, I thought it would be fun to see what could be said about the origins of the families in the first Alexandertal census (1858).  I have translations of most of the relevant available censuses.  The task is foreshortened by the fact that no First Settlers' List that I know of has yet been found for Schilling.  These early Alexandertal lines have been traced back as far as is indicated: Beisel (Schilling 1798), Daniel (Schilling 1775), Haas (Schilling 1798), Helzer ("Hessen"), Hoffmann (Isenburg), Koch (Darmstadt), Kraus (Thuengen Barony), Krel and Maul (Schilling 1775), Reil (Gelnhausen?), Satler/Sattler (Isenburg), Schmidt (Schilling 1798), Schreiber, Schulz and Sinner (Schilling 1775), Steher (Kurpfalz), Vorster/Worster (Schilling 1775), Weinberg (Schilling 1798).

    Unfortunately the Alexandertal website has not been updated in some time. I built and updated the site using FrontPage software.  My computer died and I find that the operating system (Vista) will not run FrontPage.  So far I have found no replacement for FrontPage which is user-friendly enough for me to use.  If anyone has a good suggestion, please let me know.  That is it for 2008.

    Dick Kraus

    Village Coordinator for Alexandertal

 

  • Alt-Danzig, Kirovograd
    2008 Village Report for Alt Danzig

    The village of Danzig was established in 1787 near the Russian city of Elisabethgrad in the Kirovograd district by a group of individuals who had migrated to Russia from in and near the Prussian city of Danzig.   In 1842, the village was renamed Alt Danzig with the founding of the daughter colony Neu Danzig.

    I don't remember of any inquiries this year for families from this village.

    Curt Renz
    Village Coordinator for Alt Danz

     

  • Alt-Schilling Saratov, Volga

 

  • Alt-Schwedendorf, Swedish Colonies, Nikolaev and Kherson
    2008 Old Swedish Villages Report

    Villages of Alt-Schwedendorf, Mühlhausendorf, Schlangendorf, and Klosterdorf.

     I received inquiries on family names of Buch, Meier, Rexin, Oppenlaender, Hein, Specht within the villages and with the help of fellow researchers of these villages have helped them to further their research.

    I have also received inquiries from a university student in Ukraine who is interested in researching the history of these villages since it is still an unresearched topic to this day.  The University of Alberta has also recently embraced this area's unique history which can be found in English on www.svenskbyborna.com under Canadian.   Jörgen Hedman has written the story from a Swedish viewpoint but the German experience is still the same.

    These villages represent a unique diaspora that are a crossover of cultures and, as a result, have been, by the large part, rejected, by the Swedes and Germans alike because they do not fit into either ethnic group.

    I had an inquiry about a mailing list for a newsletter but since these colonies have not had a coordinator for so long, and the villages are so small, and the Germans have not been resident in the villages for so many years, there are very few inquiries.

    I was mistaken about attending the German Lutheran Church in Mühlhausendorf in 2007, it was actually in Schlangendorf.  There is only one German family that lives in the village today.  They were banned from returning to this area when the German army rescued them in 1944/1945 and took them to camps in Poland.  It is very possible that the church will close in the coming years.

    I have written a book about the immigration of the villagers from the Swedish villages to North America between 1889 and 1931.  It traces their genealogy and pioneer history and can be ordered at www.swedesincanada.net.

    My great-uncle's memoirs about his life in the village from 1900-1929 is now complete and will be posted on the Svenskbyborna-Canadian website in January 2009.

    I continue to dedicate time to SOAR as my time permits.

    Respectfully submitted,
    Karen Wright

    Village Coordiator for Alt-Schwedendorf, Mühlhausendorf, Schlangendorf and Klosterdorf

     

  • Amilchin (Emilchin, Emilcin, Amilcin) Volhynia,
    Ukraine, Russia

 

  • Anton, Saratov, Volga
    2008 Village Report for Anton

    There were a few inquiries for Anton this year.  Most of my Anton e-mail was with German relatives in Germany.

    This past June, I traveled to Germany to visit some of my ancestral villages.

    Thanks to all the research by accredited genealogists in the AHSGR organization, I was able to look up the villages where my German-Russian ancestors lived before they migrated to Russia.  This was a very exciting experience to realize that after several hundred years, I had returned to my "roots".  Because of previous emails to relatives in Germany, I was also able to meet my German Russian relatives from Anton and several other villages.

    I am still compiling the information I have on Anton to turn into a manuscript, much like the one I wrote, "Kukkus, a German Village on the Volga".  In the meantime, if anyone would like to be the Anton Village Coordinator please let Lincoln Headquarters know, as I will be resigning my position next year to devote my time to my family history.

    Betty Engel Muradian
    Anton Village Coordinator

     

  • Balzer, Saratov, Volga
    2008 Annual Report for Balzer

    This has been a productive year for the Balzer research group.  

    I attended the Casper Convention where many of us met for the first time and I also met new researchers.  Cathy Reilly, then recently returned from a trip to Russia, gave a wonderful presentation of Balzer today.   She and her sister Karlene brought back many items that they had purchased or received in Balzer.

    Most interesting is a set of work cards from one of the textile factories that dates back to before the 1917 Revolution.  These cards list the name of the employee, name of employee's father and various comments made during their time of employment.

    The Isenburg church record book sold very well, considering it has a limited realm of interest.  Research into German origins expanded into the Kurpfalz area for the first time.  Initial finds were encouraging. Thanks to Dick Kraus, an expanded talk about this topic will be presented at the 2009 convention.

    Darrell Weber had 12 inquires about Balzer in 2008.  In terms of projects, he is starting with the families listed in Pleve (1767) and connecting them with the names in Mai (1798).  He then will try to connect them to the 1857 Mai census of Balzer.   We are really lucky to have all the census information for Balzer.  In some cases Darrell is working back to Germany using Bonner's (2007) information on the villages in Germany.

    Two issues of the Balzer/Moor newsletter have been sent out this year to about 60 researchers.   We expect to send out one more issue before the end of the year.   There have been several hits on the website both from the United States and abroad.

    Wayne Bonner

    Village Coordinator for Balzer

     

  • Bangert, Samara, Volga
    2008 Report for the Village of Bangert


    I have received two inquires this past year for the village of Bangert.  The database continues to grow and now has over 5,000 entries.  The presentation of the German Brotherhood was given at the Casper
    Convention and the people from Bangert were very much a part of this religious movement.  Copies of this home life were added to the Bangert file in Lincoln, Nebraska.
     
    I keep a list of all the inquiries, along with their e-mail addresses and when an inquiry comes in for which I don't have much information, I can send along another person's e-mail for that person to check. It works.
     
    The Volgograd reservoir was filled from 1958 until 1961. This means that construction began a few years earlier.  The village (called Russian Zaumorye) is located 1 or 2 kilometers away from the original position after some houses were brought to a higher place. A big part of the original Bangert is now under water.
     
    The people of Bangert went to milk cows by boat.  In the spring, cows were brought to the islands, near the village, and stayed there until the end of the season.  The boat was rowed to the island in the morning and evening for the milking.
     
    Paul Koehler

    Village Coordinator for Bangert

     

  • Bergdorf, Glückstal, Odessa, Kherson

 

  • Borodino, Bessarabia
    2008 Village Report for Borodino/Bess

    This year has been a difficult one for those who were giving me information because my house has been under construction and we're still not finished.

    However,   all the kind and considerate people have promised to contact me again.  There is always a large number of new additions, corrections, etc. to be accomplished.   I probably have fifty or more people waiting for me to add their family data.

    All my information is placed on my public web site.   Perhaps this is why so many people can contact me.    If I can avoid it, I do not charge anything.     All of this is coming out of my pocket.   Of course, if the stock market doesn't bounce back up my pocket won't be as deep.

    Take care everyone.

    Judy A. Remmick-Hubert
    Village Coordinator for Borodino/ Bess

     

  • Brunnental, Samara, Volga
    2008 Village Report for Brunnental (Brunnenthal)

    This year we've had many inquiries.  We heard from several Hergert families just this past week.  I also made an important discovery for a fellow from Russia, Viktor Seibel.  You might remember the story of his grandfather who came to the United States alone, leaving his wife and children in Brunnental,
    hoping that he would be able to make money and then send them over at a later time.  This never happened, and he lived alone in Washington State, while his family lived in Russia.  Viktor was searching for any information on this grandfather, Adam Seibel.  Well, just this last week I found the death record and exactly where he was buried and passed on this long-awaited information to Viktor Seibel in Russia!

    I continue to search daily to expand my research on each family from Brunnental.  I am trying to search each of the following items to round out the family information:


       1) US Federal Census -- 1900/1910/1920/1930
       2) Passenger Lists  - some new info has been added!!
       3) WWI Draft Registrations -- more new ones added!!
       4) WWII Enlistment Records
       5) Public Records
       6) SSDI or other state death indexes
       7) Obituaries
       8) Photographs - Lots of new photos!!
       9) Family stories
      10) Naturalization Records
      11) Burial records
      12) Canadian Census Reports -  1901 & 1911  NEW INFO
      13) Marriages (some certificates give parents names)

    I want to say that I feel sometimes that I have "exhausted" all sources, but then I find a brand new family that I didn't have in my growing database of 55,948 individuals.  This excites me and spurs me on to "search for more families".

    PASSENGER LISTS / WWI DRAFT REGISTRATIONS
    I've also put together a comprehensive report which contain the Passenger List data by date of arrival and then also the WWI Draft Registrations for all those from Brunnental by last name alphabetically. These two reports can be found on our website:
        1)  Passenger Lists by year -
              http://www.brunnental.us/brunnental/passeng.html
        2) WWI Draft Registrations by last name -
              http://www.brunnental.us/brunnental/ww1draftregistration.html


    BRUNNENTAL LISTSERV:
    We also have a listserv, where we can send an email, which goes to everyone who has "subscribed" to the Listserv.  Directions on how to join can be found on our webpage.  This is one way we are able to communicate easily with everyone from our village who has email. One single email does it all.  I try to send out new information such as obituaries or new ship list data, or anything else that is important to people.

    We are trying to add new obituaries as we find them, and we post those on our listserv, so anyone who is interested in this information should JOIN our listserv:
         Send an email to: RUS-SAMARA-BRUNNENTAL-L-request@rootsweb.com  with the
    word "subscribe" (without the quotes) on the subject line.


         Or check out our website at:  http://www.brunnental.us/brunnental/


         You can also browse through the past postings to the Brunnental LISTSERV on Rootsweb, so it's a great place to make contacts and get the village name out there:
                 http://archiver.rootsweb.com/th/index/RUS-SAMARA-BRUNNENTAL/

    NEW RECORDS:
          I've discovered a wonderful collection online for records in Washington State and have been working daily to extract marriages, naturalizations, deaths, etc.  The address is:
          http://www.digitalarchives.wa.gov/


    These records often give parents’ names or other valuable information.  This has come in handy while researching the Adlers, Linkers, Beckers, Gutwigs, Hartungs, Brehms, Seibels, Bretthauers, Ehlenbergers, and others.  Remember that many marriages from Oregon took place in Vancouver, Clark County,
    Washington.  Many marriages can be found at this site, which cover both states.

    THANKS TO OTHER VCs:
    I want to also thank all of the village coordinators who have shared new records or helped me with my research for Brunnental.  I email often with Doris Evans, VC for Frank, Russia and also shared records with Michael Frank, the VC from Kautz Russia.

    I appreciate the spirit of sharing that continues in AHSGR!

    Sherrie (Gettman) Stahl

    Village Coordinator for Brunnental

     

  • Many of you are probably not too familiar with the village of Chasselois (aka Chaisel or Schasselwa). Here is a short history of this Village which was destroyed in 1771.

    Among the Volga German villages established along the Big and Little Karaman rivers on the wiesenseite of the Volga, the village of Chasselois was a neighboring village to Mariental, and Louis, among others.  These villages were being established in and about the year 1767.  This land – the Volga Steppes, had been the land where the Kirghis were always able to freely roam and move their herds of cattle and horses around the country in their nomadic lifestyle.  When they found these strangers inhabiting their
    land, with permanent structures to live in, they, with their strong sense of possession, did not hesitate to challenge them by raiding their villages, pillaging, raping, kidnapping, and destroying everything in sight.  They felt they had to destroy these people for their own survival.  They discovered that these strangers had (by their standards) a wealth of desirable goods such as tools, implements, wagons, firearms, utensils, clothing, leather goods, scissors , cutlery, needles, books, buttons, and many other items that the Kirghiz had never seen.  They knew they could seize these treasures, and also kidnap the many men, women, and children who would bring the highest prices in the eastern slave markets.  In
    August, 1771, Kirghiz raiding parties struck Chasselois and Louis, the two farthest inland, while most of their inhabitants were in the fields harvesting severely reduced crops shriveled by another summer of
    drought.

    Louis had been settled by only 50 families, but the Chasselois population figure had not yet been recorded.  Information about this raid is meager except that it was executed by no more than 50 or 60 riders.  Chasselois was totally destroyed in this raid (according to one report) and the inhabitants
    who escaped capture found refuge in nearby Louis, Mariental and neighboring colonies.

    I have actually had communications on Chasselois during this year.  One communication was from my cousin who found two other Schoenberger"s (Matthias, and Peter) which I didn't have on my list.  It is always interesting to hear from someone whose ancestors were living in Chasselois at one time.

    Thelma Mills

    VC for Mariental, Louis, Chasselois

     

  • Dinkel, Saratov, Volga
    2008 Report for the Village of Dinkel (Tarlyakovka)

    I have received and answered six to eight inquiries about the village.  I sent a 20-page history of the village to Ray Heinle and he made a booklet and copies which he placed on the Volga table at the convention.  Any leftover copies were taken back by Headquarters.  I wish to thank Ray and Sharon White for taking the time and energy to help me by sending material and names of the people of the village.  I have 700-800 names and am still adding data to the files.

    Leroy Nikolaisen

    Dinkel Village Coordinator

     

  • Dobrinka, Saratov, Volga
    2008 Annual Report for Dobrinka

    The 1834, 1850 and 1857 census data has been added to the Dobrinka database which now has records for about 9000 people, 2700 familes and 37,000 data entries.  I am in the process of auditing the census entries, adding additional family number information, and adding information for people who moved from Dobrinka to other colonies in 1852 and 1857.

    The Dobrinka Mailing list has been fairly active this past year, with over 75 messages sent to the mailing list.  Besides numerous queries from the US, there have also been queries from Germany, Argentina and Russia.

    I received pictures of the current village of Dobrinka from someone in Russia, and they have been added to the Dobrinka web site.  Dobrinka is part of the Lower Volga Village Project.  I maintain the website for that project.

    Gary Martens

    Dobrinka Village Coordinator

     

  • Dönhof, Saratov, Volga
    2008 Report for Donhof/Doenhof/Donhoff

    I have had several surname requests for Donhof for 2008 and am working on research for some of the requests at the present time.  I am continuing to update the obituary file and to compile family and history information on Donhof.  This includes updating family information for Donhof surnames, as well as having those related surnames from other villages that married into Donhof families.

    I have added the 1834 and 1857 census records for Donhof to my files.

    We are continuing to research and add data for the original Peace Lutheran Church building that we now own and have had service with members from the current Peace Lutheran church in our old building.  More services may be planned for the coming year.  This church building is the original building built by German/Russian settlers in 1906 in the Sterling, Colorado area and was the first German speaking church in Sterling.  I have copies of the original church records and have an
    ongoing project of translating them into book form.  Though this is not a specific Donhof project, it does involve many German/Russian immigrants from several villages in Russia.  Northeastern Colorado has many descendants from these original immigrants.

    Karen Kaiser
    Co-Cordinator for Donhof

     

  • Dreispitz, Saratov, Volga
    2008 Report for Dreispitz

    Dreispitz is a colony located in the Saratov Province, in the district of Kamyshin, on the Bergseite, along the Dobrinka River.  It is 150 versta from Saratov, 30 from Kamyshin, 15 from the main road to Astrakhan, 5 from Holstein, 11 from Dobrinka, and 6 from the dock.
     
    This has been a busy year for Dreispitz researchers.  Numerous inquiries have been received from several states, namely Germany, Argentina, and Canada.  I was able to furnish information or direct them to other sources.

    Families researched for Dreispitz  are: Deal, Diel, Heinze, Herbel, Keller, Klein, Kraft, Langhofer, Meier, Schwemmer, Steinert, Steinle, Vogel, Weber, Nusz and others.    The Dreispitz Census for 1834, 1850, and 1858, were great in connecting the families, many of which are related within the village.  I suggested they purchase all or part of the Driespitz Census.

    Inquiries were received from researchers that, unknown to them, were related to me.  They were from both the Heinze and the Steinle sides of my family, and were very surprised when I told them that we were cousins.  This resulted in exchanging many emails, letters, and pictures.  We all benefited.

    I was elated, as well as several other researchers, to purchase the recent translated Census for  Dobrinka for the years 1834, 1850, and 1857.  Thank you to the Lower Volga Village Project, Prof. and Mrs. Brent Mai, and Peter Schantz.   Many of the families in Dreispitz lived in Dobrinka before moving on to Dreispitz.

    I am making more and more connections with the Heinze family.  Some time ago I had purchased the Heinze Census from Teresa Helzer, VC for Oberdorf.  From the Dobrinka Census I was able to connect the families.  The first Heinze Family arrived in the colony of Dobrinka on June 9, 1764.  Some of the Heinze's remained in Dobrinka.  Two sons of Johannes Georg Heinze moved to Oberdorf in 1852.  Other Heinze families moved to Dreispitz.   This is based on the contents of the 1798 Census.

    Approximately 600 obituaries collected between December and May were added to the Lower Volga Village Project, and furnished to the SOAR project.   Approximately another 800 obituaries have been accumulated, and will be added to these projects by January 1, 2009.

    I did not attend the International Convention in Casper, Wyoming.  However, I did furnish information and pamphlets for Dreispitz to Village Coordinator Ron Burkett, who prepared a display for the Lower Volga Colonies.  I have been told that he did an excellent job.

    An index was prepared of the family Households of Dreispitz in the 1798 Census.  It has been placed in the Village Coordinator File.  I also included in the file a list of the materials that I have in my own files.

    I continue my volunteer work in the library for the AHSGR Golden Wheat Chapter.  I also volunteer one Tuesday afternoon a month in the Midwest Historical and Genealogical Library.  I attended a Seminar pertaining to Heritage Quest, a research tool, free to all Kansas residents.   I also attended another Seminar for a resource guide in German Gothic handwriting, the old German type and handwriting, the old German alphabet, script, and the Sutterlin alphabet, which is useful in reading German church records, obituaries, and newspaper articles.

    My plans are to continue the connections with the Heinze Family and with the Steinle Family.   The 2008 year has been so busy helping researchers that I have not been able to work on my own genealogy.  There are many connections yet to be made.

    Rachel E. Smith
    Village Coordinator for Dreispitz
    and Chairman of the LowerVolga Obituary Project

     

  • Eigenfeld, North Caucasus

 

  • Enders, Samara, Volga

 

  • Erlenbach, Saratov, Volga
    2008 Village Report for Erlenbach

    The Erlenbach website has been on-line for nearly one year now, and during that time I've received quite a few queries.  Because of the close proximity with Oberdorf and Unterdorf and the movement of people between these villages, many of the same surnames are found in all three of these villages.  Teri Helzer has often shared her Oberdorf queries with me, and I find myself sharing my Erlenbach queries with her because of the surname overlap and because she is always helpful.

    Not all of my inquiries were about Erlenbach or its families.  I was, however, able to redirect those people to other Village Coordinators or other websites and resources.

    Heide Becker Langenbeck
    Erlenbach Village Co-coordinator

     

  • Fischer, Saratov, Volga

 

  • Friedensdorf

    2008 Villiage Report for Friedensdorf

    Friedensdorf was one of the many small villages located within the greater Mennonite settlements known as the Molochna/Molotoschna colony, so named for the proximity to the Molochna (milk) River in what is the present day Ukraine.  (It also happens to be the village from which I trace my ancestors.)  From the modern-day reports and pictures I have seen, there is little that now remains of this village.

    I have had no inquiries and have received no new information this past year.

    John Scott Niessen

    Friedensdorf Village Coordinator

     

  • Friedrichsfeld, North Caucasus

 

  • Galka
    2008 Annual Report for the Village of Galka

    The Village of Galka has very little activity.  I have had two queries in the past 12 months.

    Gary Martens and I have worked together on birth records from the Volgograd Archives to answer questions on the Bernhardt line in Galka post 1857.   We are trying to sort out the Bernhardt line in Argentina. 

    Gary Schneider

    Galka Village Coordinator

     
  • Glückstal Colonies Research Association
    Glückstal Colonies Village Report - 2008

    Researching the villages of Glückstal, Neudorf, Bergdorf and Kassel and their daughter colonies in South Russia
     
    This has been another exciting year for the Glückstal Colonies Research Association.  During the joint convention in Casper of the Germans from Russia, we presented "The Glückstal of New Russia, the Soviet Union, and North America."  We celebrated with a book signing on two consecutive days.  The book has been well received, and is available from AHSGR, GRHS, GRHC and from GCRA. 

    Since this is our ninth book, we continue to learn about deadlines and other production requirements. Our 2008 book, of 768 pages, details wide-ranging research of the Black Sea region beyond the Glückstal Colonies, discusses time spent in Poland and Hungary en route to the Glückstal Colonies, gives an extensive list of those arrested and shot during the terror years of 1937-38, and includes a discussion of the routes taken to Russia based on available documentary evidence.  Several stories of the trek and subsequent banishment were translated and included, as well as the enforced service of one of our people by the Communists, two biographies from the South Dakota Archives, memories of special ancestors like grandmothers, and a story of a quilt that made it back to Eureka, South Dakota, after being found in a dumpster in a neighboring state.  The DVD included with the book has updated points of origin, all the post 1885 church records that have been purchased by GCRA to date, more EWZ records, associated GEDCOMS of family research, and much more.  The "GCRA Team" is pleased to make so much information available to the GR community.  Please see our website for further information on all our publications and purchasing details. 

    The group continues to publish the "GCRA Newsletter" twice annually, with 64 pages of research information and news available to our members.  The newsletter has now been published for twenty-one years, a total of 42 issues. The GCRA team met during the convention and made plans for further projects and articles.  There was much research, as in 2004, that could not be completed in time to meet the publication deadlines.  There are many original documents that still need to be purchased, and research waiting to be completed and shared with our members and the Germans from Russia community.

    The group meeting during the convention was a give-and-take discussion for the participants and ran overtime. 

    Our GCRA Listserve is available to members of the group and is managed by Michael Miller at North Dakota State University. 

    Submitted by Margaret Freeman and Homer Rudolf 

     

  • Gnadenfeld, (Neu-Moor/Moor), Samara, Volga
    2008 Village Report for Gnadenfeld

    Gnadenfeld, (Russian name Kirovskoye), a small "daughter" colony, was located in the Samara Province, on the weisenseite (meadow side) of the Volga, Quadrant E-5, Map #6 (Stumpp).  It was in the District of Krasny-Kut.

    I am awaiting the 1857 census for Moor, hoping it will list the names of families who moved from Moor to Gnadenfeld in 1855 when Gnadenfeld was organized.

    Due to its small population, I do not receive many inquiries.  This past year I assisted one person researching a Gnadenfeld family, one person researching a Gnadenflur family, and several people seeking information on families from the "mother" colony of Moor, (Russian name Klyuchi).  I am hoping the 1857 census for Moor will bridge the gap between family records of these researchers and the census records going back to the settlement date of Moor.

    I continue to collect surnames from Gnadenfeld and the "mother" colony of Moor, including ship records, Declarations of Intent, naturalization records, census records and obituaries.

    Irma A. Waggoner

    Village Coordinator for Gnadenfeld

     

  • Graf, Samara, Volga

 

  • Grimm, Saratov, Volga

 

  • Güldendorf, Grossliebental, Odessa, Kherson
    2008 Village Report for Güldendorf

    The village of Güldendorf was established in 1829 near the Russian city of Odessa in the Odessa district by families from three villages that had experienced serious water shortages.

    I've had several inquiries this year for families from this village.

    Curt Renz
    Güldendorf Village Coordinator

 

 

  • Hoffnungstal, Akkerman, Bessarabia
    2008 Village Report for Hoffnungstal, Bessarabia

    The village of Hoffnungstal was established in 1842 in Bessarabia by a number of families who had been expelled from the private estate of Karlstal near the Russian city of Odessa.   Within about 5 years additional families from various villages in the Odessa district also moved to Hoffnungstal.

    I've had several inquiries this year for families from this village.

    Curt Renz
    Hoffnungstal, Bessarabia Village Coordinator

     

  • Holstein, Saratov, Volga
    2008 Village Report for Holstein

    Most Holstein correspondence in 2008 was from previous contacts requesting copies of the 1834, 1850 and 1858 Holstein census.  Copies of the original census will soon be placed in the Holstein village file at AHSGR.  One contact attended the 2008 convention which rekindled her interest in her
    family history.

    Church records (1800-1849) for Holstein are now being translated and computerized.  I hope to have them ready for distribution by the summer of 2009.  Information will be posted on the Holstein website when they are available.

    Edith Bottsford

    Holstein Village Coordinator

     

  • Huck, Saratov, Volga
    Huck 2008 Village Report

    One of the pleasures of being a village coordinator is helping researchers "find one another" when they have a common interest in one or more surnames from the village.  This year was no exception and I know that I helped several people learn of a new (even if distant) familial contact.

    The major news this year for the village was the arrival and completion of the translation for the 1834 and 1857 village census records.  After waiting for three years for them to be received, Brent Mai did the translation.   Those records are now available from AHSGR and I plan to enter the data into the Huck database.

    I was fortunate this year to receive and be able to share information and pictures with other Huck researchers about several cemeteries in Entre Rios, Argentina.  The pictures were of grave markers with Huck surnames.  The gentleman who I corresponded with is a member of an organization 'Germans
    from Volga Descendants' who is working hard and seriously to discover and preserve the heritage and history of several Huck surnames in that area.

    Another correspondent from Argentina was focused on surnames Schultheis and Mueller.  I and others provided what information we had.

    A student at the University of Missouri Kansas City (UMKC) asked for material to help with his senior research report about the forced famine that affected the Volga and other regions.  I told him about the ‘Letters from Hell’ translations that are available on the Huck Website and offered to send copies of the translation work being done by Hugh Lichtenwald for other Letters from Hell (he didn't request any more).  He also planned to address the terror of Lenin and Stalin during the periods before the revolution 1921-24, 1932-1933 as well as the forced removal from the villages during WWII with the use of the NKVD and other secret security organizations.  This seemed like a large topic but I offered to help to the extent I could by sending references and material I had available.  He said he would send me a copy of the finished report but unfortunately it hasn't yet arrived.

    Dennis Zitterkopf

    Huck Village Coordinator

     

  • Husaren, Saratov, Volga
    2008 Husaren Report

    Alexander Rollhauser has received four inquires regarding the Rolheiser family and one regarding the Kisser family.  So far he was able to provide information for two of the families.  He has three more inquires about Rolheiser but he is not sure where they lived.
     
    Alexander has made Inquires about Rolheiser and Schoenfeld families at the Archives in both Engel and Saratov and he has numerous records from them.  They include births, deaths and marriages from 1814 to 1917.
     
    We now have the new census information for 1834 and 1857 from Brent Mai.
     
    I purchased from Igor Pleve, census information for Schiefelbein, Dukart, Dietz and Kamlowski.
     
    I have had five requests from the same people with whom I have been working for several years.
     
    In another note, I had Waldamer Kiesner, from Germany, working at my store for two months.  What a great experience this was.  My great-great-grandmother was a Kisner, so this was cool.  Waldamer’s grandfather was born in Pfeifer, Russia where my family was from.
     
    Sheri Rose

    Northeastern Kansas Chapter AHSGR President
    Pfeifer Researcher
    Husaren  Coordinator

     

  • Hussenbach, Linevo Ozero, Saratov, Volga

 

  • Johannestal, Berezan, Odessa, Kherson
    2008 Village Coordinator¹s Report

    Village of Johannestal, Beresan, Odessa
     
    I continue to maintain the Johannestal website and have been getting a query or two per month, mostly because of the website.  I have a rather large database of Johanestal descendants that was developed by a colleague of mine and that has been most useful in answering family history questions.
     
    I remain active in the BDO (Beresan District Odessa) RIG for the GRHS and hope to begin more translation of archive material soon.

    Ray Heinle

    Village Coordinator for Johannestal

     

  • Josefstal / Schwabe Khutor, Saratov, Volga
    2008 Village Coordinator Report for Josefstal

    There is not much new to report.  My cousin and I have been working on a history of Josefstal.  We are hopeful it will be published in 2009.  The original edition will be in German.

    While I get many hits on the Josefstal web site, it does not translate into actual contacts.  That is slow, with most folks who have ties to Josefstal now living in Germany.

    The extensive Soviet-era documents I obtained from the archive include some that have a little genealogical value.  The bulk of the documents, however, give a tiring explanation on how potatoes are to be harvested.

    One fascinating document gives the actual order for the Catholic Church in Josefstal to be torn down, the wood recycled and used to build a club house in the neighboring village of Oberdorf.

    Ted Gerk
    Village Coordinator for Josefstal

 

  • Jost, Samara, Volga
    2008 Annual Village Report for Jost
     
    The good news for Jost this year is the acquisition of Jost Census Records for 1815/1834 and 1850/1857, as well as Stier birth records 1795-1820 and 1834-1864.  I am just beginning the process of adding all this new information to the database to see where the branches lead, which often take me to other Kanton Kukkus villages.
     
    With the aid of my newly added Jost mailing list, RUS-SAMARA-JOST, and the Jost website, have received a lot of inquiries this year, including several new contacts, newly-found relatives (which is always a treat), and continuing contact with others.  All have contributed valuable information for the village database adding flesh to bland statistics.  Many have sent photos, which have been added to the website.  Together, weʼve been able to make some exciting discoveries.  I continue to hear from Jost descendants in Germany and continue to be amazed by the number of Volga connections these repatriated German citizens maintain in both Germany and Russia.

     Unfortunately, only one Jost descendant attended the AHSGR/GRHS joint convention in Casper, Wyoming.  But, having the opportunity to become better acquainted with other Kanton Kukkus coordinators made it more than worthwhile.  I look forward to the 2009 AHSGR Convention in Medicine Hat, Alberta.

     Beth Mueller-Rohn Davenport
    Jost (Popovkina) Village Coordinator

     

  • Kamenka, Saratov, Volga
    2008 Village Report for Kamenka

    Kamenka is a Volga colony situated 73 miles from Saratov near the Ilawla River.  There are over 300 populated places with the name Kamenka in Russia.

    According to the ANNOTATED INVENTORY OF CASES OF THE SARATOV KONTORA OF FOREIGN SETTLERS, Volume 2, which is in process for publication by AHSGR, the first Kamenka parochial church built is noted in an entry made 13 October 1797.  The second church was built of wood in 1832 and burned down in 1890.   What remains of St. Mary's Catholic Church today in Kamenka was built in 1907.

    The church still standing is in very poor condition.  The steeple was struck by lightning in recent years and burned.  The roof has fallen in.  Our artist friend, Mike Boss, has painted some beautiful pictures of the Kamenka windmills, frescos of the interior of the St. Mary's Church, a village view showing the church nestled in the center of the village and a train chugging by the Kamenka village.

    Kamenka church records begin in 1797 and continue to 1867.  Early St. Mary's Church records also contain the baptism, marriage and death records for Pfeifer [Gniluschka], Husaren [Yelschanka], and Hildman [Panovka].  These records should be available from the Saratov archives.

    Many inquiries continue to come from Argentina.  I have found where my Great-grandfather Jacob Wiesner's sister lived in Colony Hinoyo, one of the first colonies settled by the Volga Germans in Argentina.   Katarina [Catalina] married Leonardo Schwindt before they left Kamenka.  In the 1850
    Kamenka census I found that my Great-grandfather had two additional sisters, Agnes and Susanna.  I believe that Agnes also went to Argentina but I do not know who she married.

    Following the Patriotic War of 1812 many of the soldiers from Napoleon's Army remained in the Volga area.  Only one of these lived in Kamenka, Tomas Schmucker.  He appears in the 1834 Kamenka census.

    Rosemary Larson
    Village Coordinator for Kamenka

     

  • Kassel, Glückstal, Odessa, Kherson

 

  • Kautz, Saratov, Volga
    2008 Kautz Report

    This year has been a good year for research.

    I processed 34 Kautz-related obituaries from the Volga-German Listserv and from friends and family.  I was in contact with 53 Kautz-descended families since the last report was filed.  Included was new information, dissemination of my information, current and past obituaries, Pleve charts sent, customized charts and reports sent, CD's sent.  There were thirteen requests for information which turned out to be unrelated to Kautz.  I forwarded four non-Kautz requests to other village coordinators.

    A lot of time was spent revising a large report for the Kautz CD which now includes all the names in the Kautz database, currently numbering 23,724 individuals.  For each person the report includes name, sex, birthdate (birthyear if living), birthplace, father, mother, marriage date, spouse, deathdate and death place.

    A "Unsere Leute von Kautz" CD was distributed to 43 individuals during the year.  It reflects the ten paper volumes which my aunt Elaine Frank Davison produced during her lifetime.  It also contains Volume 9 which I developed.  Included in Volume 9 are photos of present-day ruins of Kautz and all Kautz surname charts from Dr. Pleve.  The CD has been made available free of charge to those with a proven lineage to those who lived in Kautz and most likely were related to the first Kautz settlers.

    The highlight of my year was to be able to attend a Frank family reunion in Laurel, Montana in August, 2008, in honor of Jake Frank.  It was known as the "Frank Roundup".  He passed away November 9, 2008 at the age of 93 and left a legacy of hard work, determination, leadership, and friendship…a good role model for many Americans.  There were many from near and far who were able to attend.  I met many people in person with whom I had been corresponding for months.  Present was Linda Kathrine Yost Berg.  She and I compared notes on Jake's family and we were able to help each other bring Jake's family information up to date.  She distributed the final results to those who attended.  As it turns out, my grandfather, Johann Conrad Frank, used to travel via train to Laurel/Billings from Walla Walla to visit Jake and his family.  Jacob spoke fondly of those visits.

    My friend and collaborator from Yakima, Barbara Balzer Drake (1943-2008), was an AHSGR fixture and loyal member for many years.  Her positive attitude and zest for life was reflected every time we met.  I will miss her.

    I am researching microfilm for two Kautz village surnames and will notify those interested of my findings.

    Again this year, I am the AHSGR reports editor for Village Coordinator reports.  I want to commend the Village Coordinators who have taken the time to explain the progress of their work on their villages.  I am proud to be associated with them.

    Michael Frank
    Village Coordinator for Kautz

     

  • Kind
    2008 Village Report for Kind

    After I joined AHSGR this fall, I realized what a distressingly small amount of information was available for my father’s ancestral village of Kind. So I set out to do something about that.

    Information on passenger arrivals is readily available on the Internet for free or at Ancestry.com, so an Excel file of arrivals from Kind (Baskakovka in Russian) was assembled. Even though I attended a Lutheran church in Port Huron, Michigan with many members who came directly from Kind in 1912 or 1913, it was a surprise to discover that most immigrants first went to nearby McGregor, Michigan to harvest sugar beets, then came to the “Big City” of Port Huron.

    A trip to the Family History Center in Salt Lake City led to location of a census for 1857 for Kind and many of the surrounding villages and towns. The census for Kind will be translated from Russian soon and a copy placed in the AHSGR library. There were also censuses for 1834 and 1850 for villages in that area. The Family History Center also has microfilm reels of military recruits, which I didn’t have a chance to look at in depth.

    The 1857 census filled in a 75-year gap in my genealogy from the 1798 census which covers all of the Volga-Germans to the birth of my great-grandfather in 1873.

     A trip to Port Huron is under consideration, since it was a port of entry by ship and for those who came first to the Maritime Provinces of Canada and continued their journey by rail to Michigan. The local library and county clerk also have some great information for those who want to learn more about their ancestors from Kind. A more broadly based project to track Volga-Germans in southeastern Michigan is also being mulled – compared to other areas of the U.S. where GRs settled, the story of Michigan’s GRs has scarcely been told.

    Bill Pickelhaupt

    Kind Village Coordinator

     
  • Klosterdorf, Swedish Colonies, Nikolaev and Kherson
    2008 Old Swedish Villages Report

    Villages of Alt-Schwedendorf, Mühlhausendorf, Schlangendorf, and Klosterdorf.

     I received inquiries on family names of Buch, Meier, Rexin, Oppenlaender, Hein, Specht within the villages and with the help of fellow researchers of these villages have helped them to further their research.

    I have also received inquiries from a university student in Ukraine who is interested in researching the history of these villages since it is still an unresearched topic to this day.  The University of Alberta has also recently embraced this area's unique history which can be found in English on www.svenskbyborna.com under Canadian.   Jörgen Hedman has written the story from a Swedish viewpoint but the German experience is still the same.

    These villages represent a unique diaspora that are a crossover of cultures and, as a result, have been, by the large part, rejected, by the Swedes and Germans alike because they do not fit into either ethnic group.

    I had an inquiry about a mailing list for a newsletter but since these colonies have not had a coordinator for so long, and the villages are so small, and the Germans have not been resident in the villages for so many years, there are very few inquiries.

    I was mistaken about attending the German Lutheran Church in Mühlhausendorf in 2007, it was actually in Schlangendorf.  There is only one German family that lives in the village today.  They were banned from returning to this area when the German army rescued them in 1944/1945 and took them to camps in Poland.  It is very possible that the church will close in the coming years.

    I have written a book about the immigration of the villagers from the Swedish villages to North America between 1889 and 1931.  It traces their genealogy and pioneer history and can be ordered at www.swedesincanada.net.

    My great-uncle's memoirs about his life in the village from 1900-1929 is now complete and will be posted on the Svenskbyborna-Canadian website in January 2009.

    I continue to dedicate time to SOAR as my time permits.

    Respectfully submitted,
    Karen Wright

    Village Coordiator for Alt-Schwedendorf, Mühlhausendorf, Schlangendorf and Klosterdorf

     

  • Köhler, Saratov, Volga\

 

  • Kolb, Saratov, Volga
    2008 Village Report for Kolb

    This past year has brought more inquiries than in previous years.  I have been able to help most of the researchers.

    The most exciting thing that has happened recently is receiving records from Russia.  In these records I have found many missing links in my family lines.  I have been looking for 30 years for this information.

    Records received are:
         KOLB marriages        1-Jan 1845 to 30 Dec 1907
         KOLB deaths              31 Dec 1887 to 26 Dec 1887
         KOLB births                1873-1918

    Health problems have prevented me from attending conventions for several years.

    In the future I would like to have a website for Kolb.   Don't know quite how to go about this at present.

    Thelma Koch Sprenger
    KOLB Village Coordinator

     

  • Konstantinovka, Samara, Volga

 

  • Kraft, Saratov, Volga

 

  • Krasnojar
    2008 Village Report for Krasnojar

    In the last year I have received no queries about this village.  I have been collecting obituaries and information from Newspaper Archives, Ancestry and the Ger-Rus list and that has helped me to add more detailed information to those in my database.  I did not have the luxury to attend the convention.  I work 35 hours a week and live in Wisconsin.  Paid vacation time from work is used to visit my grandchildren who live in Florida.  I only get to see them twice a year.  Genealogy is my passion and hobby.  I will continue to update my files and am willing to work with anyone who contacts me.

    Susie Weber Hess

    Village Coordinator for Krasnojar

     
  • Kratzke, Saratov, Volga
    2008 Village Report for Kratzke & Ährenfeld

    2008 has been an active year for those researching families from the Volga German colonies of Kratzke and Ährenfeld.  I don't track exact statistics of inquiries, but there have been on average two or three each week.  The website of these colonies, http://www.berschauer.com/Genealogy/index2.html, continues to receive 50-75 hits per week.

    Surnames from Kratzke include: Bender, Berschauer, Blehm, Boxberger, Deines, Dietz, Fabrizius, Gideon, Grohs, Jäger, Knaus, Koleber, Krug, Mai, Maier/Meier, Michaelis, Müller, Schäfer, Schneider, Schröder, Schwien, & Templing.

    There have been no new "German origins" found this year for Kratzke families.

    The largest number of new contacts with researchers is coming from Germany and Russia.  Thanks to the efforts of Hugh Lichtenwald (on the farm in South Carolina), there have been several "famine letters" translated that are either from or mention families in Kratzke.

    Passenger ship lists have been located for several immigrant families.

    There has been a lot of work connecting extended families from other colonies:  Deines from Dönhof, Rosenheim, Franzosen, and Norka; Blehm from Shcherbakovka and Dobrinka.  The newly available censuses for Dobrinka (1834, 1850, and 1857) have been very helpful in this regard.

    I enjoyed seeing wonderful family and friends at the AHSGR/GRHS Conference in Casper!

    That's it for 2008.

    Brent Mai

    Village Coordinator for Kratzke and Ährenfeld


     

  • Kronental, North Caucasus

 

  • Kukkus, Samara, Volga
    2008 Village Report for Kukkus

    The Kukkus database now contains about 10,400 names.  The requests for 2008 have been for the names of Isheim, Reifschneider, Hergenrader, and Krum.  The correspondents have given me information to put into the file.  Most of this information I already had, but it helped me link some families that were not previously linked.  I put in some information sent by a new member whose
    family name is Wiederkehr, the Kukkus name Ebel being already in the database.

    I will be the new Kukkus village coordinator as Betty Muradian has resigned this position. I will probably be working with Rick Herzog's Kukkus Families website.  I still need to get some particulars on the site and what can and cannot be posted there.

    I have researched some names on rootsweb and ancestry for census and family connections.  Also, I have researched some Social Security Death Index records. Several years ago, I took pictures of the cemeteries of Wyuka in Lincoln, Nebraska, Au Gres, Michigan and Fresno, California of known Kukkus
    names.  I have Descendancy charts for Krumm, Lehman, Heinrich and part of a Weigandt chart.

    I have some pictures of Wenings, Germany and Lengfeld, Germany.  Betty sent me a few pictures of Kukkus.  I will be acquiring her Kukkus files in February.

    Eleanor Sissell

    Village Coordinator for Kukkus

     

  • Kulm, Bessarabia

 

  • Lauwe, Saratov, Volga
    2008 Village Coordinator¹s Report

    Village of Lauwe, Saratov, Volga
     
    In early 2008 I took over as the village coordinator for the village of Lauwe, my predecessor, friend, and cousin, Bernice Geringer Madden having passed away somewhat earlier.  After several failed attempts at getting Bernice’s Lauwe papers I managed to sort out a complete set of Bernice¹s newsletters, the “Lauwe Lampe”.    I also retrieved some of the village records from AHSGR headquarters.
     
    In February I put up a Lauwe web page and scanned in all of the old Lampe articles and placed them there.  I contacted Brent Mai and with a little seed money and publicity from me, Brent has secured, translated, and published an English version of the 1834 Census of Lauwe. 

    Ray Heinle

    Village Coordinator for Lauwe

     
  • Leichtling, Saratov, Volga


 

  • Leipzig, Bessarabia

 

  • Lillienfeld, North Caucasus

.

  • Louis, Samara, Volga
    2008 Village Report for Louis

    I have only had about five or six inquiries concerning Louis, Russia.  I always try to answer these as soon as possible, which is sometimes not until I get back to Arizona in order to check through my reference material.

    I did receive some great pictures of Louis from Viktor Pink from Germany.  I published these in one of my newsletters.  I love getting these pictures of the villages.  My newsletter is one of my favorite tasks as a Village Coordinator.  I look forward to publishing it four times a year, and I do always forward a copy to AHSGR for my folder.  This year (and part of last year) I have begun a feature about "So We Will Know Them" with a photo and a biography, plus any article they have gathered together for publication
    concerning their ancestors.  These are really great to read and to see what they look like so as to become familiar with our members and searchers.

    Thelma Mills
    Village Coordinator for Louis, Russia

     

  • Luzern,  Samara, Volga
    2008 Village Report for Luzern

    Luzern is one of the Northern Volga Catholic Colonies.  I have not received any e-mails concerning this colony, but I was able to obtain church records.  These included baptism records from 1892-1900 and 1912-1916.  This is not complete by any means.

    Kevin Rupp

    Luzern Village Coordinator

 

 

  • Mariental, Samara, Volga
    2008 Village Report for Mariental

    Most of the inquiries received are for the Village of Mariental.  There are always many for this village, so I travel with my reference material for Mariental.  I'd like to bring my material for all three of my villages, but it's like the German saying "You can't have everything, where is the room for it!"

    I am still very busy, working almost full time on my book on my parents and their Mariental and Herzog ancestors.  I am hoping to get it completed this year, but time is again getting away from me.

    I have become acquainted with another Kinderknecht (whose ancestors were from Mariental) and actually had a visit from him and his wife.  What a nice visit we had.  It was great to fill in that family in my Family Tree Maker.  I also heard from Adolf Exner (a Weigel relative) living in Bavaria concerning the Weigel lineage I have on my web page.  My poor web page is like an orphan anymore.  My granddaughter cannot update it anymore, as she has two full time jobs, and I am unable to update it myself.  So it will stay the same until I get my book finished, then I will take a class again and re-learn how to add all of the items that I have in my file, waiting to be inserted.  I then will also have all of my Newsletters on the web page.

    My assistant, my daughter, Theresa, is working for the State of Kansas this year, so we both have our hands full, but are trying to always follow through with any inquiries.  She was taking a class on web pages until she was called to her position with the State.  So it goes!

    I wish to thank Denise and Michael Grau for the wonderful and numerous pictures of Mariental.  I will feature them in a future newsletter.  Their trip to the Village of Mariental must have been a tremendous experience.

    I like the new plan of receiving a family tree chart from a new member who has joined our Association.  I think I only have received three this past year but they are most welcome.  That is one of the plus's we Village Coordinators have.  I know that everyone is supposed to submit a family tree when they join, so I would like to be able to receive one for my Village Book.  That's almost asking too much for all of the Mariental, Louis, and Chasselois members already in the system, but I will work on it.

    Thelma Mills
    Village Coordinator for Mariental

 

  • Markosowka, North Caucasus

 

  • Messer, Saratov, Volga

 

  • Molochna Colony Mennonite Villages

 

  • Moor, Saratov, Volga
    MOOR COLONY ANNUAL REPORT 2008

    This has been a productive year for the Moor group.  

    I attended the Casper Convention where many of us met for the first time and I also met new researchers.

    Discovered at the Family History Center in Salt Lake City was a 1:100,000 scale map of the Volga district printed in 1935.  This depicts all of the Volga German settlements then still in existence.  Although the script is in Cyrillic, the village names are the German names.

    The Isenburg church record book sold very well, considering it has a limited realm of interest.  Research into German origins expanded into the Kurpfalz area for the first time.  Initial finds were encouraging. Thanks to Dick Kraus an expanded talk on researching in Germany will be presented at the 2009
    convention.

    Two issues of the Balzer/Moor newsletter have been sent out this year to about 60 researchers.   We expect to send out one more issue before the end of the year.

    Please see Irma Waggoner's report on Gnadenfeld, which also deals with the Moor Colony.

    Wayne Bonner

     

  • Mühlhausendorf, Swedish Colonies, Nikolaev and Kherson
    2008 Old Swedish Villages Report

    Villages of Alt-Schwedendorf, Mühlhausendorf, Schlangendorf, and Klosterdorf.

     I received inquiries on family names of Buch, Meier, Rexin, Oppenlaender, Hein, Specht within the villages and with the help of fellow researchers of these villages have helped them to further their research.

    I have also received inquiries from a university student in Ukraine who is interested in researching the history of these villages since it is still an unresearched topic to this day.  The University of Alberta has also recently embraced this area's unique history which can be found in English on www.svenskbyborna.com under Canadian.   Jörgen Hedman has written the story from a Swedish viewpoint but the German experience is still the same.

    These villages represent a unique diaspora that are a crossover of cultures and, as a result, have been, by the large part, rejected, by the Swedes and Germans alike because they do not fit into either ethnic group.

    I had an inquiry about a mailing list for a newsletter but since these colonies have not had a coordinator for so long, and the villages are so small, and the Germans have not been resident in the villages for so many years, there are very few inquiries.

    I was mistaken about attending the German Lutheran Church in Mühlhausendorf in 2007, it was actually in Schlangendorf.  There is only one German family that lives in the village today.  They were banned from returning to this area when the German army rescued them in 1944/1945 and took them to camps in Poland.  It is very possible that the church will close in the coming years.

    I have written a book about the immigration of the villagers from the Swedish villages to North America between 1889 and 1931.  It traces their genealogy and pioneer history and can be ordered at www.swedesincanada.net.

    My great-uncle's memoirs about his life in the village from 1900-1929 is now complete and will be posted on the Svenskbyborna-Canadian website in January 2009.

    I continue to dedicate time to SOAR as my time permits.

    Respectfully submitted,
    Karen Wright

    Village Coordiator for Alt-Schwedendorf, Mühlhausendorf, Schlangendorf and Klosterdorf

     

  • Neu-Danzig, Nikolaev, Kherson
    2008 Village Report for Neu Danzig

    The village of Neu Danzig was established in 1842 near the Russian city of Nikolajew in the Nikolajew district by a number of individuals from the village of Alt Danzig.   In addition, a number of families joined the village from Worms, Rohrbach, and München in the next few years.

    I've had several inquiries this year for families from this village.

    Curt Renz
    Neu Danzig Village Coordinator

     

  • Neudorf, Glückstal, Odessa, South Russia

 

  • Neu Moor, Saratov, Volga
    2008 Village Coordinator Report for Neu-Moor

    Neu-Moor (Russian name Pogranichnyy), was a "grand-daughter" colony, formed in the 1920's by people living in the "mother" colony of Moor.  It was located in the Balzer District on the Bergseite (west or hilly side) of the Volga River, and was approximately 30 - 40 miles from the mother colony of Moor.

    Very little information is available on Neu-Moor.  So far there has been only one person seeking information on this colony.

    Irma A. Waggoner

    Village Coordinator for Neu-Moor

     

  • Neu-OberMonjou, Samara, Volga, Russia

 

  • Neu-Schilling I and II, Samara, Volga

 

 

  • Neu-Straub, Saratov, Volga

 

  • Neu-Yagodnaya, Samara, Volga
    2008 Village Report for New Yagodnaya

    New Yagodnaya (Neu Jagodnaya) was located 65 miles ESE of Saratov or 100 miles ESE of its mother colony Yagodnaya Polyana.  It was founded in 1855.
     
    I received no inquiries this year regarding this village.
     
    Laurin Wilhelm
    V.C. for Pobochnoye, Schoendorf, Schoenfeld, Schoental, New Yagodnaya and Strassendorf.

     

  • Nieder-Monjou, Samara, Volga
    2008 Report for Nieder-Monjou

    During the past year we received seven queries concerning the following Nieder-Monjou surnames: Anschutz, Herber, Hilgenberg, Bisterfeldt/Biesterfeld, Schneider, Steinpreis/Steinepreis and Stoppel.


    We were pleased to be able to reunite a family from Russia, now living in Germany, with relatives in the United States.


    We have also added an example of the Nieder-Monjou German dialect to the Nieder-Monjou web site.

    Michael Grau and Steven Grau

    Village Coordinators for Nieder-Monjou

 

  • North Caucasus
    2008 Village Report for North Caucasus

    As VC for the North Caucasus, not to be confused with the Trans or South Caucasus communities, we are dealing with a region of at least 120 individual villages of varying sizes which are reflections of all the original German settlements throughout Russia.  This is an area of a unique history that remains
    obscure because thus far we have been unable to acquire church or civil records which would help identify and connect the population with that of their Volga, Black Sea, Volhynian, Bessarabian, Chernigov or other origins.

    Worthy of great admiration are the excellently organized VC programs of the Volga Colonies and the GCRA, which have been accomplished through much hard work and in the case of the Volga, the advent of Igor and Ludmila Pleve whose now famous charts have produced such a core of meaningful information.

    Unfortunately, our North Caucasus Research Association--a title adopted for the recent Casper Convention--lacks the manpower to accumulate all the information that does exist somewhere in one form or another.  As a 91 year old, it is questionable how much longer our Lord will provide me with the energy required to maintain the research levels established thus far, making younger blood
    most welcome.

    It is obvious that a great interest in the genealogy as well as history of the villages does exist for I continually receive requests for information for which unfortunately critical facts are often lacking, but I gladly share whatever data may identify with the query.  A couple of months ago, two women,
    sisters, one from Phoenix and the other San Diego spent two days exploring my records. They are now AHSGR members greatly satisfied at what they were able to learn about their grandfather and great grandfather of Kronental (Nemetzki Chaginskoe) in the North Caucasus.   Another lady with her son and aunt has arranged to come from McPherson, Kansas, for a similar research experience in early
    December of this year.

    My plea is for help in locating the archives that contain these invaluable church and possibly civil records as well as people with a willingness to become physically involved with a project that will require concerted effort but offers great satisfaction as a reward.

    Respectully sbmitted,
    Arthur E. Flegel

     
  • Oberdorf, Saratov, Volga
    2008 Village Report for Oberdorf, Saratov, Volga

    Oberdorf research has been slow this year.  The researchers that have been able to connect their families in the past to the Oberdorf 1858 Census have moved on to the mother colonies and the associated census records prior to 1858 in the mother colonies.  There have been a few new researchers in 2008, but unless they were able to connect to the 1858 census, they are unable to make connections because of the missing church records. There are hopes that the missing church records may be in the Saratov archives.

    Teri Helzer

    Village Coordinator for Oberdorf

     

  • Ober-Monjou, Samara, Volga
    2008 Village Report for Obermunjou

    This has been a good year for the colony of Obermunjou.  I have not had many e-mails from people wanting information, but the ones I did receive were very productive and willing to share information.

    I received photos from the Schneider and Exner families that lived in Obermunjou.

    This has been a good year for obtaining records, these include:

    Marriages:  1839, 1840, 1858
                         1874-1911 (Complete)

    Baptisms:     1821-1826, 1827-1835, 1849-1918
                           (Not complete records, only certain families)
    Deaths:        (not complete)
                         1850-1876
                         1890 - 1906
                         1907-1918

    For a number of years the Obermunjou and Katharinenstadt parishes were together and shared Church books so there is a crossover of many of these families.

    Kevin Rupp

    Obermunjou Village Coordinator
    www.volgagerman.net

     

 

  • Odessa
    2008 Report for Odessa

    Shortly before volunteering to be coordinator for the city of Odessa, I completed stage one of the St. Paul's Lutheran church, Odessa web pages, which reside on the Germans From Russia Heritage Collection website, under the direction of Michael Miller at North Dakota State University:
    http://library.ndsu.edu/grhc/history_culture/history/stpaul/index.html

    The church was the heart of the German community in Odessa, as the majority of Germans in Odessa were Lutheran.  My goal for the St. Paul web pages is to build as complete a picture of the historical church and its congregation as possible, from its beginnings in 1803 until 1937, when it was forcibly
    closed down by the communist regime, and to leverage the power of the Internet to connect with descendants of the community across the world.

    In the few months since I started as coordinator for the City of Odessa, I have had inquiries from just two people; however, none of the names they were seeking was listed in the Odessa City Names PAF database (as of 30 June 2008).

    As a result, I decided to compile a separate list of names from the following sources:

    Bienemann, Friedrich.  *Geschichte der evangelisch-lutherischen Gemeinde zu Odessa.* Odessa: Schultze, 1890.

    Schnurr, Joseph.  *Die Kirchen und das religiöse Leben der Rußlanddeutschen.
    **Evangelischer Teil. *2nd rev. ed. Stuttgart: AER Verlag, Landsmannschaft der Deutschen aus Russland, 1978.

    W.H. "Odessa und die deutschen Kolonisten." *Heimatbuch der Deutschen aus Russland. *(1956): 21-39.

    The names on this new list consist mostly of people associated with St. Paul's Lutheran church, Odessa, including (but not limited to) clergy, music directors, school teachers and administrators, pupils, and business people.

    As opportunity allows, I will continue to add names to the list from other sources, and check them in the PAF database.

    Ella M. Melik
    Village Coordinator for Odessa

     
  • Old Swedish Villages
    2008 Old Swedish Villages Report

    Villages of Alt-Schwedendorf, Mühlhausendorf, Schlangendorf, and Klosterdorf.

     I received inquiries on family names of Buch, Meier, Rexin, Oppenlaender, Hein, Specht within the villages and with the help of fellow researchers of these villages have helped them to further their research.

    I have also received inquiries from a university student in Ukraine who is interested in researching the history of these villages since it is still an unresearched topic to this day.  The University of Alberta has also recently embraced this area's unique history which can be found in English on www.svenskbyborna.com under Canadian.   Jörgen Hedman has written the story from a Swedish viewpoint but the German experience is still the same.

    These villages represent a unique diaspora that are a crossover of cultures and, as a result, have been, by the large part, rejected, by the Swedes and Germans alike because they do not fit into either ethnic group.

    I had an inquiry about a mailing list for a newsletter but since these colonies have not had a coordinator for so long, and the villages are so small, and the Germans have not been resident in the villages for so many years, there are very few inquiries.

    I was mistaken about attending the German Lutheran Church in Mühlhausendorf in 2007, it was actually in Schlangendorf.  There is only one German family that lives in the village today.  They were banned from returning to this area when the German army rescued them in 1944/1945 and took them to camps in Poland.  It is very possible that the church will close in the coming years.

    I have written a book about the immigration of the villagers from the Swedish villages to North America between 1889 and 1931.  It traces their genealogy and pioneer history and can be ordered at www.swedesincanada.net.

    My great-uncle's memoirs about his life in the village from 1900-1929 is now complete and will be posted on the Svenskbyborna-Canadian website in January 2009.

    I continue to dedicate time to SOAR as my time permits.

    Respectfully submitted,
    Karen Wright

    Village Coordiator for Alt-Schwedendorf, Mühlhausendorf, Schlangendorf and Klosterdorf

     

  • Orlovskoye, Samara, Volga

 

  • Paulskoye, Samara, Volga
    2008 Village Coordinator Report for Paulskoye
     
    I am pleased to report that this has been a good year! The most exciting discovery is that both the 1850 and the 1857 census revisions for Paulskaya have been microfilmed and are available for rental from the LDS Church. We have Willima Pickelhaupt to thank for this discovery.  He and I had previously  corresponded about colonist connections between  Paulskoye and his ancestral village of Kind, the DORTMAN surname and  anything he could learn about his PICKELHAUPT family.  Roll  #2362213 contains the 1850 Paulskaya census. The 1857 census can be found on rolls #2373694, #2373695, and #2373696 ---it is unknown at this  time which specific roll has Paulskaya village on it. The documents are,
    of course, in old Russian.
     
    I was contacted by a Daniel Kazimirow of Buenos Aires, Argentina.  His grandfather Johannes MERKEL (b. 1886) first settled in Punta Alta, Buenos Aires in 1913, and then removed to Villa Alba, La Pampa, and later  Urdinarrain, Entre Rios.  This is my first case of a Paulskoyer settling in Argentina!  Other family names include ALBACH, RIFLING, and FRIEBUS.  Family data and photos were obtained.
     
    I continued to correspond with family researchers from previous years.  First, I further assisted a Canadian researcher regarding surname BOXHORN.  Second, anniversary and gravestones) concerning a BACHMAN family in Michigan.
     
    A couple of researchers contacted me in search of their villages of origin because their surnames of interest were the same as those found in Paulskoye.  Although it turned out their ancestors were not from Paulskoye, I worked with them to pinpoint likely villages of origin and refer them to other village 
    coordinators.
     
    Finally, although I did not attend this year's joint AHSGR/GRHS Conference I did compile a village handout for those who attended and had an  interest in Paulskoye.
     
    Respectfully submitted,
     
    Tim Weeder
    AHSGR VC, Paulskoye

 

  • Pfeifer, Saratov, Volga
    2008 Village Report for Pfeifer

    PFEIFER [Gnilushka] Village is located near Kamenka.

    According to the Annotated Inventory of Cases of the Saratov Kontora of Foreign Settlers, Volume 2, covering the time period 1723 to 1868, there is an interesting entry about my ancestor, Johannes Wiesner.  The entry, dated 6 April 1799, states that the "economics of colonist Boehm of Pfeifer" were transferred to Johannes Wiesner of Kamenka.

    An entry about the orphans of Adam Kisner and his son Johann Adam is dated 16 October 1831.

    This Inventory is in process for publication by AHSGR.  The Russian copy of this book consists of 480 pages.  Translation is being done now.  Funds are needed to complete the publication of this interesting book.  There are over 100 entries for the village of Pfeifer alone.

    Another entry with the date of 16 July 1835 states that my ancestor, Johann Adam Kisner, moved from Pfeifer to Kamenka.

    A few years ago there was a request by a Matt Bigelow on the Volga Listserve.  He was asking if anyone could direct him to someone in Argentina because he was interested in doing research on the Volga German communities.  I contacted Gerardo Waimann with whom I had e-mail exchanges for several years, and sent him a copy of the request.  Gerardo wrote to Matt and arrangements were made for the visit.  This year of 2008 Matt Bigelow wrote about his trip to Argentina and it may be read at this website:  http://www.brueggemancenter.org/brueggeman-fellows/fall-2005/matt-bigelow.  Then click on "Read Matt's Essay".

    Rosemary Larson

    Pfeifer Village Coordinator

 

  • Pobochnoye, Saratov, Volga
    2008 Village Report for Pobochnoye

    Pobochnoye (Nebendorf) was founded in the spring of 1773, 40 miles NW of Saratov by a group of 29 families, mostly Reformed, from Darmstadt, Germany.  In the fall of 1772 they were led by a Pastor Johann Heinrich Fuchs.  As the years passed by, the villagers gradually became Lutheran.
     
    An account of the settling of the village was printed in 2006 in the Omsk, Siberia newspaper.  It was apparently written by Dr. Pleve and others.  It is a six-page typed account of the hardships en route from Darmstadt to St. Petersburg to Saratov.   My cousin Alelxander Wilhelm of Speyer, Germany
    translated it from Russian to German.  I translated it from German into English.
     
    Several efforts have been made this year to locate descendents of Pobochnoye folks now living in Germany.  Cousin Alexander Wilhelm located an Olga (Wilhelm) Hammer.  Using the 1857 Pobochnoye census we found that her great-grandfather Friedrich Wilhelm born 1852 and my great-grandfather Friedrich Wilhelm born 1853 were both born in Pobochnoye and were first or second cousins.   They were small boys when their families made the 100 mile trek to the southeast to help found a daughter
    colony Schoenfeld.  More census research is needed.
     
    Another "Wilhelm" cousin, Kenny Stugart, visited the Saratov Archive in June and obtained genealogical information on our villagers.  Cousin Alex Wilhelm was able to learn from the Saratov Archive that his grandfather Peter Wilhelm was born in Pobochnoye in 1889. 
     
    The highlight of the year in the Pobochnoye arena was the fact that Cousin Alex Wilhelm and his wife Valentina were able to attend the Casper Convention.  They enjoyed visiting the displays, attending the lectures and most of all, meeting other German-Russian people.  After returning to Speyer, Germany they received many calls and visitors about their trip to America.
     
    I received some 50 inquiries about people and historical information from folks in Argentina, Brazil and Germany, as well as the USA.  Having the various censuses was very helpful for answering the inquiries. 
     
    Laurin P. Wilhelm
    V.C. for Pobochnoye, Schoendorf, Schoenfeld, Schoental, New  Yagodnaya and Strassendorf

     

  • Polish Volhynia
    Polish Volhynia 2008 Report

    As of October 2008, I have been Village Coordinator for Polish Volhynia for one year and it has been a learning experience for me.  Leona Janke has been very helpful in getting me started and nurturing me along as a Village Coordinator.  Although there was no Heritage Hall display for Volhynia at the Joint Convention in Casper, a group of six met together informally on Village night.  Two were experienced and shared information about their families.  One of the participants needed help finding the village of her ancestors, and two others had hit a brick wall in their genealogy.  I brought resource books and maps for Polish Volhynia but found that resources from other parts of Volhynia were also needed.  I have begun to put together a list of library resources found in Lincoln, Nebraska.  Recent sad news is
    that Ewald Wuschke, a long time Volhynian genealogist has passed away.  He was publisher of the "Wandering Volhynians" Magazine.  Our thoughts and prayers go out to his son.

    Mabel Kiessling
    Polish Volhynia Village Coordinator

     

  • Reinhard(t), Samara, Volga

 

  • Reinwald
    2008 Village Report for Reinwald

    During the last year I have received no queries about this village.  I have been collecting obituaries and information from Newspaper Archives, Ancestry and the Ger-Rus list and that has helped me to add more detailed information to those in my database.  I did not have the luxury to attend the convention.  I work 35 hours a week and live in Wisconsin.  Paid vacation time from work is used to visit my grandchildren who live in Florida.  I only get to see them twice a year.  Genealogy is my passion and hobby.  I will continue to update my files and am willing to work with anyone who contacts me.

    Susie Weber Hess

    Reinwald Village Coordinator

     

 

  • Rohleder, Samara, Volga
    2008 Village Report for Rohleder

    There has not been many e-mails regarding this colony which is located in the northern part of the Volga.

    I ordered a Glassmann chart for a friend from Dr. PLeve many moons ago and we still wait for that chart.

    Church Records that I have obtained this year include:

    Marriages:
         1840 (complete)  includes families from Herzog, Graf
         1882 (not compete)
         1887 (not complete)
         1896 (not complete)
         1897 (not complete)

    Kevin Rupp

    Rohleder Village Coordinator

     

  • Rohrbach
    2008 Village Report for Rohrbach

    Since I am new to the job, the only thing I have been able to complete is to provide AHSGR with detailed descriptions of life in Rohrbach and information on the original settlers and settlement.  They were taken from my recently completed book “The German Russians”.

    Jim Griess

    Village Coordinator for Rohrbach

     

  • Rosenberg / Umet, Saratov, Volga
    VC report for Rosenberg - 2008

    As has become the norm this has been quite a quiet year.  I have dealt with 13 queries concerning families in the village of Rosenberg.  This may partly reflect the fact that as a daughter colony which was only founded in the 1850s, there was much less time for the development of larger family groups than in the mother colonies.  The website for the village continues to be visited on a regular basis, recording 300 page views in the 30 days up to the writing of this report.  The files which attract most attention are Manweiler, Ziegler, Dahlinger, Kuxhaus(en), Seifert, the history page and Rosenberg immigrants through Ellis Island, the surnames list and the Rosenberg map.   Almost all pages show hits though comparatively few people utilise the message board or the e-mail link to contact.

    The 13 enquiries were almost all from people who could not find an immediate link to the various well-documented family lines.  This is usually because it is through a female marriage that they cannot link into the male lines.  Only rarely do researchers have any substantive information, I find, and in the past year I have only received information of any depth on Kuxhausen, Schmunk and Sterkel families.  Other enquiries have been on Dietz, Ziegler (2 enquirers), Schneider, Reizenstein (2 enquirers), Fischer, Wittman, Seifert, Hilderman and Maier (this last though a village name was not from Rosenberg).

    Professor Richard McGregor
    University of Cumbria

    Halton near Lancaster, UK

    Rosenberg Village Coordinator

     

  • Rosenfeld, North Caucasus

 

  • Rosenheim, Samara, Volga

 

  • Rothammel, Saratov, Volga

 

  • Schaffhausen
    Schaffhausen V.C. 2008 Annual Report

    Introduction
    Schaffhausen was one of the original 106 or so "Mother Colonies” established between 1764 and 1772 along the Volga River near Saratov. The colonists were assigned to settlements according to their religion and Schaffhausen is listed as a Lutheran colony.

    Schaffhausen was founded on 13 August 1767 and was among a group of 13 colonies established in the vicinity of the Little Karaman River situated inland from the eastern bank of the Volga.  Due to poor soil conditions Schaffhausen and another 7 colonies were relocated to the northern stretch of the eastern Volga riverbank in 1770.  Schaffhausen was the northernmost of these original Volga river colonies.

    Enquiries
    During the past year I have been in correspondence with one other Schaffhausen descendant, who is a member of AHSGR.  There have been no other enquiries.

    On a more personal note I was able to identify a branch of my family (origin Schaffhausen) in Russia.  I managed to contact a sole female still living in Russia and was informed that the rest of the family had emigrated to Germany in 1990.  Although I have not been able to contact them it was heartening to know that a branch of the family had survived the travails faced by Volga Germans.

    Tasks completed
    A village handout was submitted for display at the 2008 AHSGR Convention.

    I have purchased all available census data and, after resolving spelling variations, have a database of about 60 family surnames.

    Identified future needs
    The lack of enquiries was somewhat disappointing and indicates I need to increase publicity, perhaps by creating a web page.

    I have identified a need to acquire more recent census data, at least from the latter part of the
    19th century, to assist the construction of a more complete and contemporary village list. Initial enquiries have not been successful in obtaining relevant data.

    I am contemplating making enquiries among the German community in Australia to try to stimulate interest among any GR descendants living here.

    I am happy to continue in the role of Schaffhausen VC role and feel that now is the time to make a concerted effort to acquire and collate as much data on villages as possible and preserve it at AHSGR.

    This will enable future generations to know and preserve their heritage.

    Regards,

    Jim Parsonage

    Schaffhausen Village Coordinator

    Brisbane, Australia

     
  • Schilling, Samara, Volga

 

  • Schilling, Saratov, Volga

 

  • Schlangendorf, Swedish Colonies, Nikolaev and Kherson
    2008 Old Swedish Villages Report

    Villages of Alt-Schwedendorf, Mühlhausendorf, Schlangendorf, and Klosterdorf.

     I received inquiries on family names of Buch, Meier, Rexin, Oppenlaender, Hein, Specht within the villages and with the help of fellow researchers of these villages have helped them to further their research.

    I have also received inquiries from a university student in Ukraine who is interested in researching the history of these villages since it is still an unresearched topic to this day.  The University of Alberta has also recently embraced this area's unique history which can be found in English on www.svenskbyborna.com under Canadian.   Jörgen Hedman has written the story from a Swedish viewpoint but the German experience is still the same.

    These villages represent a unique diaspora that are a crossover of cultures and, as a result, have been, by the large part, rejected, by the Swedes and Germans alike because they do not fit into either ethnic group.

    I had an inquiry about a mailing list for a newsletter but since these colonies have not had a coordinator for so long, and the villages are so small, and the Germans have not been resident in the villages for so many years, there are very few inquiries.

    I was mistaken about attending the German Lutheran Church in Mühlhausendorf in 2007, it was actually in Schlangendorf.  There is only one German family that lives in the village today.  They were banned from returning to this area when the German army rescued them in 1944/1945 and took them to camps in Poland.  It is very possible that the church will close in the coming years.

    I have written a book about the immigration of the villagers from the Swedish villages to North America between 1889 and 1931.  It traces their genealogy and pioneer history and can be ordered at www.swedesincanada.net.

    My great-uncle's memoirs about his life in the village from 1900-1929 is now complete and will be posted on the Svenskbyborna-Canadian website in January 2009.

    I continue to dedicate time to SOAR as my time permits.

    Respectfully submitted,
    Karen Wright

    Village Coordiator for Alt-Schwedendorf, Mühlhausendorf, Schlangendorf and Klosterdorf

     

  • Schönchen, Samara, Volga
    2008 Report for Schoenchen

    The village of Schoenchen, Russia was a Roman Catholic colony located near the Karshinaya Brook that flows on the Weinseite.  Distance from the colony to Saratov was 80 versta, 25 to Volsk, 4 to Wittman, and 2 to Zug.   The village no longer exists.

    We receive a minimum of inquiries from descendents of the village, but we continue to hope that our website will generate more interest in the future.   This year a couple of new ship passenger lists were added to our website based on these inquiries.

    Denise Grau and Terri Dann

    Village Coordinators for Schoenchen

     

  • Schöndorf, Samara, Volga
    2008 Village Report for Schoendorf

    We had about five inquiries about the people of Schoendorf this year.
     
    Laurin Wilhelm
    V.C. for Pobochnoye, Sconedorf, Schoenfeld, Schoental, New  Yagodnaya, Strassendorf

     

  • Schönfeld, Samara, Volga
    2008 Village Report for Schoenfeld

    Schoenfeld was founded in 1856 some 65 miles ESE of Saratov, or 100 miles ESE of the mother village Pobochnoye.
     
    I had about 10-12 inquiries about folks or historical information about Schoenfeld.
     
    Laurin P. Wilhelm
    V.C. for Pobochnoye, Schoenndorf, Schoenfeld, Schoental, New  Yagodnaya and Strassendorf.

     

  • Schöntal, Samara, Volga
    2008 Village Report for Schoental

    Schoental (Pretty Valley) was located some 65 miles ESE of Saratov or 100 miles ESE of its mother villages Pobochnoye and Yagodnaya Polyana.
     
    I received one inquiry about the Fuchs family that lived in Schoental and moved to Otis, Kansas circa 1910.
     
    Laurin Wilhelm
    V.C. for Pobochnoye, Schoendorf, Schoenfeld, Schoental, New  Yagodnaya and Strassendorf.

     

  • Schuck, Saratov, Volga
    2008 Annual Report for the Village of Schuck

    We have had three requests for help with surnames this year.  We provided all the information that we have.  We never had a response from the people asking for help, so we have no way of knowing if our information was useful.

    Lola Stattelman

    Schuck Village Coordinator 

     

  • Schulz
    2008 Annual Village Report for Schulz

    In the last year I have received several queries for the Gross, Weber and Zitzer families associated with the village of Schulz (on the Karaman River).  Research data was prepared and provided to the researcher along with a village map.  I also have been collecting obituaries from our local newspaper for the last 20 years.  This has been made into a database for the greater Sheboygan, Wisconsin area.

    Village Coordinator handouts were prepared for the 2008 International Convention and sent to Randi Bolyard to be included in the display for the Northern Volga Villages table. This material consisted of a Village history, available Schulz records, and excerpts from two book projects that I have been working on.  The first one is titled "Our Ancestral Home - Jacob Zitzer" and the other is called "Over the Washline".  It contains antidotes about various villagers on the Village map.  It brings life to the map.

    I have contacted Brent Mai about the 1834 and 1850/57 censuses.  He told me that something from the village of Neu-Schulz was possibly available.  I have to finalize a request form for him for the translation of these village censuses.  It might also be for the mother colony of Schulz.

    Genealogy is but one of my hobbies.  I continue to update my files and am willing to work with those who contact me.

    Fred Zitzer

    Schulz Village Coordinator

     
  • Schwab, Saratov, Volga
    2008 Village Report for Schwab

    The Village of Schwab is one of the smaller villages with very little activity.

    I have had five queries in the last twelve months and two of them were from previous correspondents.

    I still edit the newsletter for the Lower Volga Villages.

    Rolene Eichman Kiesling
    Schwab Village Coordinator

     

  • Seewald, Saratov, Volga

 

  • Shcherbakovka, Saratov, Volga
    2008 Village Report for Shcherbakovka

    I am the village coordinator for the village of Shcherbakovka (also known as Tscherbakowka).

    Shcherbakovka is part of the Lower Volga Village group and so more information can be found on our website that Gary Martens oversees.

    I had the opportunity to purchase the Lutheran Church records from our village (1809-1867) and have found tons of information in them.  I spent about nine months, full time, this year extracting those records.  I set up a new database in Family Tree Maker that includes only first-source information.  I started with the 1798 census, then when they became available, I added the 1834, 1850 and 1857 censuses.  I then merged all the individuals from the Pleve charts that have been received from our village.  Finally, I entered all the births (really the baptisms), marriages and deaths that I found in the church records.  I am very proud that this has turned out to be a database that ties a lot of families together.  That database includes 7307 individuals and 1448 marriages.

    In going through the church records line by line, I have also found 259 additions or corrections to the Pleve charts for our village.  If any of you have purchased these charts, please email me and I will be happy to send you the list of additions & corrections for your chart.  The surnames and number of corrections/additions are:   Becker, 10; Dalinger, 3; Ehrlich, 47; Haffner 19; Hanschu, 10; Kraft, 9;

    Laubhan, 12; Meier #418 chart, 61; Oblander, 10; Reisig, 12; Steinert, 3; Stricker, 8; Wasenmuller, 21;

    Winter, 16; and Zwetzig, 18.

    I am researching Laubhan, Wassenbiller, Meier, Nuss, Hanschu and Haffner from Shcherbakovka, Saratov, Russia, and Batt and Baum from Frank, Saratov and Brunnenthal, Samara, Russia.

    Janet Laubhan Flickinger
    Village Coordinator for Shcherbakovka

     

  • Solodyri, Volynsk, Volhynia U

 

  • Stahl am Tarlyk, Samara, Volga
    2008 Village Report for Stahl am Tarlyk

    I have received three inquiries for the people of the village of Stahl am Tarlyk.
     
    There are over 8,000 entries in the Stahl am Tarlyk database and it continues to grow. The 1834 census has helped in some inquiries.
     
    A copy of this annual report is sent along to people who have made inquires to this village and this, sometimes, generates some interest and inquires.
     
    The presentation of the German Brotherhood was given at the  Casper Convention and a copy of this religious home life was entered into the  Stahl am Tarlyk files in Lincoln, Nebraska.
     
    The Volgograd reservoir was filled from 1958 until 1961.  This means that construction began a few years earlier. The village is now located to a higher place and the original Stahl am Tarlyk is under water.  Pictures taken a few years ago show little advancement with this village.
     
    Paul Koehler

    Village Coordinator for Stahl am Tarlyk

     

  • Strassendorf, Samara, Volga
    2008 Village Report for Strassendorf

    Strassendorf was located about 100 miles SE of Saratov.
     
    I received no inquiries about this village this year.
     
    Laurin Wilhelm
    V.C. for Pobochnoye, Schoendorf, Schoenfeld, Schoental, New  Yagodnaya,  and Strassendorf

     

  • Straub, Samara, Volga
    2008 Straub Report

    I have had the following inquiries for Straub this year:  Metzler (2), Schwabenland.

    I have asked Brent Mai (who has been able to obtain lots of census records from Russia) for help in getting any Straub census the Engels archive can find.

    I continue getting copies of obituaries of people who were born in Straub.  I now have 250.

    Bob Lembke visited Straub in May 2007.  He gave me copies of pictures he took while he was in the village.  I am using these pictures in my Straub newsletter.

    I received Doos genealogy information from Bill Doos whose ancestors were from Straub.  I also received some Schwabenland family Straub census information from Beth Davenport, Jost VC, who has a Schwabenland ancestor from Straub.

    I have found EWZ records (World War II German war records) of 32 Straub families.  It took 5 months to find them as all the microfilm is not at the Family History Library in Salt Lake City.  Most of it I needed was in the vault and had to be ordered.  The FHL microfilm numbers are different than the ones listed for the National Archives on the Odessa 3 website.  I searched by phonetic German to find the records.  The FHL only has microfilm for two of the three records: the basic card index (Einwandererkartei) and the family form (Stämblatter).  The FHL does not have the basic application forms (Andräge) on microfilm. The EWZ files often have information on three generations (if the person who gave the information knew who their ancestors were).  I have EWZ records for the following Straub families:  Batz, Baude, Bopp, Doos (2), Gerhardt, Henkel, Isheim, Karle (3), Maul, Metzler (2), Öhlenschlager, Ries, Roth, Rudolf (2), Schafer (2), Scharton, Scherer, Schmidt, Schuetz, Straub (4), Will, Winter (2).

    I hope to compile the EWZ records in a book.  I have sent copies of the EWZ records to 2 families whose ancestors are in these records:   Doos, now living in Russia, and Metzler, now living in Germany.  The Doos family member was born in 1933 and was listed on his mother's record.  He wasn't old enough to have one of his own.  I have been told he was very excited to get his mother's record (with a picture) and his grandmother's (also with a picture) from 1944.

    Sharon White

    Straub Village Coordinator

     

  • Swedish Colonies, Nikolaev and Kherson

 

 

  • Volhynia
    Polish Volhynia 2008 Report

    As of October 2008, I have been Village Coordinator for Polish Volhynia for one year and it has been a learning experience for me.  Leona Janke has been very helpful in getting me started and nurturing me along as a Village Coordinator.  Although there was no Heritage Hall display for Volhynia at the Joint Convention in Casper, a group of six met together informally on Village night.  Two were experienced and shared information about their families.  One of the participants needed help finding the village of her ancestors, and two others had hit a brick wall in their genealogy.  I brought resource books and maps for Polish Volhynia but found that resources from other parts of Volhynia were also needed.  I have begun to put together a list of library resources found in Lincoln, Nebraska.  Recent sad news is
    that Ewald Wuschke, a long time Volhynian genealogist has passed away.  He was publisher of the "Wandering Volhynians" Magazine.  Our thoughts and prayers go out to his son.

    Mabel Kiessling
    Polish Volhynia Village Coordinator

 

 

  • 2008 Village Coordinator Report for Walter and Walter Khutor

    Jean A. Roth and Mary Mills, Village Coordinators

    Walter is one of the original 104 "mother colonies" in the Volga located west of Saratov.  It is in the Canton of Frank.  Its daughter colony, Walter Khutor, was located across the Medveditza River to the north.  Little remains in Walter but Walter Khutor is still a thriving Russian community.

    Mary Mills and I have been busy this year on a variety of projects.  Our Walter web site is active and continues to add new material.  We had a village display at the 2008 Convention and we hope to be able to attend the 2009 Convention in Medicine Hat.

    Mary maintains our database which has over 35,000 entries and answers requests.  I have been working on the Village history and origins in Germany.  Unfortunately, Walter is missing critical census records for the mid-19th century but we have hope for the future.   Due to the efforts of Frank VC, Doris Evans, we are finally obtaining a mass of records for the village that were in the Volgograd Archives.  They are in the midst of being translated and once they arrive we will figure out how to make them available. We still need substantial sums of money donated from Walter people to pay for them.

    Dr. Brent Mai from Center of Volga German Studies at Concordia University in Portland has also obtained material for a number of villages, including Walter, which he is translating.  Our Council of Northwest Chapters (CNC) is helping to support his activities although much more money is needed.

    We are also working on a photo archive for the Village.  Tanja Schell from Germany and a professional photographer have recently traveled to Walter and have taken extraordinary pictures, some of which have been posted on the web site.  We are working on obtaining more.  Some pictures recently
    obtained include old pictures taken in Walter that have survived the 1941 relocation to Eastern Russia. While there, they noted a large fire that went through the village grassland and hit the cemetery.  The Church is still standing and for the first time we have interior shots.

    We just obtained over 20 letters from Jim Klippert which were sent between the Klippert family members during the 1920's and 1930's from Walter that describe the famine and people who lived in Walter at that time.

    Jean A. Roth
    Seattle, WA

 

  • Walter Khutor, Saratov, Volga

    2008 Village Coordinator Report for Walter and Walter Khutor

    Jean A. Roth and Mary Mills, Village Coordinators

    Walter is one of the original 104 "mother colonies" in the Volga located west of Saratov.  It is in the Canton of Frank.  Its daughter colony, Walter Khutor, was located across the Medveditza River to the north.  Little remains in Walter but Walter Khutor is still a thriving Russian community.

    Mary Mills and I have been busy this year on a variety of projects.  Our Walter web site is active and continues to add new material.  We had a village display at the 2008 Convention and we hope to be able to attend the 2009 Convention in Medicine Hat.

    Mary maintains our database which has over 35,000 entries and answers requests.  I have been working on the Village history and origins in Germany.  Unfortunately, Walter is missing critical census records for the mid-19th century but we have hope for the future.   Due to the efforts of Frank VC, Doris Evans, we are finally obtaining a mass of records for the village that were in the Volgograd Archives.  They are in the midst of being translated and once they arrive we will figure out how to make them available. We still need substantial sums of money donated from Walter people to pay for them.

    Dr. Brent Mai from Center of Volga German Studies at Concordia University in Portland has also obtained material for a number of villages, including Walter, which he is translating.  Our Council of Northwest Chapters (CNC) is helping to support his activities although much more money is needed.

    We are also working on a photo archive for the Village.  Tanja Schell from Germany and a professional photographer have recently traveled to Walter and have taken extraordinary pictures, some of which have been posted on the web site.  We are working on obtaining more.  Some pictures recently
    obtained include old pictures taken in Walter that have survived the 1941 relocation to Eastern Russia. While there, they noted a large fire that went through the village grassland and hit the cemetery.  The Church is still standing and for the first time we have interior shots.

    We just obtained over 20 letters from Jim Klippert which were sent between the Klippert family members during the 1920's and 1930's from Walter that describe the famine and people who lived in Walter at that time.

    Jean A. Roth
    Seattle, WA

 

  • Warenburg, Samara, Volga
    2008 VC Report - Warenburg

    I have had inquiries about these Warenburg families this year:  Bier, Kinzel (2), Kramer, Krikau, Lorenz, Roth, Schmall, Simon, Stumpf, Valentin, and Yost.

    I continue to find obituaries of people who were born in Warenburg.  I now have 368.

    Jake Leisle let me borrow copies of his 8 hours of interviews with Marie Leisle Doering, who was born in Warenburg in 1926.  I have made copies for myself and will transcribe the interviews.  I will use the information in future issues of the Warenburg newsletters.  Marie had vivid memories of her childhood in Warenburg, life in Alexanderwohl, and life in Germany during WWII after being captured by the Germans while escaping from Russia.  Marie lived through some hard times and shared her stories.

    The most important genealogy news is that the 1834 Warenburg census is now available.  You can buy a copy from Brent Mai.  The cost is $50 which includes shipping.  I have asked Brent for help in getting the 1858 Warenburg census.

    Bob Lembke visited Warenburg in May 2007.  He gave me copies of pictures he took in the village.  I am using the pictures in my Warenburg newsletters.

    I have found EWZ records (World War II German war records) of 87 families from Warenburg.  It took 5 months to find the microfilm reels at the Family History Library in Salt Lake City.  Not all of the microfilm is at the FHL--most of the microfilm I needed was in the vault and had to be ordered.  The FHL microfilm numbers are different than the ones listed on the Odessa 3 list.  The Odessa 3 list has the microfilm numbers and page number for EWZ files that are at the National Archives.  I searched the FHL microfilm by phonetic German to find the records.  The FHL only has two of the three EWZ records on microfilm:  the basic card index (Einwandererkartei) and the family form (Stämblatter).  The FHL does not have the basic application form (Andräge).  The EWZ files often have information on three generations of the family.  I have an EWZ record for a number of the following Warenburg families:  Andrejas, Arndt (2), Arnst, Becker (4), Bier, Brem, Brott, Diener (4), Eisner (7), Freund, Funkner (2), Gebert, Gerhardt, Göbel, Grassmück, Hartwig (2), Hoppe, Konstanz (3), Kraft, Kramer (2), Krutsch, Lehmann, Leisle (4), Leonhardt, Lindt, Lorenz, Klein, Kreüter, Meisner, Majer, Molko, Nickel (2), Michel, Mueller (4), Pfeifer, Schmall (2), Schmidt (2), Schmunk, Schneider, Schönmeier, Shütz (5), Schwengel, Seibert, Simon (2), Stumpf (3), Trippel, Usinger, Valtin, Wagenleitner (3).  In the future, I hope to compile these records in a book.

     Sharon White

    Warenburg Village Coordinator

     

  • Wiesenmüller, Samara, Volga
    2008 VC Annual Report for the Village of Wiesenmueller, Samara, Russia

    Upon checking my VC message folder I find that from November 2007 to this date I have a total of 225 messages. Not all were directly concerned with Wiesenmueller.  Some were queries for other villages where the VC was not responsive.

    Betty Ashley, also a Village Coordinator for Wiesenmueller, sent me boxes of her paper files in November 2007 and I spent a month putting the information into a Wiesenmueller database and combined her information with data I had on hand myself.  The database now contains 6,887 persons related to the Wiesenmueller first settlers. I am currently searching SOAR surname by surname for Wiesenmueller folk to add to the database.

    This year I was able to obtain Marriage Lists for 1894 and 1895 for the village and I published them on the GR List and Sue Kottwitz posted them on the Jeruslan Nachrichten Website.  This generated a number of queries.

    I was further able to obtain the 1913 Birth/Baptismal records for Wiesenmueller.  This list was also published on the GR List and Sue Kottwitz posted it to the Jeruslan Nachrichten Website.  This again generated a number of queries.

    I am unable to purchase any further data because I've gotten everything that the Volgograd Archive had on Wiesenmueller.  There are yet many years of data concerning Wiesenmueller in the Saratov and Engels Archives but like food in the Famine Years, cost prohibits any purchase.

    I have made no effort to ascertain whether those queries were from AHSGR members or non-members. I am satisfied that anyone using the GR listservice is well aware of AHSGR and does not need any further urging to join the organization.

    Sue Kottwitz and Betty Ashley are both alive and well and still working on genealogy.  I would urge folks to look at the Jeruslan Nachrichten Website.  Sue Kottwitz has overhauled it and added much new information.  Hopefully, she'll be able to post some of the families in the Wiesenmueller database to the website.

    I continue to maintain contact with some "Late Returnees" in Germany.  Their attitudes are the same found here...only a few are interested in their genealogy.  I get excited when I find a distant relative whose family managed to survive through all the hardships in Russia.  It is a "puzzlement" to me that the same excitement is not universally shared by all GR folk.

    Hugh Lichtenwald

    Wiesenmueller Village Coordinator

     

  • Wittman (Soloturn), Samara, Volga
    2008 Village Report for Wittmann

    I have not received many e-mails on this colony.

    This colony is situated in the Northern Volga area with many of the other Catholic colonies and shares the parish of Schoenchen.  The church records that I received from Wittmann are listed below.  Since this colony was part of the Schoenchen Parish I'm also listing the church records that I received from Schoenchen because they overlap.

    Marriages:
         1840 (Schoenchen) complete
         1858 (Schoenchen) complete
         1887 (Schoenchen) not complete
         1896 (Schoenchen) not complete
         1897 (Schoenchen) not complete


    Kevin Rupp
    Wittmann Village Coordinator

     

  • Worms
    2008 Village Report for Worms

    Since I am new to the job the only thing I have been able to complete is to provide AHSGR with detailed descriptions of life in Worms and information on the original settlers and settlement.  They were taken from my recently completed book “The German Russians”.

    Jim Griess

    Village Coordinator for Worms

     

  • Yagodnaya Polyana, Saratov, Volga
    2008 Village Report for Yagodnaya Polyana

    Yagodnaya Polyana is located about 40 miles northwest of Saratov. It is served by three village co-coordinators: Kris Ball, Elizabeth Meyer, and Patrice Miller.
     
    In 2008 we continued to see a steady stream of inquiries which we attended to as quickly as we could. Kris Ball attended the AHSGR/GRHS joint convention in Casper, Wyoming.  In lieu of a formal Village Night, one of our villagers found a nice empty room and around 15 descendants from Yagodnaya Polyana and her daughter and granddaughter villages shared information, pictures, memories, and homemade German rye bread.  Laurin Wilhelm, VC from Pobotchnaya and other daughter villages, baked the rye bread himself.  He also brought to the convention his cousin, Alexander Wilhelm and his wife who live in Speyer, Germany.  Alexander and his family were deported to the Ukraine in the 1940's, and he enjoyed meeting distant relatives in the United States.  Kenny Stugart shared stories and pictures of his 2008 visit to YP and Saratov.  Donna Jones also made a trip to Yagodnaya Polyana in May, 2008 and brought pictures to show us.  One special speaker at the convention was Pastor Alexander Scheierman from Saratov, Russia.  Pastor Scheierman's family was from Yagodnaya Polyana, and he gave two presentations about his ministry in Russia and about the church the Lutheran Church which is under construction in Saratov. 
     
    Two issues of Usu Leut, the village newsletter, were published this year.  They included heartbreaking letters from villagers in Yagodnaya Polyana asking for help from families in the US during the Russian famine years.  These were translated for us by Hugh Lichtenwald, and we are grateful for his help!  They were a reminder of the troubles that many of our ancestors had to endure during those hard times in Russia.
     
    We hope to have at least one Village Coordinator at the 2009 AHSGR Convention in Medicine Hat, Canada.  Many YP descendants immigrated to Calgary in the last century and still live in the area, so Yagodnaya Polyana will undoubtedly be well-represented at the convention.  Next year in Usu Leut, we will publish some valuable transcriptions of conversations that Richard Scheuerman sent us from interviews with people who lived in Yagodnaya Polyana.  As the years fly by, we encourage everyone to talk with older family members and write down memories they have.  When those family members are gone, the memories should not end with them.  We are happy to receive those stories and to preserve them for future generations.

    Kris Ball

    Village Co-Coordinator for Yagodnaya Polyana

     

  • Zug (Gattung), Samara, Volga
    2008 Village Report for Zug

    I have received only a few e-mails from people wanting information on the colony of Zug which is part of the Northern Volga Catholic Colonies.  The contacts that did come in were people willing to share information.  Some had some old photographs from the colony of families who lived there at the time.  These families were Stecklein and Lattigan.

    I did receive some church records from this village as well this year.  Some records were complete and some were not.

    They include:

         Baptism records from 1880-1882.
         Marriages records (complete) 1897
         Marriage records (not complete) 1887

    I currently keep a data base of all my colonies and it now contains 84,620 names.

    Kevin Rupp

    Zug Village Coordinator