Village Coordinator Annual Reports 2009

Villages A-F

| A | B | C D | E | F |

Villages G-L

| G | H | J | K | L |

Villages M-R

| M | N | O | P | R |

Villages S-Z

| S | T | V | W | Y | Z |

VC Newsletter Editor Michael Frank


 

  • Ährenfeld / Aehrenfeld, Saratov, Volga
     
    2009 Village Report for Ährenfeld / Aehrenfeld, Saratov, Volga

    This year, the research community for the Wiesenseite daughter colony of Aehrenfeld has been rather quiet.  A listing of the original settlers there was discovered to have been filmed in 2003 by the LDS from the archives in Samara, Russia - north of the traditional Volga German area (International Film No. 2379339).  Resettlement occurred from Bauer, Dietel, Doenhof, Franzosen, Hussenbach, Kratzke, and Merkel with the largest number of them coming from Kratzke.  This information has been extracted and will be made available shortly.

    Brent Mai
    Aehrenfeld Colony Research Coordinator

    AHSGR Life Member since 1983


     

  • Alexanderfeld, North Caucasus
     

 

  • Alexandertal (Neu-Schilling), Saratov, Volga
     

    2009 Village Report for Alexandertal

    Oct. 2008-Oct.2009

    For Alexandertal this was the busiest and most exciting year in a long time!  It started badly.  I experienced a computer crash, a new computer and a new operating system.  This new operating system eliminated my ability to update our Alexandertal website.  The VC of our parent colony (Gary Martens, Schilling VC) came riding to our rescue, created a new Alexandertal web-site, and will update it until I learn how to do that myself. The new site although still somewhat abbreviated is: www.alexandertal.org.

    Several inquiries and new bits of information were received, but I should highlight the
    work of Nancy Lytle of Brandon, Canada.  She has obtained copies of, and placed on disk, confirmation and birth records from Christ Lutheran Church of Winnipeg. For some families these contain dates going back into Alexandertal!  Nancy’s focus is the Stattler family. She needs someone to translate these records which could be a great boon to Alexandertal research.  Are there any volunteers?

    Finally, some Alexandertal marriage records for 1901-1902 have been found.  Gary
    Martens is ordering them because they include lots of information on Schilling families. Gary needs help in paying for them.

    Here is a copy of his first announcement:

    I am considering the purchase of available Alexandertal birth records from the Russian Archives at Volgograd. The only birth records (available so far) cover the years 1901-1902, and there are approximately 1000 entries. Each birth record includes the birth date and/or the baptism date, and the full names of the father and mother.

    As I have done with the purchase of birth records for the villages of Dobrinka and Galka, I am asking for each person who is interested to contribute towards this purchase, in this case $50. Contributing will entitle you to a copy of the translated birth records. If you want a copy of the entire untranslated birth records, I will have to charge $10 extra for copying charges and postage. I'll send you a few individual pages at no charge.

    Complete records will only be available to those people who contribute now to this purchase. People who do not so contribute will be charged $50 for the translated birth records for just one surname.

    If you are interested in helping with this important purchase, please send me an
    email (gpmartens@sbcglobal.net) and let me know your interest in contributing.
     

    Checks or money orders for contributions can be sent to:

              Gary Martens
              1045 Albatross Lane
              Aubrey, TX 76227-3559


    So for a $50 donation now, you will get full translations. This is a deal and will be a great contribution to Alexandertal family research. I have pitched in. Can you too please?

    Dick Kraus

    Village Coordinator for Alexandertal

 

  • Alt-Danzig, Kirovograd
     

     

  • Alt-Schilling Saratov, Volga

 

  • Alt-Schwedendorf, Swedish Colonies, Nikolaev and Kherson

     
  • Amilchin (Emilchin, Emilcin, Amilcin) Volhynia,
    Ukraine, Russia

 

  • Anton, Saratov, Volga
     

     

  • 2009 Village Report for Balzer

    2009 was an active year for the Balzer group.   We received a number of email
    queries from Russia, Germany, South America, Canada, and the U.S. We were
    able to help many of these researchers to trace their ancestors, sometimes
    back to the roots in Germany or to others researching the same surnames.

    Two important new documents were added to our growing library of Balzer
    documents.   This included the addendum to the 1857 census of which Brent Mai
    kindly informed us. It lists those colonists who were sent to daughter colonies.  The second unique document was provided by headquarters.  It is a list of people sending relief packages to Balzer during the 1923 famine.  Jacob Volz was instrumental in arranging this delivery.   Not only does the list name the sender but it also lists the recipients in Balzer who had to sign for the package.   Both of these documents now need to be translated.

    The German origins of a few more Balzer settlers were added to the known list. This includes the families of Christoph Carl, Jacob Herzog, and Philipp Leichner.   We are looking for help finding more ancestors in Germany.

    A presentation was given at the Medicine Hat convention and another lecture is planned for January 2010 in the San Francisco area.

    On the down side, my heavy workload all year has prevented the publishing of any new issues of the Balzer/Moor newsletter.   I’m looking for a new general editor.


    Wayne H. Bonner

    Village Coordinator for Balzer

     

  • Bangert, Samara, Volga
     

    2009 Village Report for Bangert
     
    I have received three inquires for the village of Bangert this past year. I was able to help two of these inquires in their search. The Bangert data base continues to grow at a slower pace.

     
    I received information about fishing in the Volga River during the famine.  Here is the story about it:

    THE GIANT CATFISH OF THE VOLGA RIVER, RUSSIA
    Alex Huber of Nurenberg, Germany writes to Paul Koehler on October 31, 2009:

    My Grandmother, Berta Huber (1912-2002) told me that the beginning of the 1920’s was extremely lean in Bangert, Russia, they had almost nothing to eat. The only salvation was the men fishing the Volga River. Her uncle Peter Huber once caught a giant catfish, many feet long.  The family ate themselves full one time.

    Peter’s signature is on a letter of appreciation (1923) from the village of Bangert to the Volga Relief Society and to some of their relatives who were living in North  America at the time.

    The Wels Catfish is a scaleless freshwater and brackish water catfish, recognizable by its broad flat head and wide mouth. The mouth contains lines of numerous small teeth, two long barbells on the upper jaw and four shorter barbells on the lower jaw. It has a long anal fin that extends to the caudal fin and a small sharp dorsal fin positioned relatively forward.  It uses its sharp pectoral fins to capture prey. With these fins, it creates an eddy to disorient its victim, which it simply engulfs in its enormous throat. It has very slippery green-brown skin. Its belly is pale yellow or white.  Wels Catfish can live for at least thirty years and have very good hearing.  The female produces up to 30,000 eggs. The male guards the nest until the brood hatches, which depending on water temperature, can take from three to ten days. If the water level decreases too much or too fast the male has been observed to splash the eggs with its muscular tail in order to keep them wet.  The Wels Catfish lives on worms, insects, crustacean and fish. The larger ones also eat frogs, mice, rats and aquatic birds such as a duck.


    These catfish live in large water lakes and deep, slow moving rivers such as the Volga. It prefers to remain in sheltered locations such as holes in the river bed, sunken trees, etc. It consumes its food in the open water or on the bottom.


    Tell the stories.

    Paul Koehler

    Village Coordinator for Bangert and Stahl am Tarlyk

     

  • Bergdorf, Glückstal, Odessa, Kherson

 

  • Borodino, Bessarabia
     

    2009 Village Report for Borodino, Bessarabia

    2009 has been another productive year.  Like 2007-2008, more and more descendants of the Borodinians around the world are discovering my web site, which is very good news.  It has been listed in the Heidelberg University web site and other sites as well as other organizations around the world.

    The genealogy continues to grow every week and I cannot even begin to tell everyone who have been so generous how much others and I appreciate everyone’s efforts.

    For those who have not visited the site I have different methods of dealing with the family charts. I have gone into the records and placed them onto the site as-is. There are no corrections, deletions, or speculations. They are what they are. Then I took these names and tried to match children with their parents, and I have clearly marked these as speculations. The next part contains the family charts of people who have sent me their information which may be the same or slightly different from the records. I've then placed all my e-mails and letters under each section. There are names from A to Z. There are individual family pages with stories, letters, and photographs.

    Connected to this are my own personal ties to Borodino through both my maternal grandparents, Ludwig Michaelovich Hein and Christina Schweikert (Schweigert/Schweickert). Both were born in 1885 in Borodino. I knew them both and heard many stories about Borodino and nearby villages. To add to this, my paternal side was also German-Russian who settled in and around Worms/Odessa, South Russia. By the time I found most of my ancestors, I discovered their lives and migrations cover the area from Bessarabia to Tifilis in the Caucasus Mountains. It has been a great adventure and I have shared much of it with you.

    My husband's families, (Hubert, Jost, Goetz, and Hummel) were also German but ended up in and around Temesvar and Arad in Romania. Because of this, I've learned about an area where some of our German-Russians may have stopped for a time before continuing to Russia. One family of mine, the Pfaffs did just this, before heading to the Odessa area.


    I have many kinds of maps. I've lost count. I must have hundreds of photographs. When you have time, please stop by and take a look at my web sites. Who knows, you might find ancestors or information of interest.

    My German-Russian House Recipe site continues to grow because of all the generous people who have contributed.  It includes not only recipes, but it's also filled with photographs with German-Russians who have traveled back into Borodino and taken photographs. I've tried to discover what food was eaten while our ancestors lived in Borodino and some recipes show step-by-step ways to cook a particular food. Some people have sent photographs to me of their favorite cook, like their grandmothers or aunts. Many people have already set up websites and therefore there are a huge number of links.
     

    A comment is needed to those whom I've failed to reply this last year.  Due to my aging parents and adding an addition to our home, I may not be replying as quickly as I have in the past. But I will reply and get YOUR Borodino family's page up and running as soon as I'm able.  Please, e-mail me, again, if I haven't contacted you by January 1, 2010.

    Again, I'd also like to thank Ingrid Ruele who has gone into the records in places where I never could have reached and has willingly
    shared.  Steve Mogck’s web site has been a real treasure.  He's not returned my e-mails, but that doesn't prevent me from thanking him for all his hard work here and now.  Of course, there are far too many names to mention here.  They are mentioned on my web
    sites.

    There are always misspellings, typos and errors so if you discover any, please contact me.  All additions are welcome!

    Judy Remmick-Hubert
    Village Coordinator for Borodino


     

     

  • Brabander, Samara, Volga
    .

    2009 Village Report for Brabander

    It has been an extremely busy and rewarding year for Brabander Colony research.  Since November of 2008, we have received the 1834 Brabander census translation transcribed in English by Professor Brent Mai.  Early in 2009 Professor Mai informed me that there were sixteen LDS microfilms available from the Mormon library in Salt Lake City, Utah with 1850 and 1857 Volga German census records that included records for both colonies that I serve, Brabander and Dehler.  Initially I ordered only the microfilm for Brabander and Dehler, but I now have all sixteen LDS microfilm housed at the Newberry Library in Chicago on permanent loan from the LDS Library in Salt Lake City, Utah.  I have also ordered five additional LDS microfilms with the 1834 Census Records.  Since there are five AHSGR Village Coordinators in the Chicago Area and three of them do not have village censuses after 1798, these census records should prove valuable for research.

     The 1850 and 1857 Brabander censuses have been translated and will be available as soon as an index can be formatted.  In addition to the census records for 1834, 1850, and 1857 for Brabander we are finally receiving some Brabander church records. Last week I heard the promising news that a series of Catholic "Wiesenseite" church records had been discovered in the LDS microfilm index.  I located several microfilms that have Brabander and Dehler data and I have ordered them for research. The microfilms are not well indexed and it is still unknown exactly what is on them.  I have noted that there is more than Catholic church data.  I have found Baptist church data also in the index for these microfilms.

    There is still only one family chart, the Abt Family Chart, produced by Dr. Igor Pleve, PhD for the village.  Charts for the Bondank, Fuhr and Schwalje families were ordered from Dr. Pleve in January 2006. An order for additional family charts was not accepted. These family charts were promised in 1 to 1 1/2 years, but we have been anxiously awaiting their arrival for four years.

     I already have more than 75% of the data that will eventually appear on the three charts.  I have also corrected several errors and connected three lines on the Abt family chart with family information that was not available to Dr. Pleve when he drew the Abt chart. The Fuhr chart will include the family lines from Rothammel, Dehler, and Brabander.  The Schwalje chart will include family lines in both Brabander and Dehler.  Currently I can create a substantial portion of a family chart for any Brabander family.

    I have received many photos of Brabander families that were exiled to Kazakhstan. I am in contact with many of the families. I have received a list of "Spitznahmen" (nick names) for the Schwalje family. I am awaiting Braun and Schwalje church records for Brabander Colony.

    There is an Eberhardt family genealogy being written by Professor Alexander Eberhardt and his cousins Michael Bergen, and Lydia Eberhardt. It will be a welcome addition for the Brabander colony descendants.

    I continue to receive hundreds of e-mails from relatives and allied family members from Brabander each year in Spanish, German, English, and Russian.  If you have Brabander colony ancestry, please contact me.   Please note that since I have ancestry in Rothammel, Seewald, Preuss, Hölzel and Seelmann, I have substantial information from those colonies as well. Since Hölzel, Seelmann, and Preuss are not represented by Village Coordinators I welcome inquiries for those colonies also.


    Jim Osborne
    Village Coordinator for Brabander

     

  • Brunnental, Samara, Volga
     

    2009 Village Report for Brunnental
     
    This year was a busy year again for the village of Brunnental/Brunnenthal.  I continue to find new families through my ongoing research using "Ancestry.com".   I've renewed my subscription for another year, as I'm still busy updating one family at a time with census information, military records, death records, passenger listings, etc.  This year we started
    getting access to Naturalization records and passport records, which gave us many interesting records to look over.

    I've said this before..... I keep thinking that I have found all of the families that emigrated from Brunnental, but I continue to find more and more each year!  With each family I find, I write letters to living members, asking for additional info and early photos of the families.  I currently have 46,000+ names in my Brunnental Database with extensive documentation on each family.  My big push for the upcoming year will be to GATHER PHOTOS!  I just sat down this morning to scan my own photos....what a job!!  In the
    past year we have discovered some of the most compelling photos, and know
    that often they are lost if we don't start "collecting them".

    I've put together a comprehensive list of all passenger lists of those from Brunnental.  As I find each of these families, I'm paying close attention to the notes regarding "nearest relative in county of origin", and "who they were going to see in US".  These have helped me pinpoint where they settled, and often provided clues to relationships to other relatives.  This comprehensive passenger listing can be found online at our Brunnental
    website.

    We have also put together a listing of all those Brunnentalers found within the WWI DRAFT REGISTRATION RECORDS which can be found online at Ancestry.com.  This listing of WWI Draft Registrations can also be found on our website.

    We also have an ongoing "listserv" through Rootsweb, where those who are interested in sharing information about Brunnental can "join", and then receive emails from anyone else who has also joined the list.  This is where I post such things as obituaries, passenger lists as I find them, or other interesting information about our village.  It's a great way to keep in touch with everyone, and only send ONE EMAIL to reach everyone.   You can
    join our listserv from the Brunnental webpage.
     

    AND NOW, FOR THE MANY THANK-YOUs


    Thanks to Brent Mai who just finished translation of records from the Samara Archives on the "Original Settlers to Brunnental" from the villages of Schilling, Grimm, Norka, Kolb, Walter and Pobochnaya.  This comes from LDS films of the records and matches up quite nicely from the lists we received back in 1997 by Vlad Soshnikov, which are for sale on the website for $10.

    Thanks to Ken Hartung who arranged to have a number of very interesting letters translated for the HARDT's from Brunnental.  The letters covered history from the years 1930-1940 and gave us an amazing peek into life in Brunnental during those terrible years.

    Many thanks for several people from Germany who continue to funnel great new information to me, and act as interpreters with those who write German.

            First is Viktor Klein who has handpicked many items off of the Russian webpage http://wolgadeutsche.net/.  If he sees anything concerning Brunnental, he acts as a go-between and helps me contact them and exchange information.  He just put me in touch with another part of my Gottmann family that now lives in Germany.  THANKS so much Viktor for all of your help!
            Second is Sergej Kindsvater who has been such a help over the past year with translation work, and research.
            Third is Heidi Ristau from Spain whose HARDT family from Brunnental has kept me on the "edge of my seat" for months!  What a story this woman has woven about her ancestors, and being part of that has been so inspirational.  Heidi has shared so many photos and stories, and weekly we are off on another quest for answers, each one giving me another peak into the history of Brunnental.   Her ability to speak a number of
    languages has made my job so much easier.

    Many thanks to Arlene (Lebsack) Rolfs in Kansas for all her help this year in translation work, and for her help with contacts in Germany.

    And a special THANKS to Irma (Greenwald) Waggoner in Nebraska who always sets me straight and has worked endless hours over the past years assisting me in making
    sense out of some of these families.  When I get stuck, she is always a help, and I consider her one half of the research team.

    Also many thanks to Doris (Eckhardt) Evans in WA, the Village Coordinator for Frank, and Jean Roth & Mary Mills, VC's for Walter, who have shared much of their information on "overlapping families" that started out in Frank and moved to Brunnental. They have helped me with many missing details, and have shared "Pleve Chart" information with me -- thanks gals!

    Thanks to Steve Schreiber who shared with me the site: http://imgsrc.ru/users/vovkakak which has photos taken by a photographer from Russia of the village of Brunnental.  If you look down through all the photos, you'll see some towards the bottom of the page which are described in English as Brunnental.  Click on that link and you'll come to two pages of photos of Brunnental today.

     I, of course, could not do any of this research without the help of all of the descendants from the village of Brunnental.  You are such an enthusiastic group of people, and you keep me motivated to continue to gather the history and genealogy of our village.  I consider it an honor to serve you.

    Sherrie (Gettman) Stahl
    AHSGR Village Coordinator for Brunnental, Samara, Volga, Russia

 

  • 2009 Village Report for Chasselois

    I knew when I added this village to the other villages in my care, that there might not be much activity and maybe not a lot to report each year.  Since several of the settlers who lived in this village escaped to Mariental and various other nearby villages when it was destroyed by the Kirghiz, I felt it needed a home with me.

    This will be another list of names to keep updated whenever I find new material.

    Thelma Mills

    Village Coordinator for Chasselois

     

  • Dehler, Saratav, Volga
     

    2009 Village Report for Dehler

    It has been another amazing year for Dehler colony research.  The 1834 census, translated and transcribed by Professor Brent Mai, arrived in November 2008. It helped resolve several questions about missing families in the 1850 Dehler census translated by Pavel Leuss and transcribed by Kevin Rupp. The 1850 census translation did not include the Trausch family or the Haag/Haagen family.  At least they were not recorded in the translation with those names.  The Trausch family was recorded as Fraum in household #28 in 1850. The 1834 census indicates that one of the two Trausch heads of household, Johannes Trausch migrated to Seelmann colony.  His brother Nicholaus remained in Dehler and is the progenitor for the entire Trausch lineage in Dehler after 1834.  The Haag/Haagen family was recorded as Gall/Hall/Hall in household #53.  After seeing the actual handwritten census in Russian I can completely understand why there are translation problems.   It should be noted that the Haag/Haagen family is the same family with name variations within the village.  Dr. Mattias Haagin PhD who spoke at an AHSGR Convention a decade ago was from this family.

    The sixteen LDS microfilms mentioned in the Brabander colony village coordinator's report also include the Dehler 1850 and 1857 census. The 1857 Dehler census is being translated. 

    There is still only one known family chart for Dehler colony prepared by Dr. Igor Pleve, PhD for the Ostertag family.  Dr. Pleve's chart was abruptly short.  This may be explained by an absence of Dehler church records. I have been told that the first Dehler church burned.  For about 30 years afterwards baptisms, marriages, and deaths were recorded three miles away in the Brabander church. After the Dehler church was finally rebuilt, the recording of Sacraments is said to have been returned to Brabander until another church fire that is said to have destroyed the church and the church books about 1917. The LDS microfilm with church records found last week may refute the theory that the Dehler church books were destroyed, because the index for the LDS microfilm clearly records Dehler church records for at least 5 years during the time period from the building of the second church and destruction about 1917. The Ostertag chart visibly shows that Dr. Pleve had no church records to complete the Ostertag Chart.  It can probably be enhanced by obtaining Brabander Church Records for the Ostertag family.

    I have obtained the Masson family church records for the Dehler family from the Brabander church records. I am currently attempting to order more church records from the Samara Archives for both Brabander and Dehler families.  I have also received a 65-page "Stammeliste" (genealogy list) for the Masson family from Dehler and Brabander with photos, addresses, telephone numbers, and e-mail addresses.  Most of the people on the list are in Russia and Germany. There are many other surnames of Brabander and Dehler families on the list which is helping with research of the families that were exiled to Kazakhstan.

    In September 2009 I was able to visit my cousin Andy Kroneberger in Spicer, Minnesota. Andy and I share the Kroneberger, Stoessel, and Kern ancestry.  We worked on merging family files.

     A major item of concern addressed was the problems with publishing his second book which is historically significant for Dehler Colony and our family members.  I read his book A MAN CALLED ANDREAS in the original form and a version that was supposedly edited for him. The work done on the edited version can best be described as disturbingly incompetent.  The edited version was embellished, not proofread or even spell-checked and the photos included appeared as if they had been produced on a worn out copy machine with serious damage to the roller that created unsightly lines down the side of each photo. The print was washed out and the margins were very peculiar. The so called editor actually edited errors into the embellished version. The embellishments were not necessary and not welcome changes. The story is a history and not a fictionalized novel. The work was presented to Andy as a finished book on a take it or leave it basis with a written refusal to make the required corrections. A copyright had been obtained in his name. Since only minor changes are possible without obtaining a new copyright the so called editor refused to make the corrections that should have been made on a galley copy before a copyright had been obtained. What was delivered to Andy was so inferior that he had to refuse it. His well written historically significant book had been destroyed by a so called editor unwilling or perhaps incapable of doing the job that was paid for by contract. Fortunately for Andy, this contract was seriously violated by the so called editor. He spent several months trying to salvage the embellished version of his book, but since the so called editor refused to make the corrections he has had to revert to the original version and prepare to publish it. It only needed a few minor corrections in 2007 and everything done by this so called editor had a negative impact on the book. Hopefully A MAN CALLED ANDREAS, by Andy Kroneberger will be published this spring in the original version. Anyone interested in obtaining a copy of this historical Brabander and Dehler colony book, please contact me. It is hoped that a Spanish and German version will soon follow.  Hopefully an updated version of Andy's book, I FOUND MY FAMILY, a genealogy of the Kroneberger, Stoessel, Max, Bohn, and Meringer families will follow with the new information that we have obtained.

    I am still searching for published records and copies of the videos of the trip of the famous Argentina Stoessel brothers Adan and Andreas Stoessel, grandsons of Michael Stoessel (born 1815 Dehler) and Catharina Hergenröther (born 1818) who migrated to Argentina in the 1870s.  Their grandfather, Michael Stoessel, known in Argentina as Miguel Stoessel was Vorsteher of Colonia San Miguel, an early Volga German Colony of mostly Dehler folks.  Adan and Andreas started out in 1927 driving north in their 1927 Chevrolet from about 200 miles south of Buenos Aires. Their trip took them all the way to Washington DC, New York City, and Detroit. Their route through Central America and Mexico was basically what later became known as the Pan American Highway. In Argentina their trip films are being shown with symphony orchestra music.  If anyone knows where to obtain copies of their journals and video please tell me.  These famous brothers also descend from Rothammel and Seewald families.  Catharina Hergenröther was the daughter of Valentin Hergenröther born 1794 in Seewald Colony. The mother of the Stoessel brothers was Anna Maria Masson born 1863 in Dehler whose mother was Anna Maria Storck with Rothammel roots. Their father was Andreas Stoessel born 1861 Dehler Colony who died in Puan, Argentina in 1939. Their direct ancestry also includes the Büchner family from Dehler which is also in my direct lineage.

    I continue to receive hundreds of e-mails from relatives and allied family members from Dehler each year in Spanish, German, English, and Russian. If you have Dehler Colony ancestry, please contact me.   Please note that since I have ancestry in Rothammel, Seewald, Preuss, Hölzel and Seelmann, I have substantial information from those colonies as well. Since Hölzel, Seelmann, and Preuss are not represented by village coordinators I welcome inquiries for those colonies also.

    Jim Osborne
    Village Coordinator for Dehler

 

  •  

  • Dobrinka, Saratov, Volga

    2009 Village Report for Dobrinka

    The Dobrinka database continues to grow in size.  It is a Master Genealogist database, with 9500 people, 12,400 names and 17,500 events.

    The Dobrinka mailing list is moderately active.  A number of queries were received in the past year from people in the US, Canada, Russia, Germany, and Argentina.  I continue to help people with their family history in any way that I can, and add family information that everyone provides, to the Dobrinka database.  Queries are answered using family group sheets that are uploaded to a folder on the Dobrinka web site at:  http://www.dobrinka.org.

    A copy of the available church birth records for Dobrinka, covering 1852 – 1867 and 1882 – 1894, have been ordered.  Purchase of these records was funded by the Lower Volga Village Project, and by many people researching ancestors from Dobrinka.  Those records are expected sometime in the first quarter of 2010.  A family communion list covering the years 1834 – 1846, was purchased, and has been received.  It is currently being translated.

    Gary Martens

    Village Coordinator for Dobrinka

     

  • Dönhof, Saratov, Volga
     

    2009 Annual Village Report for Donhof

    2009 has seen more activity than usual for Donhof with about a dozen inquires.  With the family data that I have along with the census records for Donhof, I was able to help.  We were able to take one family back several generations using both census and church records and had another inquiry for that family as recently as yesterday.
     
    I am continuing the collection of obituaries for Donhof immigrants as well as general family information.  I also continue to collect
    information of the families that attended the German-Russian church that we moved and are continuing to restore.  However, most of those families were not Donhof immigrants, but were from other villages such as Grimm and Frank.

    Finally, I have recently ordered two family charts from Dr. Pleve for my own family and plan on sharing those when they become available.

    Karen Kaiser
    Co-coordinator for Donhof

     

    2009 Annual Report for Donhof
     
    The year 2009 was relatively quiet as I only had inquiries from 7 different people.  Three of them were international (Australia, Canada, and Germany).  I was able to answer them from the information I have in my database.  The database continues to grow slowly and now has more than 12,800 entries.

    This year's convention was the first that we missed in ten years.  As many of you may know, Judy and I were involved in a terrible car accident in early April.  Due to massive injuries, we are both thankful that we are still alive.

    Dick Leffler
    Village Coordinator for Donhof

     

  • Dreispitz, Saratov, Volga
     

    2009 Annual Report for Dreispitz
     
    This has been another busy year for Dreispitz researchers. Numerous inquiries have been received from a number of states and from Germany and Argentina.  I was able to furnish information or direct them to other sources.   A few of the surnames being
    researched are:  Bohl,  Feil,  Keller, Klein, Heffel/Heffle/Heffele,  Heinz, Heinze, Heinitz,  Herbel, Hetze, Kabolel, Klein,  Kraft,
    Langhofer/Longhofer, Meier,  Miller/Muller, Quindt, Schuber, Schultz/Schulz, Schwein, Sokolowski/Sokolowsky,  Steinle, Vogel, Vollert/Wollert, Wills and Wurtz.
     
    Many arrived in Dobrinka and then went to other colonies.  The Dobrinka census is valuable in connection with Dreispitz and Oberdorf.  I prepared a list of those who immigrated from Dobrinka to Oberdorf.  This has been placed in the VC Dreispitz file and the Dobrinka file. 
     
    I have received several inquiries locating people buried in cemeteries in Kansas and Oklahoma.  I have a number of cemetery listings.  This summer I plan on walking through cemeteries in Marion County, Kansas.
     
    Numerous emails have been exchanged concerning the Heinze's that moved from Oberdorf to Argentina, Oklahoma, and New Mexico.  We are seeking more information from other sources.  We’re missing one and maybe two generations that were born in Oberdorf after 1858 and before 1900.  Correspondence is still ongoing.
     
    E-mails were exchanged with Mabel Heffele of Buenos Aires, Argentina regarding the Heffele families in the United States and the Heinze families in Argentina. Mabel/Mable sent me pictures of headstones in the German cemetery of Ramirez.  Pictures of interest were Alexander Quindt, born 1-12-1800 – deceased 8-8-1876, and Maria Heinze, born 4-1-1801- deceased 5-12-1881. Mabel is a
    librarian and also an officer in the Volga German organization, Wolgadeutsche de Escobar.  Since Mabel speaks and writes
    Spanish, it has been a challenge for both of us to translate our correspondence using Alta Vista.
     
    I prepared a packet of "Heinze Heritage" that I presented to cousins at the Heinze Cousins annual meeting in Lucas in June of 2009.  This covered generations of ancestors from 1717 for six generations, the story of John David Klein and Maria Catherine Heinze, life in Dreispitz, the fate of those who stayed behind, Andrew G. Keller and Katharina Heinze, the German Russian in America, letters from Dobrinka to the United States,  and surviving or fleeing from the Russian Revolution.
     
    I did not attend the 2009 AHSGR International Convention in Medicine Hat, Alberta, Canada.  However, plans are being made to attend the convention in Lincoln, Nebraska in 2010.  I am looking forward to visiting the Village Coordinators, both old and new.
     
    Approximately 2,800 obituaries collected between December 2008 and July 2009 were added to the Lower Volga Obituary Project and furnished to the SOAR Project.  The obituaries are taken from online newspapers in Kansas, Oklahoma, and Nebraska. 
    Others are sent to me by many researchers who have also been collecting obituaries, and from those who want their families on record.  You will find obituaries in the last posting that are for persons born in Russia after 1858, which should be helpful to researchers.   I have now collected another 600 plus that will be submitted to the projects after the first of the year 2010.

    My prayers and deepest sympathy goes out to the family of Ethel Brack Lock, who passed away on September 30, 2009.   Ethel was a life member of AHSGR.  She sent me hundreds of newspaper clippings of obituaries and other articles of deaths, which were entered  on the website for the Lower Volga Obituary Project when I started  this  project in 1998/1999.
     
    Thanks to Gary Marten, Village Coordinator for Dobrinka. I have ordered church records in Russia for Dobrinka.  I look foward to associating with my Dobrinka and Dreispitz ancestors.
     
    I continue my volunteer work in the library for the AHSGR Golden Wheat Chapter, and the Midwest Historical Library.  I am the Registrar for the Golden Wheat Chapter.   I prepare the Golden Wheat Chapter article for the Quarterly Newletter issued by Lincoln.  New members of AHSGR are invited to attend our local Chapter Meetings by sending them a special letter and a copy of our Chapter Newsletter.  They are advised that I am the Village Coordinator for Dreispitz and that I will be happy to help them.
     
    I am continuing research on the Heinze Family, which is my priority.  However, I still collect and store data on the Steinle Family.  I welcome all information.
     
    Rachel E. Smith
    Village Coordinator for Dreispitz
    and Chairman of the Lower Volga Obituary Project

     

  • Eckheim, Samara, Volga
     

    2009 Village Report for Eckheim
     
    Eckheim has been rather quiet.  I've had one request, for the surname Heide.  I don't have that name in my database, and I wonder if it could be Heidt, which I suggested, but Joyce Wheeler, a new member I recruited, is sure of the spelling.  Michael Frank has been working on setting up a website for me, and I have added information for it through the year.  I'm not quite ready to publish the URL just yet, but I'll let this list know as soon as it's up and running.  I've been developing a surname and family file for the village, but I need more Eckheimers to contribute their information, and I hope this may stimulate some to do that.

    Brent Mai has reported to me that he has nearly completed the 1857 Eckheim census.  As soon as he has it finished, I will be adding those names to the surname list.

    Suzanne Heinitz-Dodge
    Village Coordinator for Eckheim & Mueller

 

  • Eigenfeld, North Caucasus

     
  • Eigenheim, Akkerman, Bessarabia

    2009 Village Report for Eigenheim

    North Caucasus

    No requests or information has come forth this past year. Most welcome would be any names I could add to my ancestral residents of Eigenheim (N. Caucasus).  Arthur Flegel, in his e-mail dated 11/07/2008 wrote "As VC for the North Caucasus, not to be confused with the Trans or South Caucasus communities, we are dealing with a region of at least 120 individual villages of varying sizes which are reflections of all the original German settlements throughout Russia. This is an area of a unique history that remains obscure because thus far we have been unable to acquire church or civil records which would help identify and connect the population with that of their Volga, Black Sea, Volhynian, Bessarabian, Chernigov or other origin."  My ancestral Eigenheim was in the vicinity and near another German village, Eigenfeld.  In my grandfather's obituary, it reads: "Friedrick Anhorn was fifth born to Johannes and Magdalena (Esslinger) Anhorn on the 22nd of February 1873 in the village of Eigenheim, Kubangebiet, Caucasus, Russia."

    Co-Village Coordinator for Eigenheim (North Caucasus)

 

  • Enders, Samara, Volga

 

  • Erlenbach, Saratov, Volga

    2009 Village Report for Erlenbach

    In 2009 there were about 15 inquiries sent to my Erlenbach website e-mail address.  Two of those were from Germany, and I was able to help one person but not the other.  One inquiry came from Argentina, which I forwarded to Gary Martens after discovering the correct village to be Dobrinka.  Of the remaining inquiries, I was able to actually help only three people and gave the others suggestions as to where to look further for their ancestor or village.

    One of the German correspondents sent me an article written in Russian.  He said it was about Erlenbach.  How can I get it translated?  Should I send it to Headquarters for them to keep on file?

    Heidi Becker Langenbeck

    Village Coordinator for Erlenbach

     

  • Fischer, Saratov, Volga

 

  • Friedensdorf

     

  • Friedrichsfeld, North Caucasus

 

  • Frank-Kolb Village Database, Saratov, Volga

    2009 Village Database Report for Frank and Kolb

    This has been a busy year for the combined Frank-Kolb database.  The year started with Doris asking Kelly and I to serve as co-coordinators for the villages of Kolb and Frank respectively.  Kelly and I are both grateful for and appreciative of the trust that Doris and Thelma have placed in us. 

    The combined Frank-Kolb database continues to grow.  At this time last year, the database contained records for approximately 210,000 individuals.  As of this writing, the database contains records for more than 214,000. 

    We currently use PAF 4, and Doris does the majority of the data entry, though Kelly and I can also make additions and updates to the database.  Approximately once a month, we synchronize our data.  I generate a GEDCOM file of all of the records that I have changed or added over the previous month.  I send that to Doris along with any photos or documents that I have collected.  Doris sends me back a complete copy of the database, along with a new copy of the photo collection and any other data collections that have
    been updated.  The files are too large to e-mail, and it is a hassle to send CDs back and forth, so we are currently exchanging data using a service called "Drop-Send".  This allows us to securely and immediately transfer large files.  

    I have answered inquiries from 49 individuals or families over the last year, and Kelly reports that she has received 9 inquiries.  Thelma reports that she has had more requests this year than previous years and has been able to help several people with the new information we have obtained from the Kolb church records. 

    Based on the number of e-mails I have archived, it looks like I exchange approximately a dozen e-mails with each requester as I obtain the information needed to determine how they fit into the Frank family tree and answer the questions they have about the materials I send to them.  People are generally looking for help with genealogy research, though I have received a few requests from people seeking advice about visiting the ancestral villages in either Germany or Russia (I have made both trips).  I have also received a few requests from people seeking relatives here in the United States. 

    Most of the requests come from people living in the U.S.  I have also received requests from five people currently living in Germany, one in Russia, and one in Argentina. A lot of the people who contact me have already done extensive research and put together large family trees, complete with photos and documents.  They are very generous about sharing the information they have and are always excited about the amount of data we can share with them about their ancestors.  The inquiries from overseas have given my limited
    German language skills a real workout over the last year.  I owe a huge debt of gratitude to Tanja Schell who has been kind enough to act as translator when a requestor speaks only Russian.  With the information provided by the descendants of the people who were deported in 1941, we are starting to piece together what happened to some of those who were left behind when our ancestors immigrated.  This will be something that I will spend a lot of time on over the next year. 

    I communicate with people almost entirely by e-mail.  I can think of only two instances over the last year where I talked to someone on the phone and then sent out materials via US mail.  It seems that most of the people who contact one have found our e-mail addresses on the AHSGR website, or have found the Frank website maintained by Clarence Kissler and Clarence has referred the requester to one of us. 

    I have received several packets of information about new members from headquarters over the last year.  I also search the list of new members in the AHSGR Newsletter for people who list their ancestral villages as either Frank or Kolb.  I write a letter to each person, letting them know what sort of information we have available in the Frank/Kolb files and invite them to get in touch with me if they need any assistance with their genealogy research.  Interestingly, out of the 29 letters I have sent out, I have received only two inquiries in direct response to the letters.  I will continue to write the letters in spite of the low response rate if only for the simple fact that I think it is good practice to acknowledge new members. Thelma reports that one of the new members was someone who had joined because she had sent him information.   

    Doris and I both attended the Medicine Hat convention.  Those of you who have attended the last couple of conventions know that Village Night has been reorganized into Village Area Groups.  Our group was the Lutheran villages of the Frank Canton, and we had 25 people in our group.  I think the Village Area structure works well because participants frequently have ancestors from several nearby villages.

    Doris is currently in the process of entering all of the available Kolb Church records into the database.  I say "available" because what we have are blocks of records for certain years, not a complete set of all of the church records.  It is certainly better than having nothing at all, but it is still a very large amount of information.  Thelma reports that this has finally enabled her to determine the names of her ancestors back several generations
    to Germany.

    Doris's next big project is entering the available church records for Frank.  This is a more massive project than the Kolb records because Frank had a much larger population.  The major problem here is the substantial cost and time involved in getting the records translated so that they can be quickly and easily input.   

    As Kelly indicated in her Kolb report, a combined Frank-Kolb web site is in the works.  We are looking forward to having that up and running next year.

    Submitted by Maggie Hein, on behalf of the Frank & Kolb VCs - Doris Evans,
    Thelma Sprenger, Kelly Horst and Maggie Hein.

 

  • Frankreich, Samara, Volga

    2009 Village Report for Frankreich

    I took on the duties of the Village Coordinator for Frankreich in January 2009.  At that point I started to collect information on Frankreich.  I received AHSGR information, files, links, databases and materials from Dennis Zitterkopf, Betty Ashley, and Pam Wurst.  I have also received valuable Village Coordinator assistance from Gary Martens, Janet Laubhan Flickinger, and Hugh Lichtenwald.

    The Village of Frankreich had very little activity in 2009.  I have had one query in the past 12 months. I have participated with other Village Coordinators in ordering records from the Volgograd Archives. 

    Frankreich had a 1912 population of 1000, 1103 in 1926.  The Frankreich GED file has 7 Entries listed with the surnames of Wunsch and Messerschmidt. No 1852 census exists.

    My only regret is that with all of the startup activity in establishing a source of information on the villages, I have not been able to develop a website.    

    Ten census records (1850 and 1857) on different villages (which did not include Frankreich) were purchased from Brent Mai.

    I have submitted some obituaries to the obituary project.

    Leland Riffel
    Village Coordinator for Frankreich

  • Galka, Saratov, Volga

    2009 Village Report for Galka

    I took over as the Village Coordinator for Galka in May 2009, and at that point started to build a Galka database.  Besides census information, I received information from Jayne Dye and a database created and maintained by Kathy O’Malley which contained all 1798 census information for all villages in the Lower Volga Village Project.

    The Galka database continues to grow in size.  The Galka database is a Master Genealogist database, with 8600 people, 9000 names and 13,000 events.  Galka surnames include the following:  Arne, Arndt, Arni, Bartelson, Bauer, Baum, Beichel, Bender, Berg, Bergmann, Berhard, Bernhardt, Bickart, Bloch, Block, Brunner, Busch, Dalinger, Dahlinger, Denner, Ebel, Egeus, Elsasser, Elzow, Engel, Erbenson, Fisher, Fischer, Flor, Flohr, Frank, Fried, Fuchs, Gâckel, Gaeckel, Gebel, Geier, Gelwer, Helwer, Gemsemer, Glaser, Göbel, Goebel, Gras, Grass, Grunner, Hahn, Heinz, Heintz, Hellebach, Hirsch, Hirschbeck,
    Hoffmann, Holstein, Just, Kandelin, Keil, Kerbs, Körbs, Klaus, Krebs, Knetzer, Ladner, Lorenz, Malm, Martin, Meer, Mengin, Meng, Muller, Mueller, Nagel, Nickel, Nikkel, Nordberg, Olf, Ott, Popp, Reich, Reis, Reise, Ruf, Ruff, Schanzenbach, Schenc, Schick, Schimpf, Schmidt, Schneider, Schott,
    Sinner, Spring, Steinbecher, Steinbrecher, Steinert, Stürtz, Stuertz, Thaut, Vökler, Voekler, Waltz, Wegert, Wegner, Wenzel, Weisheim, Wiesner, Weismer, Wunsch, Wünsch, Ziegler.

    The Galka mailing list is moderately active.  A number of queries were received in the past year from people in the US, Canada, Russia, Germany, and Argentina.  I continue to help people with their family history in any way that I can, and add family information that everyone provides, to the Galka database.  A Galka web site was created earlier in the year for the prior Galka VC.  Queries are answered using family group sheets that are uploaded to a folder on the Galka web site at:  http://www.galkagr.org.

    A copy of the available church birth records for Galka, covering 1863 – 1884, have been ordered from the Volgograd archives.  Purchase of these records was funded by the Lower Volga Village Project, and by many people researching ancestors from Galka.  Those records are expected sometime in the first quarter of 2010.  While we wait for these records, I am adding about 700 people from birth records I had previously purchased for the Bernhardt surname from Galka.

    Gary Martens

    Village Coordinator for Galka

     
  • Glückstal Colonies Research Association

    GCRA Annual Report for the AHSGR VC Program

    The Glückstal Colonies Research Association currently has ca. 370 members, who receive our two annual Newsletters (totaling 64 pages). An additional 21 German-Russian organizations, genealogical societies, and research libraries receive complimentary copies of our Newsletters. An annual financial report is distributed to the membership. New members receive a list of members, and lists of the surnames each member is researching – one organized by members names and one organized by research surnames. Updated versions of these lists are also available on an annual basis to members who request a copy. New members also receive a list of surnames found in the Revision Lists for the Glückstal Colonies; as well as information about, and addresses for, German-Russian Genealogical and Historical Societies, Resource Organizations, and websites of interest to descendants of the Glückstal Colonies.

    We continue to receive frequent requests for research assistance from new and experienced researchers. Many of them come directly to GCRA headquarters. Others come to the individuals who maintain our master databases, or are posted on our listserv. Those databases (Points of Origin, GEDCOM. and extractions from Ship Passenger Lists) that we originally published in 2004 and updated in our 2008 book, make it possible to answer many of the requests via those sources. Our 2008 book added another database – extractions from the recently available Martyrology records from ca. 1936-1938. In other instances the request is posted on our listserv, if it has not already appeared there. Our publications are also an important source of easily available information.

    One of our recent interesting inquiries was from the Casa Teutsch Haus (the Central Archive of the Evangelical Church A. C. of Romania). They requested supporting information for an individual who was applying for citizenship in Germany, based upon ancestry in Klein Bergdorf (a daughter colony of the Glückstal Colonies). They requested verification that Klein Bergdorf did exist as a village, that the applicant’s father was born there in 1926, and verification that the family did live there.

    We were able to provide them information that certified that the village did exist (citing references in various published monographs); as well as a map showing the location of the village along with its coordinates, excerpts from a Resident List for ca. 1941 compiled after WW II from memory by a former resident (it listed the family, including the father and his birth year); a village map, representing the village ca. 1944 (again drawn from memory) that clearly shows the family farmstead; extractions from the Einwandererzentralstelle (EWZ) records of the family application for German citizenship in 1944 (including the father and his birth place and birth date); and the Point of Origin information for the family (originally from Neckarwestheim/Heilbronn, Württemberg, who immigrated to Bergdorf, South Russia, in 1831).

    We continue to purchase copies of available original documents from archives in South Russia. In the case of Russian documents, one of our members will provide a translation, or we will purchase a translation. German documents are translated by our membership. GCRA subsequently publishes the documents (with commentary) in book form, on disc, or in our Newsletter.

    We are currently involved in a major revision of our website: www.glueckstal.org  which will provide general background information on the mother colonies, daughter colonies and chutors of the Glücksttal Colones; two indices of our Newsletters (by issue and by topic), information on our publications, as well as a collection of maps, and a listing of Glückstal Colonies research sources, and general Germans from Russia research sources. We anticipate that it will be online shortly.

    Submitted on behalf of Margaret Freeman

    Homer Rudolf

     

  • Gnadenfeld, (Neu-Moor/Moor), Samara, Volga

    2009 Village Report for Gnadenfeld

    Gnadenfeld, (Russian name Kirovskoye), small "daughter" colony, is located in the Samara Province, on the weisenseite (meadow side) of the Volga, (Stumpp, District of Krasny-Kut).

    Due to its small population, I do not receive many inquiries. 

    This past year I assisted one person researching a Gnadenfeld family, but have not heard back from him.

    I assisted six families from Moor.

    I am awaiting the completion of the translation of 1857 Samara films, so I can bridge the gap between the families who remained in Moor and those who moved to Gnadenfeld in 1855, when Gnadenfeld was organized.

    I continue to collect surnames from Gnadenfeld and the "mother" colony of Moor, including ship records, declarations of intent, naturalization records, census records and obituaries.

    Irma A. Waggoner
    Village Coordinator for Gnadenfeld

     

     

  • Goebel, Saratov, Volga

    2009 Annual Village Report for Goebel

    I took on the duties of the Village Coordinator for Goebel in September 2009, and I have started a village chart in Family Tree Maker 2010 format. I received AHSGR information, files, links, databases and materials in addition to the 1798, 1816/1834 and 1850/1857 census reports I had already obtained from AHSGR, Rosemary Larson and Brent Mai respectively.

    The Village of Goebel has had little activity to date.  I have not had any direct inquiries, but have been in contact with some other VCs with Goebel-related questions and some common surname contacts I had made prior to becoming Village Coordinator. I did receive a forwarded inquiry just today from Argentina who may have a Goebel connection.  Thanks, Rosemary!  I hope to participate in
    the coming year with fellow VC's in obtaining records from the Volgograd Archives.
     
    I am currently working on researching the German origins of several of the Goebel first settlers and have been ordering microfilms and reviewing them as quickly as I can. I hope to finish entering all the census information into the village chart in the coming year and pursue getting a website established for Goebel village.


    Ben Markel
    Village Coordinator for Goebel


     

  • Graf, Samara, Volga

    2009 Village Report for Graf 

    I received a number of e-mails from Germany and South America for families looking for connections.  Currently I am trying to get the 1878 Graf Family List, one family name at a time.  While I was in Russia I tried to visit the colony, but was taken to Neu-Obermunjou instead.

    Kevin Rupp
    Village Coordinator for Graf

 

  • Grimm, Saratov, Volga

 

  • Güldendorf, Grossliebental, Odessa, Kherson
     

 

  • 2009 Village Report for Herzog

    I don't have much to report as a Village Coordinator for Herzog this year except for the following:

    I've been a poor Village Coordinator in 2009 but plan to be a much better one in 2010.

    I have answered queries I have received, but not really kept good track of the numbers.  I have already started working on a project for 2010 and hope to have it done to be able to share at the convention this summer.  I am cross-referencing and compiling a single document encompassing all Herzog inhabitants from all Russian censuses for which I have access.  It has been very interesting already and I can't wait to see what else I uncover.

    Jerry Braun

    Village Coordinator for Herzog

 

  • Hoffnungstal, Akkerman, Bessarabia
     

     

  • Holstein, Saratov, Volga
     

    2009 Village Report for Holstein

    We are processing the information in the birth, marriage, and death records (1800-1849) for Holstein.

    Ed Hoak and Donna Weiss contributed financially in purchasing the records. Maria Leimann read and computerized the records. David Nelson is presently connecting families using available primary sources (1st settlers list, 1798, 1834, 1850, 1858 census, and the church records).

    David discovered the Holstein birth records were not always recorded under the correct year.  For instance, several 1819 birth records were recorded with the 1813 births and several 1816 records were recorded with the 1819 records. 

    Copies of the original 1834, 1850, and 1858 Holstein census were placed in the AHSGR library. The translated census can be purchased from AHSGR.

    Edith Bottsford
    Village Coordinator for Holstein

     

  • Huck, Saratov, Volga

    2009 Village Report for Huck

    2009 was a "good" year in terms of correspondence with persons interested in the village.  I received 35 inquiries from persons in the US, Germany and Argentina (thank goodness for on-line translation help). The gap in Huck records from 1858 to 1888 still hasn't been resolved but I continue to think, someday, that will no longer be a brick wall for Huck researchers.  Argentina continues to be a very active German-Russian area with numerous (often large) village and family reunion events.

    Another highlight for the year…I (finally) completed the entry of all the available published data for the village into the Huck database using the Pleve Einwanderung volume 2 and our four census records.  This resulted in almost 28800 names.  There are some duplicate entries because I began the database
    using GEDCOM files I received from researchers plus Pleve charts for which I had access.  Now that I've finished the work I certainly would change the process if I were starting anew.  Weeding out the duplicates is a time consuming task.  One thing became evident.  The name Katharina was very common for women and without surnames being provided in most censuses it is impossible to determine a family relationship for a Katharina in a marriage.

    I never received anything from the student at the University of Missouri, Kansas City (UMKC) I mentioned last year so I don't know if he decided on a different research topic or he forgot his offer to send me a copy.

    I contact each person listed in the "New Member" section of the AHSGR Newsletter who indicates an interest in village Huck but am surprised how few respond to my offer to assist them with their research. Some have submitted Family Group Sheet information to Lincoln and I receive copies of those for additions to the database.

    Dennis Zitterkopf
    Huck Village Coordinator

     

  • Husaren, Saratov, Volga
     

     

  • Hussenbach, Linevo Ozero, Saratov, Volga

    2009 Village Report for Hussenbach (Linevo Osero)

    I became the Village Coordinator for Hussenbach (LO) in March 2009, after the passing of Louise Potter.  From AHSGR I received a GEDCOM of people of Hussenbach and I purchased copies of the Hussenbach Newsletter. Frank McLean sent me a CD of Louise’s Database.  I received two boxes of documents from her daughter, Kathy Covert, in August.  Brent Mai also brought me a suitcase full of records from Yakima and I purchased copies of the 1834 and 1857 Hussenbach Censuses from him. Doris Evans sent me nine CD’s of the Hussenbach Birth, Marriage and Death records they purchased from Volgograd.

    I began a new database with the information from AHSGR.  I entered all the Hussenbach people I could find from the Surname charts available on the SOAR database.  Next I entered/matched the Hussenbach people found in Brent Mai’s: 1798 Census of the German Colonies along the Volga.  After that I entered/matched the data found in Brent’s 1834 Census from Hussenbach.  Then I translated the Volgograd 1822-1838 marriage records and entered that data. (Some of these will be updated when I get a more refined translation of some of this information.) Currently I am working on the 1818-1838 Births translation.  I also have someone working on the translation of the Volgograd records that are in Russian, from about 1890 forward.  The database currently has 12,000 people in it.

    Since Hussenbach was not included in the Einwanderung in das Wolgagebiet 1764-1767 book series, I am working with Dick Kraus on a First Settlers Origins List using the Surname Charts and other data.

    I developed a new Hussenbach web page: http://hussenbach.weebly.com/.  I have contacted many places trying to get them to replace Louise’s old web page, since it is no longer viable, with my new page, not all attempts have been successful.

    I have received a number of e-mail inquiries including two in Russian, some from Germany, South America, Canada and quite a few in the USA.  Some I have been able to make a connection and have supplied them with a Family History Report.  I am sure as I get through the 1857 Census and into more of the recent data on the CD’s, I will be able to add more connections.

    Susan Hopp Nakaji

    Village Coordinator for Hussenbach (Linevo Osero)

 

  • 2009 Village Report for Johannestal (Beresan, South Russia)

    During 2009 I continued fielding queries for information and I received about six queries.  I translated a few odd leftovers that were not translated from the 1899-1919 St. Petersburg records that were sent to us from the Nikoaeve archive.
     
    I updated the Johannestal web page (http://members.cox.net/beresan) to include a short section on the Johannestal Lutheran church.  My friend and cousin, Gary Schortzman commissioned an artist to draw what the church looked like before it was destroyed by the Soviets.  I included this picture on the web page with Gary¹s kind permission.

    Ray Heinle

    Village Coordinator for Johannestal

     

  • Josefstal / Schwabe Khutor, Saratov, Volga

    2009 Village Report for Josefstal

    This last year has not seen a major increase in contacts for information relating to Josefstal.  However, it has been a good year for getting our Josefstal data out:

     The Josefstal web site continues to get a large amount of visits.   I try to get historical material out on a
    regular basis. The Josefstal site now also is iPhone and Smartphone compatible.

    I've published the complete Josefstal database on Rootsweb.  It is located at:  
                   http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=gerk1

    The Maus Bremen passenger list site was a goldmine.  Over 200 Josefstal residents traveled to South America in October of 1908 alone.

    My cousin in Germany and I have written and published a book on the history of Josefstal:

    Das Leben an der Wolga: Chronik der Kolonie Josefstal Kanton Erlenbach

    It is a hardcover book in German, 172 pages.  It only took thirty years to compile!  The availability of
    village files in Volgograd has been a huge blessing. Cost of the book is $45.00.  You can e-mail me if you are interested.  Someday we hope to get it translated into English and maybe Spanish.

    Ted Gerk

    Village Coordinator for Josefstal


     

  • Jost, Samara, Volga

    2009 Village Report for Jost
     
    It’s been a quiet year in the Village of Jost.  There have been several requests for
    information.  Most exciting has been the number of inquiries that continue to come from Germany.
     
    With the recent acquisition of Jost Census Records through 1857, the Jost database has grown considerably.  Many descendants are now only one generation from linking their last known ancestor to the village records.  I am also in the process of adding Jost surnames that may have moved to or from adjacent Kanton Kukkus villages.
     
    The Jost website, freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~jost, has been updated with research materials and contributions of family photographs.
     
    I look forward to the 2010 convention in Lincoln, Nebraska, where I hope to meet more Jost descendants.
     
    Beth Mueller-Rohn Davenport

    Village Coordinator for Jost

     

  • 2009 Village Report for Kamenka

    Some of the names about whom I received queries are: Weiman, Roth, Meier, Vogel, Froshauer, Schwindt, Hohl, Kuhn, Hoffman, and Wiesner.  An unusual e-mail request came from New Zealand requesting information for a friend living in Brazil.

    E-mails have been exchanged with a cousin in Russia concerning my maternal grandfather who lived in Katherinestadt and the village of Zug, Russia.  Since he made a Russian genealogical website this year, he has been busy with keeping up with requests.  He has posted information about the various Volga villages.  Contact me if you would like to see his website.

    The LDS microfilms of baptisms, marriages and deaths of the Catholic Volga Wiesenseite that came to light recently may help to fill the gap that exists between the 1857/1858 village censuses and the time when many of our ancestors left the Volga villages at the turn of the century.

    The 1834 and 1850 Kamenka censuses are available.  The 1857 Kamenka census is nowhere to be found in Russia.

    Rosemary Larson

    Village Coordinator for Kamenka

     

     

  • Kassel, Glückstal, Odessa, Kherson

 

  • Kautz, Saratov, Volga

    2009 Village Report for Kautz

    This year was a somewhat quiet one for Kautz.  I was in contact with over 30 individuals regarding Kautz genealogy.  Charts and reports were provided for most from the Kautz database which now contains 23,870 individuals.  Thirteen CD's of 'Unsere Leute von Kautz' (Our People from Kautz), release 5.0, have been provided to those with an interest in Kautz genealogy during the year.

    The fund to acquire Kautz Parish (Church) records is growing.  Approximately 3,900 pages of these records (births, deaths, marriages) for Kautz are known to exist in the Volgograd archives.  Current price is $2.00 per page, as I understand it.  These pages are written in German.  Hopefully, I'll be able to acquire a part, if not all, in 2010.  I'm not sure if these records will provide a clue as to village origination in Germany for the Kautz founding families, but I am willing to delay further reading of LDS microfilm for
    German towns with my known surnames, until I know for sure.  Microfilm reading has not been too productive thus far.  At the least, these records should fill in the wide gaps of knowledge of the founders of Kautz and their descendants through to the 1920's, especially after the 1857 census.

    Again I wish to thank those who contribute obituaries to the Listserv and to me personally.  Henry Schmick, in particular, has regularly provided information on 2009 deaths which consistently hit against my Kautz database.

    I attended an open-house at Concordia University in September for the new Center for Volga German Studies.  The facility is quite a statement to the dedication and resolve in furthering Volga German genealogy.  My thanks go to all who played an important part, especially Brent Mai.

    Michael Frank
    Village Coordinator for Kautz

     
  • Klosterdorf, Swedish Colonies, Nikolaev and Kherson

     
  • Köhler, Saratov, Volga\

 

  • Kolb, Saratov, Volga


     
  • Konstantinovka, Samara, Volga

 

  • Kraft, Saratov, Volga

    2009 Village Report for Kraft 
     
    This has been a slow year for Kraft village research.

    I received six inquiries and was able to help with one.  I was not able to add any new information to our database.

    Ron Burkett
    Village Coordinator for Kraft

 

  • Krasnojar, Samara, Volga

    2009 Village Report for Reinwald and Krasnoyar 
     
    Activity for these two villages was very limited in the beginning of the year.  The only significant activity in the beginning of the year was a meeting in Chicago with five other Village Coordinators.  It was a productive meeting.  We all learned what each other has done in the past and all learned ways we could work together. I think it is extremely important that all the Village Coordinators can work together. In the first nine months I received a few queries and have been working with those people.  I made an extra effort to contact any new members that had been listed in the AHSGR publications.  All of the documentation I had collected over the years has now been scanned to files and copies of those files are stored in a safe deposit box. 

    Since retiring, I have more time to devote to research.  In late October, I started receiving e-mails from Russia and Germany from people who are descendants of Reinwald and Krasnoyar.  I was able to help several of them and, in turn, they provided a wealth of information.  I am now organizing what I have received and am trying to pass this information to families of the same name that are members.  I know of several members who will be delighted to find out that they have living relatives in Germany and Russia. The people who have contacted me have apparently given my name out and since then I have received at least one e-mail a day.  Some of the e-mails I have received do not really pertain to either Reinwald or Krasnoyar so I have forwarded those emails to the appropriate Village Coordinators.

    Susie Weber Hess
    Village Coordinator for Reinwald and Krasnoyar

     
  • Kratzke, Saratov, Volga

    2009 Village Report for Kratzke

    This year has been perhaps a bit less active than past years.  Many requests are received from researchers currently living in Germany, some from those remaining in Russia.   Copies of parish records have been obtained for Kratzke, Dietel, and Merkel and are currently being translated under the leadership of Dr. Dona Reeves-Marquardt. 

    I had a wonderful opportunity to speak at the Bundestreffen of the Landsmannschaft der Deutschen aus Russland near Dusseldorf, Germany, in June.  My family and I also had a wonderful dinner with researcher Sergej Kindsvater in Munich.

     We lost a couple of key Kratzke researchers this year.  Co-Village Coordinator for many
    years, and a mentor since I was in high school, Ethel Brack Lock, 89, died on September 30th in Kansas.  The Rev. Louis Fabrizius, a speaker at numerous international and regional AHSGR events, died August 18th in Bakersfield, California, at the age of 94.  Those of us from the close-knit and very inter-related Kratzke family miss them greatly.

    Brent Mai
    Kratzke Colony Research Coordinator

    AHSGR Life Member since 1983


     

  • Kronental, North Caucasus

 

  • Kukkus, Samara, Volga

     

     

  • Kulm, Bessarabia

 

  • Lauwe, Saratov, Volga

    2009 Village Report for Lauwe
     
    During 2009 I continued fielding queries for information and I received about four queries.  Since Brent Mai published the LDS film numbers for the 1850 and 1857 censuses, I ordered those films from the LDS and digitized the censuses for those years.  Those data I passed on to Brent.  I also translated the 1850 census and passed those results to Brent, who checked my translations for accuracy. These two censuses have been published.
     
    I updated the Lauwe web page (http://members.cox.net/lauwe) to include a head-of-household index of the 1850 census.  I also included links to the Center for Volga German Studies, thus hoping to encourage the purchasing of Brent¹s census publications.
     
    An additional finding was that I checked the 1834, 1850, and 1859 against a Pleve chart of my Goeringer family.   Pleve¹s accuracy was excellent and I found only a few instances where individuals might have been missed.

    Ray Heinle

    Village Coordinator for Lauwe on the Volga

     
  • Leichtling, Saratov, Volga

    2009 Village Report for Leichtling 
     
    This was a very quiet year for Leichtling. We have had a few inquiries this year.  I
    believe the posting of all the information I have collected on Leichtling (including the 1834 and 1850 census records) to the website has allowed many to answer their own questions.  There seems to be less interaction with me and it is more convenient for them. I'm still trying to decide if that is good or bad.

    The website gets a good amount of hits (views), so I know people are actively working in the village. I continued to work with a couple of people and have added names to the village database which is also online.

    Darryl Boyd
    Village Coordinator for Leichtling
     

  • Leipzig, Bessarabia

 

  • Lillienfeld, North Caucasus

.

  • Louis, Samara, Volga

    2009 Village Report for Louis
     
    This was not a very busy year for the village of Louis.  I received two inquiries, but I was unable to find either surname.  I sent some of them onward to Kevin Rupp, as my reference library is limited to census from the First Settlers Lists through the 1850's.  As in the some of the Mariental requests, they are looking for information from the later 1800's.  I feel that I need to update my reference material whenever possible in order to be able to answer some of these later queries.  This also depends on my financial resources.

    I had received a CD containing Kansas Catholic Volga Germans Obituaries from Frank Jacobs and Gary Ubert.  I am working on inserting them into my PAF data base .  This will be an ongoing project, as they are updating their list with each of their Chapter Newsletters.

    Thelma Mills
    VC Coordinator for Louis

     

  • Luzern,  Samara, Volga

 

  • Mariental, Samara, Volga

    2009 Village Report for Mariental

    There have been about 35 requests for information of the Mariental Village this year.  Some of them were received during my summer in Kansas, and I had to get back to them after I arrived home where all of my reference material is stored.  I can only take three large volumes along with me, as I am limited for what we can haul in the car for our summer trip.  I feel several of them were very understanding of my unusual predicament.  Plus there were Kansas storms which knocked me off the Internet for about two weeks each time.  I have found it to be an interesting year in spite of these snags.

    I had received a CD containing Kansas Catholic Volga Germans Obituaries from Frank Jacobs and Gary Ubert.  I am working on inserting them into my PAF data base.  This will be an ongoing project, as they are updating their list with each of their Chapter Newsletters.  What a great Newsletter it is.  Speaking of newsletters, (my favorite task as VC), I have been gathering photos and stories from our people to publish in the newsletter, and this has been another very interesting portion of my Newsletter on Mariental, Louis, and Chasselois.  It is great to be able to put a face to many of these names and to learn about their lives and searches for their ancestors.

    I was unable to attend the convention in this summer.  I feel so left out of things when I am unable to attend.  Hopefully I will be able to attend this next summer in Lincoln.  Hopefully, my daughter/VC assistant will be able to go also.  These are the most informative and fun conventions we have attended.  Everyone should attend. Volga German people are FUN!

    Thelma Mills
    VC Coordinator for Mariental

 

  • Markosowka, North Caucasus

 

  • Messer, Saratov, Volga

    2009 Annual Village Report for Messer

    There is no VC report for the village of Messer as Bob Weigand died suddenly this fall. He was also the President of Greater Seattle Chapter of AHSGR.
     
    I do want to advise that we have talked to Bob's family and when someone steps forward to take over as Messer's Village Coordinator, we will be able to download his database and get his Messer records.
     
    Please let me know when we have a replacement.
     
    Jean A. Roth. Village Coordinator for Messer
    Vice President - Greater Seattle Chapter of AHSGR

 

  • Molochna Colony Mennonite Villages

 

  • Moor, Saratov, Volga

    2009 Village Report for Moor

    2009 was an active year for the Moor group.   We received a number of email requests from Russia, Germany, South America, Canada, and the U.S.  We were able to help many of these researchers to trace their ancestors, sometimes back to the roots in Germany or to others researching the same surnames.

    The addendum to the 1857 census of which Brent Mai kindly informed us was available was added to our collection of Moor related documents. The text lists those colonists
    who were sent to daughter colonies. The census needs to be translated.

    The German origins of a few more Moor settlers were added to the known list. This included the families of Georg Eberhard and Nicolaus Eckel. We are looking for help finding more ancestors in Germany.

    On the down side, my heavy work load all year has prevented publishing any
    new issues of the Balzer/Moor newsletter.  I am looking for a new general editor.

    Wayne H. Bonner

    Village Coordinator for Moor


     

     

  • Mueller, Saratov, Volga

    2009 Village Report for Mueller
     
    I was asked by Dennis this year if I would take over the Mueller VC post, but I have nothing new to report for Mueller.  It seems as though so much research has already been done for this village, I'm not sure what more I can do right now.  I am waiting to learn if a census is available for later than 1857.  Most people seem to need the later years, so they can connect all the dots in their family trees. There is a multitude of information
    available on the web for Mueller.  Among some of the sites are:

         http://www.webbitt.com/volga/lower/muellerpics.htm

         This is the documentation by Brian Ebel of a trip he made to Mueller in 2000.  He has
         posted several photos as well as the story of his trip.

         http://www.webbitt.com/volga/lower/mueller.html

         The information from the
         Lower Volga Project, and includes a family list of first settlers.

    Doing a Google search will help a person find even more.  I plan to set up a Mueller website sometime next year, and will have links on it to other Mueller sites.

    Suzanne Heinitz-Dodge
    Village Coordinator for Mueller & Eckheim


     

  • Mühlhausendorf, Swedish Colonies, Nikolaev and Kherson
     

     

  •  

     

  • Neu-Galka, Samara, Volga

    2009 Village Report for Neu-Galka
    Neu-Galka, Samara, Volga

    I took on the duties as the Village Coordinator for Neu-Galka in January 2009, and at that point started to collect information on the village.  I received AHSGR information, files, links, databases and materials from Dennis Zitterkopf, Betty Ashley, and Pam Wurst. I have also received valuable VC assistance from Gary Martens, Janet Laubhan Flickinger, and Hugh Lichtenwald.

    The Village of Neu-Galka had very little activity in 2009.  I have had twelve inquiries in the past 12 months. I have participated with other VC's in ordering records from the Volgograd Archives.  Ordering these records will have a double purpose for me personally. Besides establishing records for the villages, they will also hopefully answer relationship questions on my ancestral family surnames of Riffel, Hanschu, Langhofer, Lorei and Weimer with connections to Galka and/or Neu Galka (or any other Volga village where they resided) after 1857.  We were able to connect with three descendants of Frederick Riffel in trying to sort out the makeup of Riffel line from Russia to Argentina. We were able to connect with the descendants of Johann Heinrich and Georg Heinrich Riffel in trying to sort out the makeup of the Riffel relationships in Marion and Dickinson County Kansas from Volga Russia.

    Origination of Neu-Galka

    The largest movement of families took place in 1860 when 610 people from Galka and 20 people from Dobrinka founded the village of Neu-Galka.  Neu-Galka started out with about 650 people in 1857, and had a population of 2377 in 1912.  Subsequent to 1857, there were approx 25-50 births per year which were all listed on four to five pages.  Neu-Galka GED file has two entries with the surnames of Siebenlist and Schimpf. An 1860 census of Neu-Galka is currently being translated, currently estimated to be available sometime in 2010 or later. The church birth records are available for Neu-Galka covering the years 1902-1907.

    My only regret is with all of the startup activity in establishing a source of information on the villages, I have not been able to develop a website.     

    Information Riffel Surname Background

    The main origination of the Riffel line is the Karlsruhe area in Germany. In the movement of Riffel families, some went eastward to the Volga Russia area and later to North America, some directly to North America, some to South America (Argentina and Brazil) and some from North America to South America (Argentina and Brazil).

    A Riffel family descendant in Mexico researching the Riffel surname has identified the oldest Riffel in the family known as Johann Bernhard Riffel, born 1636. The Riffel family surnames in the town of Karlsdorf, Germany have published in 2003 a family historical book that I am trying to obtain.

    A Riffel family descendant in South Africa researching the Riffel surname inquired about which branch of the Riffel's he belonged to and the family genealogical relationship that exists.

    Ten census records (1850 and 1857) on different villages were purchased from Brent Mai.

    I have submitted some obituaries to the obituary project.

    Leland Riffel
    Village Coordinator for Neu-Galka

 

  • Neudorf, Glückstal, Odessa, South Russia

 

  • Neu-Moor, Saratov, Volga

    2009 Village Report for Neu-Moor

    Neu-Moor (Russian name Pogranichnyy), was a "grand-daughter" colony, formed in the 1920's by people living in the "mother" colony of Moor.  It was located in the Balzer District on the Bergseite (west or hilly side) of the Volga River, and was approximately 30 - 40 miles from the "mother" colony of Moor.

    Very little information is available on Neu-Moor.  So far there has been only one person seeking information on this colony.

    Irma A. Waggoner
    Village Coordinator for Gnadenfeld

     

  • Neu-OberMonjou, Samara, Volga, Russia

    2009 Village Report for Neu-Obermunjou

    I have not had any inquires this year for the colony of Neu-Obermunjou, which is a daughter colony of Obermunjou.

    I was able to visit the colony unexpectedly when I went to Russia with the AHSGR delegation this September.  I then asked to be taken to Graf since it was close to Rohleder and Herzog, but it seemed that it was taking a long time to get there.  When we arrived we walked around the village and we saw a group of people walking down the street.  A man was playing an accordion and all were singing and dancing.  My interpreter told me that this was a third day of a three-day wedding.  The groom was dressed as the bride and the bride was dressed as the groom, lipstick and all.  A lady came up to me and offered me a shot glass and a piece of bread.  My interpreter told me that this was part of the local wedding tradition.

    We then found an older couple and spent some time inside their home.  She had been a teacher for many years.  After we talked for a while she proceeded to take us to an older building that was used as a “Club”, an area where the whole colony socialized.  In this building they kept a historical record of the colony, which looked as if the book started in about the 1950’s.  They read me a newspaper clipping from the book which told about the area.  Graf was nowhere listed in the article, not even by its Russian name.  I was a little disappointed when we left that it was not Graf.  While we were leaving I was thinking about the names that were listed and remember the name of Neu-Obermunjou in Russia.  It was a very nice surprise, visiting the colony where my Wolf family lived before they left for the United 
    States.

    Our next scheduled stop was Louis.  When we got there I must have asked my interpreter if this really was Louis, and she said yes.  I was surprised to see how large the colony/town really was, thinking 
    that this was where my grandmother left in 1909 as she immigrated to the United States.

    Kevin Rupp
    Village Coordinator for Neu-Obermunjou

     

 

  • Neu-Schilling I and II, Samara, Volga

 

  • Neu-Straub, Saratov, Volga

    2009 Village Report for Neu-Straub

    I had several inquiries from Germany.  One requested a copy of the book I compiled on the Keil name.  I sent it to him but have not heard if it was any help.

    I would like to hear from others who had family in Neu-Straub.  To date, I have only two names but no information about their family.

    I still have a Confirmation Certificate on Hilda Elisabetha Nuss, dated 11th April 1909 from a church in Fillmore County, Nebraska.  The Pastor was Michael Hofer.  This is printed in German and a beautiful "Konfirmations-Schein".  I purchased it some time ago just because it was in German and so beautiful.  If this lady is part of your family, I would be happy to send it to you.

    Lillian Larwig
    Village Coordinator for Neu-Straub

 

  • Neu-Weimar, Samara, Volga

    2009 Village Report for Neu-Weimar

    I took on the duties of the Village Coordinator for Neu-Weimar in January 2009, and at that point started to collect information on the village. I received AHSGR information, files, links, databases and materials from Dennis Zitterkopf, Betty Ashley, and Pam Wurst. I have also received valuable VC assistance from Gary Martens, Janet Laubhan Flickinger, and Hugh Lichtenwald.

     The village of Neu-Weimar has very little activity.  I have had seven inquiries in the past twelve months. I have participated with other VC’s in ordering records from the Volgograd Archives.

    In 1912, Neu-Weimar had a population of 2298 and in 1926 a population of 2044. Weimar [for Neu-Weimar] GED file has 129 Entries listed with the surnames of Bauer, Bischoff, Fass, Flath, Fox, Garlack, Gerlock, Graf, Gross, Heffel, Heinze, Kerbs, Krenz, Maier, Meyer, Miller, Moore or Mohr, Neiwert, Neiwirth, Neuwerth, Rusch, Scheidt, Schmidt, Schneider, Spindler, Utz, Weichhold, and Weimer.  No 1852 census exists.

    My only regret is that with all of the startup activity in establishing a source of information on the villages, I have not been able to develop a website.    

    Ten census records (1850 and 1857) on different villages were purchased from Brent Mai.  These did not include Neu-Weimar.

    I have submitted some obituaries to the obituary project.

    Leland Riffel
    Village Coordinator for Neu-Weimar


     

  • Neu-Yagodnaya, Samara, Volga
     

     

  • Nieder-Monjou, Samara, Volga

    2009 Village Report for Nieder-Monjou

    During the past year we received nine queries concerning the following Nieder-Monjou surnames: ANSCHUETZ, BISTERFELDT, EURICH, HERBER, HILGENBERG, MUELLER, RIEB, RIEFFER, ROSENGREN and SCHAEFER.

    We added quite a few items to the Nieder-Monjou web site.   These include many photographs taken in Russia of individuals from Nieder-Monjou.  A few of the photographs were taken in Siberia and Kazakhstan after the exile of the Volga Germans.  We added a "Scheine" page with some examples of birth certificates and confirmation certificates.  Also added was a German translation of the 1857 Nieder-Monjou revision list.

    Michael Grau and Steven Grau

    Village Coordinators for Nieder-Monjou

 

  • North Caucasus
     

     
  •  

  • Ober-Monjou, Samara, Volga

    2009 Village Report for Obermunjou 

    The year 2009 was a good year for receiving information and photos, especially.  I have made contact with a number of researches from Germany who all had requested information from me this year and in return, have been able to share family information back and forth.  I probably received about ten e-mails or so, for people wanting information about Obermunjou. Some of these people have sent me their genealogies.  From these, I am able to make some connections of some of the people who stayed in Russia.  I have baptism records from various years that are not complete from 1821 – 1918, marriages 1839-1911, and deaths 1850-1918.

    On my trip with the delegation from AHSGR to Russia and the archives I was able to look at one book of the Tirspol records and it just happens to be the deaths from Obermunjou in 1896.  Unfortunately, it does not look very feasible to get whole records from the archives, just bits and pieces.

    I received a number a letters that were sent from family members in Obermunjou, Russia to family members in Ellis County, Kansas from Frank Jacobs.  I really appreciate these letters.

    While I was in Russia I was not able to visit the colony of Obermunjou, but accidentally stumbled into the colony of Neu-Obermunjou, which is a daughter colony of Obermunjou.

    I have also received a number of e-mails from South American and have been exchanging information.

    Kevin Rupp
    Village Coordinator for Obermunjou


     

  • Odessa, Odessa, South Russia

    2009 Village Report for Odessa

    Enquiries this year have been few and far between. I continue to work on the master list that I started last year.

    Ella M. Melik

    Village Coordinators for Odessa
     

     
  • Old Swedish Villages

    2009 Annual Village Report for Old Swedish Villages

    Alt-Schwedendorf, Mühlhausendorf, Schlangendorf and Klosterdorf

    I received numerous inquiries, mainly from people in Canada and one from Germany, on family names of Buch, Meier/Maier, Rexin, Oppenlaender, Bisslinger, Ehmann, Fahlmann, Frei, Tauberger, Geissler, Glubrecht, Stuhlberg, Netzel and Kowalsky.  With the help of fellow researchers of these villages I have helped them to further their research.

    I have referred these researchers to the on-line microfilms that are now available on the LDS website FamilySearch.org where they have had quite a lot of success finding their relatives in the Lutheran Parish Records.
     
    Karen Wright
    Village Coordinator for the Old Swedish Villages

    Alt-Schwedendorf, Mühlhausendorf, Schlangendorf and Klosterdorf

     

  • Orlovskoye, Samara, Volga

 

  • 2009 Village Report for Paulskoye 
     
    It has been a good year in terms of inquiries and data collection. While we await Brent Mai's translation of the Paulskoye 1850 census (LDS  #2362213) and Paulskoye 1857 census, I can now, since my last report was filed, report the 1857 census revision is located on LDS microfilm #2373695.
     
    I received a query from Siberian-born Katharina Gomer of Germany concerning the BARTH surname. Through our exchange and subsequent research I have learned that a daughter colony named Lilienfeld was in part settled by villagers from Paulskoye. Her ancestors also hailed from Orlovskoye.
     
    Jim Parsonage, Village Coordinator for Schaffhausen, and I studied the BALLART and SPAHNAGEL families as part of a large contingent of temporary settlers who wintered in Paulskoye in 1767/68.  Some of these wintering colonists later founded Schaffhausen.  Pleve has noted in his writings that some villages reportedly founded in 1767 were in truth settled in 1768 due to the lack of initial housing for colonists. I believe it is possible  to reconstruct a partial First Settlers List for villages lacking a FSL by  using the FSLs of Paulskoye, Beauregard, Boaro, Katharinenstadt, Philippfeld, Kaneau, and Nieder Monjou, among others (as they had "wintering" colonists), as well as the 1798 Volga German census collection, including its Movement Tables.
     
    George Valko of Chicago, Illinois sought information about several Paulskoye SCHWABAUER families here in the US and how they were related to the Krasnojar SCHWABAUER families; the short answer is that the Paulskoye SCHWABAUERs are a branch of the Krasnojar SCHWABAUERs.
     
    A query from Siberian born Eugen Reinhardt of Germany led to a search for LENK and ALBACH relatives. As a result I have learned a great deal about the LENKs of Bellwood, Illinois and the ALBACHs of Kilwinning, Saskatchewan, Canada based on archival documents and personal contact with descendants.  Mr. Reinhardt has provided me with family information, photos and documents on his ancestors who remained in Russia.
     
    Thanks to Kind Village Coordinator  Bill Pickelhaupt, I now have a parish record extraction from St. Paul's Lutheran Church in Port Huron, MI for Paulskoye family REIGE/REICHE.  Bill Pickelhaupt's soon to be released book The Right Place at the Right Time: The Volga-Germans of Michigan's Thumb will contain the complete parish register for St. Paul's and most certainly contain more Paulskoyer families. Bill also sent me parish records for St. John's Lutheran Church in Port Sanilac, Michigan. These records contain Volga-German families beginning in 1906 and draw from a number of Wiesenseite villages.

    Surnames include:
    BACHMANN, DIETZEL, DORN, DUBS, EURICH, FINK,  HORST, JUNKER, JURKE, KNOLL, HARTMANN, LEHR, LOEFFLER, MARKGRAF, MUELLER,  OEHLERT, REIGE, REIS, REUSCH, RICHTER, SCHERER, SCHNEIDER, SCHWABAUER, WAGNER,  WEDE, and WOLF. These families were drawn to this part of Michigan due to the expanding sugar beet industry.
     
    I also received a query from Ward Richter concerning his father's cousin Maria Elisabeth RICHTER from Schulz colony who married a Heinrich SCHWABAUER from Paulskoye. They lived most of their lives in Croswell, and later Port Huron, Michigan.
     
    Hugh Lichtenwald has translated several Die Welt Post famine articles (archived on GER-VOLGA List) pertaining to Paulskoye.  Surnames: LEMKE, MERKEL, and SCHNEIDER.
     
    This year I became aware of a partial list of Volga colonists who died over the age of 80 years at (http://www.wolgadeutsche,net/pleve.htm).  There I found three Paulskoyer and their age at death for years of 1889 and 1908.  Surnames: KALBFLEISCH, MERKEL (nee KNOLL), and WERNER (nee LOBES).
     
    For anyone who has not visited (http://lists.memo.ru/), you probably should.  I periodically revisit this website as it is updated with new information.  Contained there is an alphabetical list of victims of Soviet repression, including Volga Germans, and a brief biography for each. While it is in the Russian language, a person with only a minimal
    understanding of what your village or surnames of interest look like in Cyrillic can find many entries of interest which can then be translated. For example I found over two dozen persons with my paternal surname of WEDE from Paulskoye. Thus, it is a potential gold mine of information about persons who remained in Russia.  I plan to extract all Paulskoye individuals for the coming year.
     
    Along the same vein, from the GER-VOLGA List I learned this year of a website at (http://www.rusdeutsch.ru/?tagil=5) about prisoners of the Ural region Tagillag Trudarmee (Labor Army Camp). I located ten prisoners from Paulskoye by the surname of DAMM, DORN, FELSING, KOLMAI, KRAUSE, MACHLEIT, MERKEL, NICKELMAN, RERICH, and WALTER.  Many thanks to Mr. Eugen Reinhardt of Germany who translated the information from Russian into English for me!
     
    Finally, the Paulskoye website has been down for nearly a year now.  Unfortunately AOL decided suddenly, and without warning, to get out of the business of providing website services for their members. I am still undecided as whether to construct another one elsewhere.
     
    Respectfully submitted,
    Tim Weeder
    AHSGR Village Coordinator for Paulskoye

     

  • Pfeifer, Saratov, Volga

    2009 Village Report for Pfeifer

    It has been quite a busy year answering queries about the village of Pfeifer.  Some of the names concerned are Heim, Schoenfeld, Burgardt, and Falkenstein.  I also have been answering questions for members on the Volga List

    I have been creating a list of the Catholic immigrants to Russia from Kuhlberg's listing on the ship "Anna Catherina" shown in Pleve's book "The German Colonies on the Volga: The Second Half of the Eighteenth Century".  This is fascinating.  I am checking the names against the First Settler Lists and the Transport Lists.  Some of the Germanic origins in the Kuhlberg lists are different from the First Settler Lists.

    I attended the Kansas Roundup of Chapters in Topeka, Kansas in October.  Martha Issinghoff gave a great presentation about a Stremel relative in Germany.  There were videos shown of the early Volga German settlement in Topeka and the unique architecture of St. Joseph's Catholic Church in the area.  Many of the settlers were from Pfeifer and Kamenka, Russia.

    The 1850 Pfeifer census is available, listing the spouses as well as the head of families.  Kevin Rupp has the 1834 and 1857 censuses available for Pfeifer.

    Rosemary Larson
    Village Coordinator for Pfeifer

 

  • Pobochnoye, Saratov, Volga

    2009 Village Report for Pobochnoye (Nebendorf)
     
    There have been about fifty requests for information on family members, immigration records, census records, etc. 
     
    Kenny Stugart attended the Medicine Hat Convention and represented Pobochnoye there.  He joined forces with others from Yagodnaya Polyana.
     
    Kenny Stugart, Alexander Wilhelm and Laurin Wilhelm have been obtaining, studying and translating official communist records on the men of the village who played a part in the rebellion in the spring of 1921.  Many were our relatives.  Some men were shot; some were imprisoned; others were deported
    to Siberia.  More research still needs to be done here.
     
    Laurin and Gracie Wilhelm attended the "Kansas Round Up of Germans from Russia" held in Topeka, KS October 23rd & 24th this year.   About 80 of our people were present.  Most were from Hays, Wichita, or Topeka.  We are all looking older this year.  Programs given by Martha Issinghoff, Ike Appelhanz
    and others stressed our Volga German people coming to Kansas between 1874 to 1918 in search of personal freedom, religious freedom, land, jobs and education.  A memorial service was held honoring those members who had died in the past year, and a salute honoring those who had served in the military was held.
     
    Laurin Wilhelm
    Village Coordinator for Pobochnoye (Nebendorf)

     

  • Polish Volhynia
     

     

  • Reinhard(t), Samara, Volga

 

  • Reinwald, Samara, Volga

    2009 Village Report for Reinwald and Krasnoyar 
     
    Activity for these two villages was very limited in the beginning of the year.  The only significant activity in the beginning of the year was a meeting in Chicago with five other Village Coordinators.  It was a productive meeting.  We all learned what each other has done in the past and all learned ways we could work together. I think it is extremely important that all the Village Coordinators can work together. In the first nine months I received a few queries and have been working with those people.  I made an extra effort to contact any new members that had been listed in the AHSGR publications.  All of the documentation I had collected over the years has now been scanned to files and copies of those files are stored in a safe deposit box. 

    Since retiring, I have more time to devote to research.  In late October, I started receiving e-mails from Russia and Germany from people who are descendants of Reinwald and Krasnoyar.  I was able to help several of them and, in turn, they provided a wealth of information.  I am now organizing what I have received and am trying to pass this information to families of the same name that are members.  I know of several members who will be delighted to find out that they have living relatives in Germany and Russia. The people who have contacted me have apparently given my name out and since then I have received at least one e-mail a day.  Some of the e-mails I have received do not really pertain to either Reinwald or Krasnoyar so I have forwarded those emails to the appropriate Village Coordinators.

    Susie Weber Hess
    Village Coordinator for Reinwald and Krasnoyar

     

  • Rohleder, Samara, Volga

    2009 Village Report for Rohleder 
     
    I didn’t receive too many inquiries for the colony of Rohleder this year, although I am helping one person with his family line. This included getting baptism and marriage records from the archives.

    The highlight of the year was the trip that I made with the AHSGR delegation to the archives and to a few of the colonies.  I was able to visit the colony of Rohleder.  Since there was a German from Russia gathering a number of miles away, many of the locals were not available to answer many of my questions.  The church is still standing although it is now used as a “Club”, an area for people of the colony to gather for dances and social gatherings.  I was told that they have a museum in the building with a book if it’s history.  Unfortunately, the person who was in charge of the “Club” was at the German from Russia gathering.

    In the center or platz of the colony is a walkway leading to a bust of Lenin.  The colony does have a school and also a General store where canned goods, fresh meat, and liquor are sold.  My interpreter was able to talk to a local who was Polish, having moved here to the colony about ten years ago and is handicapped.  He said that he thought there was a Weber family that still lived in the colony, but most of the Germans from Russia all left in the 1990’s and went to Germany after the Berlin wall came down.

    Toward the south (I think) of the village is the cemetery.  There were many graves but most were from the recent twenty years, and all Russian.  One thing of which I was totally surprised was how littered the outside of the colony was kept and that small little trash piles that were either burned, burning or had just been dumped.  I was able to get some good pictures of the church and various buildings.

    After we left Rohleder we look a dirt road towards Herzog.

    Kevin Rupp
    Village Coordinator for Rohleder

     

  • Rohrbach, Berezan, Odessa, Kherson

    2009 Annual Village Reports for Worms and Rohrbach

    I have concentrated on sharing information about Worms and Rohrbach through my website.  During 2009, I have had 8096 hits on this website.  The Rohrbach site has received 5679 hits during the year, and the Worms site has received 5653 hits. I want to thank Michael Frank for helping me to set up this website. The information contained there is both historical and genealogical.  My expertise lies in historical information, but the information posted on the site has led to a number of contacts by individuals seeking both additional historical and genealogical data about their family background.  I have also added an article about the fate of German Russians who were purged by the Stalin regime.  Some of the information included was provided by individuals who contacted my website.

    I have been collecting surnames for both Worms and Rohrbach.  This has put me in contact with family members of Reichert, Ehly, Klundt, Bier, Trautmann, Werner, Zimblemann, Gall, Griess, Odenbach, Moser, and other lines whose roots are in Worms and Rohrbach. I have also posted pictures of some of these early residents, which were provided by family members.

    It is exciting to meet individuals who are related to me that I did not know existed.  A number of these individuals have expressed their own excitement in acquiring additional information about their family background.  My only regret is that I do not have additional time to spend developing the website and updating it more frequently. I am also collecting information about where former residents of Worms and Rohrbach have settled in the United States.  Sutton, Nebraska, Yankton, South Dakota, and other communities in the Dakotas seemed to have been the major areas of settlement.  Because Sutton was the first German Russian settlement in Nebraska, beginning in 1873, the community acted as a distribution center.  Many of the original settlers moved on to other areas of the United States.
     
    Jim Griess
    Co-Village Coordinator for Worms and Rohrbach

     

  • Rosenberg / Umet, Saratov, Volga

    2009 Village Report for Rosenberg

    Once again it has been rather a quiet year for queries and information about Rosenberg, a daughter colony on the Volga.  During the year I received queries about Kuxhausen, Dahlinger/Schneider, Schmunk (3 separate queries), Sterkel, Rahmig, Huhlmann, Reizenstein (2 queries), Herdt, Stricker/Horst, and Armbruster: sixteen in all.

    From those who enquired I obtained some additional information about the Dahlinger, Seifert, Kuhlmann, Reizenstein, Schmunk, Kuxhausen, and Rahmig families.  For the most part this confirmed details already known but usually allowed me to update more recent generations.  Of all the families the most new information related to the Kuhlmann family.

    At the time of writing, the Rosenberg website is temporarily unavailable as a result of the closure by Yahoo of Geocities.  At the moment the information is stored in a Yahoo business file and in a folder on my computer at home (suitably backed up).  I hope to be able to work on the site to bring it back online during the Christmas vacation.

    Richard McGregor

    Village Coordinator for Rosenberg

     

  • Rosenfeld, North Caucasus

 

  • Rosenheim, Samara, Volga

 

  • Rothammel, Saratov, Volga

  • Schaffhausen, Samara, Volga

    2009 Annual Village Report for Schaffhausen 

    There was one surname enquiry during 2008-2009 for the HELZER family which was handled by me and Pat Lipphardt. E-mail contact was established with descendants of the LIPPHARDT and SPAHNAGEL families, home village of Schaffhausen, who are now living in Germany after migrating from Kazakhstan.

    In the absence of a Schaffhausen First Settlers List (FSL), I am compiling a proxy using the 1798 census and FSLs of villages where settlers wintered prior to establishing Schaffhausen.  Tim Weeder, the Paulskoye Village Coordinator has been very helpful in this endeavour.  Any similar information from other village First Settlers Lists and Movement Tables would be appreciated.

     Information supplied by Pat Lipphardt and Brent Mai (see Mai GER-VOLGA Digest 4/01/2009) indicates that the 1857 census for Schaffhausen is incomplete. This census is contained in LDS Film #2373696 which lists households 1-69 with the remaining households, number unknown, missing.  Obtaining the full census for 1857 would be a great help in establishing the full surname history of Schaffhausen.

     I continue to research Volga Germans who resided in China as part of the White Russian Diaspora. While the Mennonite community in Harbin is well known, little has been published on other Volga Germans who found refuge in China after the Russian revolution. I would welcome any information on this subject.  Patrick Lipphardt has recently updated his "Lipphardts of Russia" research document.  This provides an intriguing overview of the experience of a Volga German family who lived in China during this period.

    I attended celebrations for the 60th Anniversary of the arrival in Australia of White Russians from the Tubabao resettlement camp in the Philippines. This was held in Sydney, Australia and included a fascinating exhibit of photographs and documents that covered Russia, China and Tubabao.  The Tubabao experience is relevant to some of the Volga Germans who resided in China.  To my knowledge the following Volga German families have a connection to Tubabao:  BALLART, BALABOUKHIN, LIPPHARDT, and SONNTAG.  Once again I would welcome any information on these or other Volga German families who transited through Tubabao during 1949-50 when some 5,500 White Russians (including Volga Germans) were resettled to Australia, the USA and South America.

     I must thank the following for their assistance during the year:

    Tanja SCHELL for her assistance to me and the AHSGR in general
    Pat LIPPHARDT  for his  advice and sharing his research
    Tim WEEDER for his assistance in compiling a Schaffhausen FSL

    Thanks also to Vladimir KOKORIN who resides in the Saratov region. Vladimir has published an extensive array of contemporary photographs of what remains of the Volga Villages. See http://imgsrc.ru/main/user.php?user=vovkakak and
    http://imgsrc.ru/main/user.php?user=vovkakak.

     Although the past year has been positive regarding general research, I am a bit concerned about the lack of enquiries regarding Schaffhausen. I would encourage anyone with a connection to Schaffhausen to contact me (see the Volga Village Census Index on the AHSGR website which lists known surnames of Schaffhausen colonists).  Note: Schaffhausen surnames which are not accurately listed in existing census data include ARNOLD, LIPPHARDT and UNGEFUGT/ UNGEFUG.

    Jim Parsonage
    Village Coordinator for Schaffhausen
    Brisbane, AUSTRALIA

     
  • Schilling, Samara, Volga

 

  • Schilling, Saratov, Volga

    2009 Village Report for Schilling Villages

    (Alt-Schilling, Schilling, Konstantinovka, Neu-Schilling I, Neu-Schilling II)

    The Schilling database, consisting of the listed villages, continues to grow in size.  It is a Master Genealogist database, with 11,500 people, 15,900 names and 22,600 events.

    The Schilling mailing list is moderately active.  A number of queries were received in the past year from people in the US, Canada, Russia and Germany, and I continue to help people with their family history in any way that I can.  Queries are answered using family group sheets that are uploaded to a folder on the Schilling web site at:  http://www.schillinggr.org.

    A few people are ordering record information for Alt-Schilling from the Russian Archives in Engels.  Information in the archives for Schilling consists of church birth records for 1764 – 1878, register of the Lutheran congregation for 1865 – 1931, and a family list for 1883.  When information is ordered, Engels does not supply copies of the pages of information, but instead supplies a written report of family information for the requested surname.

    A census for 1857 for Konstantinovka, in Russian, is available in LDS Film 2379339, and will be translated sometime in the future.  The existence of records for the daughter colony Schilling, adjacent to Konstantinovka, and Neu-Schilling I and Neu-Schilling II are unknown.  Some records for Neu-Schilling I and Neu-Schilling II may be including with the church records for Friedenfeld, the primary parish for that part of Samara Province.

    Gary Martens

    Schilling Villages VC

 

  • Schlangendorf, Swedish Colonies, Nikolaev and Kherson
     

     

  • Schönchen, Samara, Volga

    2009 Village Report for Schoenchen


    We received only a few requests this year and are currently working with a researcher whose Herz/Hertz family moved to Germany.  We've had several inquiries we've been unable to answer due to the lack of
    available records past 1857.  We're hopeful that the Schoenchen baptism, marriage and death records found on the LDS microfilm for the years 1879-1914 will be helpful to Schoenchen researchers.  We are in the process of copying the Schoenchen records from microfilm and having them translated.  Anyone interested in assisting with this project or interested in learning more, please contact us.

    Terri Dann and Denise Grau
    Co-Village Coordinators for Schönchen

     

  • Schöndorf, Samara, Volga

    2009 Village Report for Schoendorf
     
    There has been activity in the Schoendorf records in  2009.  Granddaughters of Jacob Wilhelm (born 1888 in Schoendorf, died in Wheatland, Wyoming) and  Alexander Wilhelm (born 1898 in Schoendorf, died in Wheatland, Wyoming) live in Nevada and Wyoming.  I sent them  immigration records, marriage records and other family records this year.

    Laurin Wilhelm
    Village Coordinator for Schoendorf

     

  • Schönfeld, Samara, Volga

    2009 Village Report for Schoenfeld
     
    There has been no activity in the Schoenfeld records in 2009.

    Laurin Wilhelm
    Village Coordinator for Schoenfeld

     

  • Schöntal, Samara, Volga

    2009 Village Report for Schoental
     
    There has been no activity in the Schoental records in 2009.

    Laurin Wilhelm
    Village Coordinator for Schoental

     

  • Schuck, Saratov, Volga
     

     

  • Schulz, Samara, Volga

    2009 Village Report for Schulz

    One of the most pleasant events this year was receiving the names of the first settlers for Schulz as shown in Dr. Pleve's book.  I joined the AHSGR in 1983 and for the last twenty years the question for that list has plagued my life from a lot of people.  Therefore it is with a big THANK YOU to those who were instrumental in preparing the list.

    The 1850 revision list was also found as part of LDS films.

    Peter and Judie Kaland made second trip to Russia to the area where Schulz was. There is only an essence of the village as it existed until the later part of 1941. The purpose of this visit was to document what is left of Schulz by taking a lot of photos to verify what I and my grandaunt Katherine Zitzer Lerch put together on our circa 1919 village map.

    Another significant activity in the beginning of the year, as Susie Hess said in her report:  "there was a meeting in Chicago with 5 other VC's.  It was a productive meeting.  We all learned what each other has done in the past and all learned ways we could work together.  I think it is extremely important that all the village coordinators can work together."  I was one of those VCs.

    Dietz, Dotz, Gorde, Gross, Hartmann, Holzwardt, Richtard, Weber, Weinberger, Yurk,and Zitzer were surnames that I assisted in researching.  I furnished obituaries from my Sheboygan, Wisconsin collection of more than 2200 to various researchers and Susie Hess.

    Fred Zitzer
    Village Coordinator for Schulz

 
  • Schwab, Saratov, Volga

    2009 Village Report for Schwab

    I have received no new data on Schwab this past year.  I have had eight queries, all of which were answered or forwarded to someone else for an answer.

    Up until this year, I have also produced the Lower Volga Villages Sheet.  It has, however, now been discontinued, due to lack of paid subscriptions.  I think that we got blindsided by the overall economy.  Normally December and January were good months for renewals.  This year there were less than 10 renewals.

    Rolene Eichman Kiesling

    Village Coordinator for Schwab

     

  • Schwed, Samara, Volga

    2009 Village Report for Schwed
     
    This year had a wonderful start.

    In February I received the Wiegel chart from Dr. Pleve. It was wonderful, almost 900 names and everything I had hoped for except, where in Germany the Wiegel family came from.  It was most disappointing, but wonderful all the same. I have been able to link several Wiegel families together. Wiegels that grew up in the same area of Chicago, but didn't know how they were related are now true cousins.

    I got together with a group of village coordinators from the Illinois, and Wisconsin area. We shared information, what we were doing, and what we wanted to accomplish. I truly was surprised by all the information the coordinators had and were able to share.

    While the publication of Dr. Pleve's fourth book still contained no Wiegels, I was able to get the German location of several other family names.

    While sharing the Wiegel chart with several cousins, one of them asked if I had a copy of a photo of my Grandfather's brother, wife and children, and my Great grandmother. My Dad had never seen it. It was a great find.

    My Dad celebrated his 90th birthday, with a family gathering of over 50 people. There were many stories, and questions about Schwed, and Russia.  Hoppe, Schnarr, Christ, Kramer and Wiegel cousins, all with roots in Schwed attended.

    I have had several Wiegel inquiries. They are mostly known Wiegels, who we can now tie together. A Herzog inquiry led to the identification of a Herzog chart that was not registered at Lincoln. It is now available via the list of Surname Charts.

    I am still working on developing a web site, and organizing a "Schwed database".

    I agree with Fred Zitzer, and Susan Hess that we need to work together, especially for those villages that are close together.
     
    There is a lot to do, but it has been a very good year for Schwed.

    Keith Wiegel

    Village Coordinator for Schwed


     

  • Seewald, Saratov, Volga

 

  • Shcherbakovka, Saratov, Volga

    2009 Village Report for Shcherbakovka

    I am the village coordinator for the village of Shcherbakovka (aka Tscherbakowka and Mühlberg).  Information for this village can be found at our website.

    Communication activity has been down this year, but I've had contact with several people researching ancestors from our village and was able to supply helpful information to them.  I maintain several databases, but the most helpful is my database that is made up SOLELY from information from the 1798, 1834, 1850 and 1857 Censuses, Pleve charts for our village, and extracted church records from the Lutheran Church in Shcherbakovka.

    Janet Laubhan Flickinger

    Village Coordinators for Shcherbakovka

     

  • Solodyri, Volynsk, Volhynia U

 

  • Stahl am Tarlyk, Samara, Volga

    2009 Village Report for Stahl am Tarlyk 
     
    The year 2009 has been slow in the quest for information about the village and its people.  There have been four inquires and of these, I was able to help three in their search for their family tree.  We are here to help when we can.
     
    Paul Koehler
    Village Coordinator for Stahl am Tarlyk and Bangert.

     

  • Strassburg, Samara, Volga

    2009 Annual Village Report for Strassburg

    I took on the duties of the Village Coordinator for Strassburg in January 2009, and at that point started to collect information on Strassburg.  I received AHSGR information, files, links, databases and materials from Dennis Zitterkopf, Betty Ashley, and Pam Wurst.  I have also received valuable VC assistance from Gary Martens, Janet Laubhan Flickinger, and Hugh Lichtenwald.

    The Village of Strassburg has very little activity.  I have had ten inquiries in the past twelve months. I have participated with other VC's in ordering records from the Volgograd Archives.

    Strassburg had a 1912 population of 2518, and a 1926 population of 2800.  Strassburg GED file has 268 Entries listed with the following surnames:  Heinze, Metzler, Weber, Blehm, Seigfried and Clauser.

    Since the Gedcom file that I received from AHSGR for Strassburg contained any information on a person who had Strassburg in the location name for an event, including death, I received information that included Strassburg, ND, Strassburg, Manitoba, Strassburg, Odessa, Russia, Strassburg, KS, Strassburg, SD, Strassburg, Saskatchewan, and Strassburg, Germany. Only 6 of those 268 entries of surnames listed above are for Strassburg, Samara Province, a daughter colony of Dobrinka.  Index to the 1852 Strassburg census contains 8 pages.

    My only regret is with all of the startup activity in establishing a source of information on the villages, I have not been able to develop a website.

    Ten census records (1850 and 1857) on different villages, which do not include Strassburg, were purchased from Brent Mai.

    Leland Riffel
    Strassburg Village Coordinator


     

  • Strassendorf, Samara, Volga
     

     

  • Straub, Samara, Volga

    2009 Village Report for Straub

    I have had the following inquiries about these Straub families this year: Winter, Schwabenland (5), Bopp, Bollinger, Scharton, Metzler, Roth, and Wirth.
     
    I contacted Brent Mai for help getting the 1834 Straub census from the Engels archive.  Brent reports that the archive is unable to locate this census right now.
     
    Pleve's Volume 4 is available for purchase at the AHGSR Bookstore.   This book has the 1767 Straub first settler's list of 58 families.
     
    I have recently obtained the 1850 and 1857 Straub census records in Russian.  I was translating them until I learned Brent Mai was also working on them.  In 1850 Straub had 101 families, with a population of 952 (486 males and 466 females).  In 1857 Straub had 122 families, with a population of 1170 (595 males and 575 females).

    I continue to collect obituaries, ship records and EWZ records of people who came from Straub.

    Sharon White

    Village Coordinator for Straub

     

  • Swedish Colonies, Nikolaev and Kherson

 

 

  • Unterwalden Meinhard, Samara, Volga

    2009 Village Report for Unterwalden/Meinhard

    Shortly after joining AHSGR last winter, I made the discovery that there had never been a Village Coordinator for Unterwalden, so I volunteered.
     
    Let me first share a bit about Unterwalden.  Unterwalden/Meinhard was a Luthern village established on 12 June 1767 by Baron Caneau de Beauregard.  It is located on the Wiesenseite of the Volga River between Sussanental & Luzern.
     
    Since there was very little information to begin with, I set out to remedy this by writing every possible lead I have been able to find.  I have been able to make contact with several others with ancestors from my village and have been able to share information back and forth with them.  One of the most exciting experiences has been connecting with the grandchildren of my grandfather's brothers and uncles.  This connection was lost over 50 years ago!  My family traveled to Lovell, Wyoming to meet many of them at a Winterholler/Fink reunion.  I was able to see the St. John's Lutheran Church which was constructed by Germans from Russia immigrants, and visit the local cemetery which is the final resting place for many Germans from Russia.  Lovell also has a very small German cemetery. 
     
    I give my thanks to all who have worked so hard to provide a foundation for the rest of us to build upon.  A very special thank you to Kerry Thompson the Village Coordinator for Sussanental, who was so very generous to share her databases with me and gave me a starting point.  I was able to use this as a reference in finding ship manifests, pictures of the ships that our village ancestors arrived on, WWI documents, and census records on Ancestory.com for a number of immigrants from my village. 
     
    I am anxiously awaiting the translation of the 1857 Census which is on LDS microfilm.
     
    I look forward to 2010 and seeing what discoveries and connections are made.  I have a number of projects that I hope to accomplish for the village of Unterwalden, as information is made available.
     
    Pennie Elder

    Village Coordinator for Unterwalden/Meinhard


  • Volhynia

    2009 Village Report for Polish Volhynia


    There have been four queries over the past year.  Two were looking for the location of villages and two researching surnames.

    The highlight of the year was the 2009 Convention in Medicine Hat, Alberta.  The Volhynian guest speakers were Jürgen Janke from Germany and Jerry Frank from Calgary and SGGEE.  Along with Leona Janke, there were three very knowledgeable researchers to help the many convention-goers and members that took part in the Village Night at the Volhynian table.  I made a Polish Volhynian display board to complement the other display boards in Heritage Hall, including a display binder with maps, resources, village names and an index of surnames being researched.  The binder can be used at future Conventions with the Volhynian display in Heritage Hall.  The local newspaper, Medicine Hat News, published a photo of me with the display board.

     In July 2009, I attended the Society for German Genealogy in Eastern Europe Convention in Milwaukee, Wisconsin.  It was very interesting and provided some new sources of information plus the opportunity to network with other Polish Volhynian researchers.  In October, I used the display board and my resources at a Calgary Family Roots Seminar East European Special Event.  There is an increasing interest here in East European research.

     During the year, Lincoln has forwarded to me, new member Family Group Sheets.  My project for the coming year is to create a database and to contact people listed in the "New Member" section of the AHSGR Newsletter.   Surnames being researched include:  Arndt, Berezowski, Benz, Berg, Bieberdorf, Borchert, Busse, Cantor, Chepel, Daher, Domrose, Fetter, Fitzer,  Gertz, Goering, Gramm, Hartwig, Hepp,
     Hiller, Hintz, Hinz, Janke, Jenke, Jenz, Joseph, Kapro(w)sky, Katha, Kathke, Katke, Kopp, Krentz, Lucas, Lutz, Marks, Matz, Morganstern, Muhlbeier, Muehlbeier, Neumann, Nickel, Nikkel, Olufka, Olsufka, Olszowka, Patzer, Pfenning, Plieske, Plines, Plischke, Rappauhn, Rast, Ratz, Rosen, Schroeder, Schultz, Schwanke, Schwandtke, Schwark, Schwarz, Sempf, Ulm, Weick, Wendler, Woitt, Zedelmayer

     A translation by Leona Janke of the book "Legends of the Germans in Volhynia and Polesye" Karasek-Langer/Strzygowski will soon be published by AHSGR.

    Mabel Kiessling
    Polish Volhynia Village Coordinator


 

  • 2009 Village Report for Volmer

    I just took over responsibilities as Village Coordinator for Volmer  this fall, and my website is up, but not quite ready.  It is located at www.volmer.ca

    Angela Gartner, the previous Village Coordinator, has agreed to keep her website up and available, which I think we all appreciate.  I've had some queries which I have answered as best I could.  I am still getting myself organized, and I will work on the Volmer website as quickly as I can.

    Cathy Hawinkels

    Village Coordinator for Volmer

 

  • 2009 Annual Village Report for Walter and Walter Khutor

    This has been an exciting year for researchers for the Volga Bergseite villages of Walter and Walter Khutor.  Our Walter Research project has been very active.  Through the efforts of Doris Evans, Village Coordinator of Frank, records for the various villages of Frank Canton have been obtained.  We are working on donations from Walter researchers to cover the cost of these records. At the present time we will do look ups for Village Coordinators and for contributing researchers. They will be made available at a later date when all the records are obtained and translated, and the records paid for.
     
    Since May, Mary Mills and Jerry McInnis have been translating German and Russian Church records and preparing an index. There is still much to do.  Additionally, we are awaiting some school and military records in the future.  With the new records, the Walter database will expand considerably from approximately 40,000 entries as we add the new births, marriages, and deaths.  There is still a major gap in records from the 1798 census to the beginning of the extant records starting in 1839.  We hope to create an artificial record from various Pleve charts and family histories to bridge that gap.

    Two more volunteers need to be recognized on the Walter Records Project:

              Dorothy Elrod is indexing of thousands of records

              Michael Fyler is doing translations.
     
    We are also combining a number of versions of the Walter First Settlers List and making a new list with corrections and comparisons. There are many errors, even on the new list from Dr. Pleve and Dr. Eisfeld in the four book series.
     
    We have been able to obtain new photographs of the village of Walter and interiors of buildings. Many come from Tanja Schell and Vladimir Krajnev.  Others come from Oksana Dorn. We hope to make these available either on the Walter web site or on a CD.
     
    The web site for Walter is active and maintained by Teresa Sardina and we will eventually do some revisions which will reflect the new material.
     
    The VC's of the Canton of Frank and Brunnenthal are sharing data as we find many of our people crossing into other nearby villages.
     
    Jean A. Roth
    Mary Mills

    Coordinators for Walter and Walter Khutor

 

  • Warenburg, Samara, Volga

    2009 Village Report for Warenburg

    I have had the following inquiries about these Warenburg families this year:  Schroder, Arnst, Kinzel (2), Adolph, Muller, Seibert, Stumpf, Schutz, and Schmidt.

    The 1834 Warenburg census is available for purchase from Brent Mai.  There are 220 families and a population of 2010 on this census.

    Pleve's Volume 4 is available for purchase from the AHSGR Bookstore.  This book has the 1767 Warenburg first settler's list of 179 families.

    I have recently obtained the 1850 and 1857 Warenburg census records in Russian.  I was translating the census records with help from Jacob Leisle until I learned Brent Mai was also working on translating these census records.  In 1850 Warenburg had 269 families.  The census is smudged but it looks like there were 2536 people (1411 males and 1125 females).  In 1857 Warenburg had 303 families.  The population was 3377 (1685 males and 1692 females).

    I continue to collect obituaries, ship records, EWZ records and photographs of people from Warenburg.

    Sharon White

    Village Coordinator for Warenburg

     

  • Wiesenmüller, Samara, Volga

    2009 Village Report for Wiesenmueller, Samara, Russia
    Village Coordinator: CWO H. H. Lichtenwald, US Army (ret.)


    From October 2008 through October 2009, I have sent or received 240 e-mails concerning the village of Wiesenmueller.  Most queries have come from from folks seeking information about surnames on the "Surname Summary" posted on the Jeruslan Nachrichten website or about individuals in the Village of Wiesenmueller database posted on Rootsweb.

    The Wiesenmueller database currently consists of 9,451 souls.  I am slowly purging a number of people from the database who were added during follow-up research of families associated but not actually descended from Wiesenmueller families.  These are mostly US families from which a member married a Wiesenmueller descendant.  I researched these families until I discovered their place of origin and if it was not from Wiesenmueller I ceased researching them.  I have been slow in removing them from the database because their entries represent a lot of work, not just on my part, but also the work of a number of very helpful contributors.

    I began using SKYPE mid-year 2008 and find it a very useful tool in finding, contacting and exchanging information with people interested in genealogy.  SKYPE has been particularly helpful when I interact with German speakers.  When my language skills cause me to err I can immediately see and understand I have made a mistake and can hasten to correct myself...much better than the dead silence I used to encounter using the telephone. I might add that SKYPE is far and away less expensive to use than the telephone. My two year SKYPE subscription costs less than half my monthly domestic telephone bill.

    Hugh Lichtenwald, from the farm in Monetta, SC
    Village Coordinator, Wiesenmueller

     

  • Wittman (Soloturn), Samara, Volga

    2009 Village Report for Wittmann (Solothurn)

    Going through one of my stacks in my office I need to make a  correction to the 2009 report for Wittmann.  I did receive a number of e-mails for this colony mainly from just a couple of people.  I did receive a hand drawn map of the town of Wittmann that was drawn from the time period of 1941.  They sent me two copies, one in Russian and the other in German.  The map details where different businesses were located as well as residents.  As soon as I get this together I will send copies to headquarters and also get a copy posted to my website.

    In 1941 the town had a veterinary, hospital, small oil-pressing factory where they processed sunflower for oil, grain elevator and many more buildings.  The family who sent me this map also sent me a few photographs.

    Kevin Rupp
    Village Coordinator for Wittmann

     

  • Worms, Berezan, Odessa, Kherson

    2009 Annual Village Reports for Worms and Rohrbach

    Black Sea Region

    I have concentrated on sharing information about Worms and Rohrbach through my website.  During 2009, I have had 8096 hits on the website.  The Rohrbach site has received 5679 hits during the year, and the Worms site has received 5653 hits. I want to thank Michael Frank for helping me to set up this website. The information contained there is both historical and genealogical.  My expertise lies in historical information, but the information posted on the site has led to a number of contacts by individuals seeking both additional historical and genealogical data about their family background.  I have also added an article about the fate of German Russians who were purged by the Stalin regime.  Some of the information included was provided by individuals who contacted my website.

    I have been collecting surnames for both Worms and Rohrbach.  This has put me in contact with family members of Reichert, Ehly, Klundt, Bier, Trautmann, Werner, Zimblemann, Gall, Griess, Odenbach, Moser, and other lines whose roots are in Worms and Rohrbach. I have also posted pictures of some of these early residents, which were provided by family members.

    It is exciting to meet individuals who are related to me that I did not know existed.  A number of these individuals have expressed their own excitement in acquiring additional information about their family background.  My only regret is that I do not have additional time to spend developing the website and updating it more frequently. I am also collecting information about where former residents of Worms and Rohrbach have settled in the United States.  Sutton, Nebraska, Yankton, South Dakota, and other communities in the Dakotas seemed to have been the major areas of settlement.  Because Sutton was the first German Russian settlement in Nebraska, beginning in 1873, the community acted as a distribution center.  Many of the original settlers moved on to other areas of the United States.
     
    Jim Griess
    Co-Village Coordinator for Worms and Rohrbach

     

  • 2009 Village Report for Yagodnaya Polyana

    Yagodnaya Polyana has two village co-coordinators: Kris Ball and Patrice Miller.  Elizabeth Meyer needed to step down as a coordinator, but we are grateful for her years of service.

    The village had a good representation by descendants at the AHSGR convention in Medicine Hat.  Many descendants from Yagodnaya Polyana emigrated to the Calgary area and many still live in the area  St. John's in Calgary celebrated their 100 year anniversary and published an updated version of their history book, which included many people who came to Canada from Yagodnaya.

     Two issues of Usu Leut, our village newsletter were published in 2009. Many queries were answered and copies of the village book (published by Kris, Patrice, and the late Bill Scheirman) were purchased and mailed out.  Newsletters for the past 30 years were scanned into .pdf format and copied onto a CD by one of our village descendants, Kristian Andersen.  We plan to update our village web page in the coming year.

    Kris Ball

    Co-Village Coordinator for Yagodnaya Polyana

     

  • 2009 Village Report for Zug

    I have received a few inquiries for Zug, mainly those that overlapped from the other villages.  I continue to add to my database whenever new material is presented.

    Kevin Rupp
    Village Coordinator for Zug

     

  • 2009 Annual Village Report for Zürich

    (also known as Eckardt)

    I started as the Village Coordinator for Zürich in November 2008, and began collecting information and data. This included the English translations of the 1798 and 1834 censuses, at present the only ones available in English.  The 1857 census is in the queue to be translated soon.  At that time I also received all the AHSGR information on file for the village.

    Since my ancestors are from this village, my research on my own family tree is coincident with research on the village, and I have made some progress.

    I also received three inquiries for Zürich this past year, for the surnames Fink, Junemann, and Keil. I was able to give some limited information in these cases, with the intent of following up with more detail when more recent census information is available.

    While these may not seem like many inquiries, they do give me hope that there may be more families with interest in their ancestors from this village. I have no doubt I will also find distant relatives of which I was unaware!

  • Keith Wilberg
    Village Coordinator for Zürich