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Village Coordinator Annual Reports 2011

Villages A-F

| A | B | C D | E | F |

Villages G-L

| G | H | J | K | L |

Villages M-R

| M | N | O | P | R |

Villages S-Z

| S | T | V | W | Y | Z |

VC Newsletter Editor Michael Frank


 

  • Ährenfeld / Aehrenfeld, Saratov, Volga

    2011 Village Report for Aehrenfeld
     

    This year efforts have concentrated on getting the parish records for Kratzke translated from German or Russian into English.  I give special thanks to Dona Reeves-Marquardt for her most able assistance with this effort.  We also have the parish records for nearby Dietel, Kautz, and Merkel, and the families recorded there that are also of interest to those researching Kratzke families.

    There have been dozens of requests for information from various researchers in the US, Canada, Germany, Russia, and Argentina.  In March, as the Director of the Center for Volga German Studies at Concordia University, I made a trip to Argentina and met with some relatives while there.

    There hasn't been much new research done on behalf of the Aehrenfeld families this year.


    Brent Mai

    Village Coordinator for Aehrenfeld

     

     


     

  • Alexanderfeld, North Caucasus
     

 

  • Alexandertal (Neu-Schilling), Saratov, Volga

    2011 Village Report for Alexandertal

    Between late November 1910 and late November 1911, I received and responded to seven e-mails regarding people who had lived in Alexandertal.  Fortunately I was able to acquire for $175.00 a translation of Minkh's 1899 report on Alexandertal.

    My inquiry regarding holdings relating to Alexandertal in the Engels Archive brought the sad report from Bill Pickelhaupt that nothing regarding Alexandertal was recorded in the 1995 Engels Archive inventory.

    I continue to respond to questions regarding the ordering of family charts from the Pleves and to expand and improve the German Origins project as hosted by AHSGR.

    Dick Kraus

    Village Coordinator for Alexandertal

     

  • Alt-Danzig, Kirovograd
     

     

  • Alt-Schilling Saratov, Volga

 

  • Alt-Schwedendorf, Swedish Colonies, Nikolaev and Kherson

     
  • Alt-Weimar

    Surnames for Weimar (Alt-Weimar) include Arne, Bischoff, Braun, Bretmann, Flath, Frank, Gerlach, Götze, Heinze, Horst, Iskam, Kahl, Martin, Meier, Metzler, Michel, Schimpf, Schlotthauer, Schmidt, Schuckmann, Seifert, Seÿfried, Weber, Weimer, Wunder, Ziegler, and Zimmermann.  The source list of these Village surnames was the 1857 Census from Brent Mai received in the early part of 2010.

    Alt-Weimar was founded in 1861 by Lutheran colonists from Galka, Stephan, Schwab, Dobrinka and Moor.

    Villages in the Lower Volga region were given a fixed amount of land, as described in the history section. Land was divided, and re-divided periodically, among the households and families in the village.  By the time the 1850's were reached, the amount of land for each family was so small that families could not grow enough crops to both use as food and sell for income.

    The solution was to found new villages, called daughter colonies, in parts of the Lower Volga region were no villages existed.  Most of these villages were on the east side of the Volga River.

    With all of the startup activity in establishing a source of information on the villages, I have not been able to post to a standard website.

    Leland Riffel
    Village Coordinator for Frankreich, Neu-Galka, Strassburg, Neu-Weimar, Alt-Weimar, & Weimar Villages

     

     

     

  • Amilchin (Emilchin, Emilcin, Amilcin) Volhynia,
    Ukraine, Russia

 

  • Anton, Saratov, Volga

     

     

     

  •  2011 Village Report for Balzer
     

    2011 was a particularly busy year for the Balzer group.

    In May, I gave a presentation at the California District Council (CDC) annual Heritage Fest in Sacramento. The talk this time concentrated on finding our Isenburg roots.

    August brought the Annual Convention in Salt Lake City.  It gave fellow coordinator Darrell Weber and me the rare chance to meet.  Darrell and his Utah chapter put on a super convention.  For a small group they were incredible and an example to larger chapters who think they are unable to host a convention. Village Night at the convention saw a large group of Balzer/Moor researchers.  It was good to see familiar faces and meet new people.  Many found common ancestries through our discussions.

    I took advantage of the great LDS Family History Center while in Utah and was extremely successful in locating new ancestors in Germany, particularly some Kurpfalz families for the first time.  Access to two never before used websites gave me the clues to be successful in finding more Balzer ancestral villages in Germany.

    With the invaluable aid of Herb Femling our Balzer web master, we have completed Volume 2 of our series of Volga German Settlers identified in Isenburg and Other German Church Records.  It is now in print and orders are now accepted.  The volume includes about 200 new entries for ten Volga Colonies.  A list of the new families will be sent to Dick Kraus for entry into his German Origins website.  Kurpfalz discoveries will be included in Volume 3 and hopefully available at the Portland convention next June.

    I had a number of email requests throughout the year from here and abroad and was able to help many of them, but as with everyone else, we cannot be much assistance for those who have yet to connect back to 1857 and earlier.

    Last of all, I am once again publishing a Balzer/Moor Newsletter.  I still am crazy with work and have had some medical issues since the convention, but so much new has come through, I have to report to our loyal group at least twice a year.

    Wayne Bonner
    Co-Coordinator Balzer Colony


     

     

  • Bangert, Samara, Volga

     2011 Village Report for Bangert
     

    There have been three inquires about people for the village of Bangert this past year.  One of those inquires was for whom village was named.  Some research has led to this conclusion:

     In the indices of the Pleve First Settler’s lists is the one that is listed in the Bangert FSL, Johann Heinrich Bangert, age 28 in 1767 from the village of Usingen, Germany.  This is the person for whom the village of Bangert is named.  He had to be a person of good standing in Usingen, Germany.   Heinrich
    then moved to the village of Dietel.


    The Bangert data base has 5389 entries which include the censuses of 1798, 1816, 1834, 1850 and 1857.

    Paul Koehler

    Village Coordinator for Bangert

     

     

     

  • Bauer
    2011 Village Report

I received two inquiries for the village of Bauer and provided informational data on respective surnames.  Several of these individuals originated from the daughter colony Neu-Bauer which was founded circa. 1857 and connections were provided linking them back to Bauer.

In 2012, we will continue to research and look for resources on the Bauerites who settled in Mexico and later immigrated into the United States.  A common theme on the individuals that have been identified to this point is that they only resided in Mexico for a few years and then relocated with relatives who settled in the United States, mostly in Oklahoma.  Another priority this year is to obtain Military Conscription records and Church records for the village which may assist in filling in the missing generational links between 1857 and 1900.

Michael Buck

Village Coordinator for Bauer

  • Borodino, Bessarabio

    2011 Village Report for Borodino, Bessarabia, South Russia

    Like 2010, more and more descendants of the Borodinians around the world are discovering my web site.  For those who have not visited the site I have different methods of dealing with the family charts. I have gone into the records and placed them onto the site as-is. There are no corrections, deletions, or
    speculations. They are what they are. Then I took these names and tried to match children with their parents, and I have clearly marked these as speculations. The next part contains the family charts of people who have sent me their information which may be the same or slightly different from the records.  I've then placed all my e-mails and letters under each section. There are names from A to Z. There are individual family pages with stories, letters, and photographs.

    Connected to this are my own personal ties to Borodino through both my maternal grandparents, Ludwig Michaelovich Hein and Christina Schweikert (Schweigert/Schweickert).  Both were born in 1885 in Borodino.  I knew them both and heard many stories about Borodino and nearby villages. To add to this, my paternal side was also German-Russian who settled in and around Worms/Odessa, South Russia.  By the time I found most of my ancestors, I discovered their lives and migrations cover the area from Bessarabia to Tifilis in the Caucasus Mountains. It has been a great adventure and I have shared much of it with you.

    Hein and Schweikert genealogy can be found at http://www.remmick.org/Hein.Genealogy/index.html.
    Remmick of Worms / Odessa and Hoffer of Neudorf /Odessa at http://www.remmick.org/Remmick.Family.Tree/index.html.

    I’ve been entering of the 1835 Borodino Census.  The 1850 Borodino Cenus is still in progress.  I've completed A - S.

    I have many kinds of maps.  I must have hundreds of photographs.  When you have time, please stop by
    and take a look at my web sites.  Who knows, you might find ancestors or information of interest.
    Genealogy: http://www.remmick.org/Borodino.Bess.Genealogy/index.html
    History: http://www.remmick.org/Borodino.Bess.History/index.html

    My German-Russian House Recipe site continues to grow because of all the generous people who have contributed.  This can be found at http://www.remmick.org/GRHouseRecipes/Page1.html.

    Please, e-mail me, again, if I haven't contacted you by January 1, 2012.

    Again, I'd also like to thank Ingrid Ruele who has gone into the records in places where I never could have reached and has willingly shared. There are far too many names to mention here. They are
    mentioned on my websites.  I can't forget my distant cousin in Germany, Alfred Hein, who
    has sent me many photos of Borodino and a collection from the Heimat museum.  Memorabilia from the museum can be found at http://www.remmick.org/GRMemorabilia/index.html.

    There are always additions to my other web sites. The latest are the addition of names of villagers of Edenkoben / Pfalz.  My Roemmich Ochsner families migrated from this village to Worms/ Odessa, South Russia.

     

    Judy Remmick-Hubert
    Village Coordinator for Borodino, Bessarabia, South Russia

     


    Genealogy:  http://www.remmick.org/Borodino.Bess.Genealogy/index.html
    History: http://www.remmick.org/Borodino.Bess.History/index.html

    My German-Russian House Recipe site continues to grow because of all the generous people who have contributed. The web address is http://www.remmick.org/GRHouseRecipes/Page1.html.

    Again, I'd also like to thank Ingrid Ruele who has gone into the records in places where I never could have reached and has willingly shared.  Steve Mogck’s web site has been a real treasure.  He's not
    returned my e-mails, but that doesn't prevent me from thanking him for all his hard work here and now. Of course, there are far too many names to mention here.  They are mentioned on my websites.  I can't forget my distant cousin in Germany, Alfred Hein, who has sent me many, many photos of Borodino and a collection from the Heimat museum.

    http://www.remmick.orgGRMemorabilia/index.html

    There are always misspellings, typos and errors so if you discover any, please contact me.  All additions are welcome!

    Judy Remmick-Hubert
    Village Coordinator for Borodino


  • Brabander, Samara, Volga

    2011 Village Report for Brabander

     

    It has been another busy and rewarding year for Brabander Colony research.  We now have the 1834, 1850, and 1857 censuses available.  A substantial amount of the church records for Brabander is also available in Russian, but still not translated.  The 1850 and 1857 Brabander Census are available in English, German, Spanish, and original Russian.

     

    The Abt Family Chart prepared by Dr. Igor Pleve, PhD from Saratov, remains the only available family chart for Brabander.  The Bondank, Führ, and Schwalje family charts commissioned with Dr. Pleve in January 2006 still have not been delivered.

     

    The 1857 Brabander Colony Surname Index:

    Brabander 1857 Census

    (Brabander 1857 Zählung)

    (Brabander 1857 Censo)

     

    Surnames (Vornahmen, Nombre) for Brabander include Abt, Aschenmacher, Bartel, Basgal, Bauer, Bieber, Benz, Böhm/Behm, Bondank, Boullion, Braun, Brendel, Brester, Burghof,  Chevalier (see Schwalje), Damm or Dasch, Eberhardt, Ernst, Fest, Freudenberger, Frank, Fuchs, Führ/Fuhr, Gasner, Gertje, Graf, Heidelmann (Heilmann), Hoffmann, Holtzmann, Homann, Kaufmann, Keiler/Köhler, Kern, Klein, Krämer, Kummer, Lagral, Lang, Lehning, Martel, Mauer, Mai, Meringer, Molleker, Munschau, Neubert, Obert, Ott, Rach, Redel, Rojun, Russmann, Schmidt, Schneider, Schreiber, Schwalje, Seitz, Sommer,Stahldecker, Storck, Storm, Vogel, Weht, Wentz, Werner, Wittman, and Zimmer.

     

    There were 178 households recorded in the 1857 Brabander Census:

    (Waren 178 Haushalt ins Brabander 1857)

    (Fue 178 casas en Brabander 1857)

     

    Perhaps the most dramatic event for  2010 was receipt of an hour long video filmed in Brabander by Viktor Martel and his family.  Viktor and his sister Pauline and other family members visited Brabander, filming the entire village, the cemetery and surrounding area.  Viktor even discussed the ownership of various buildings still standing in the village including one owned by his grandfather Alexander Braun, a cousin of my great great grandmother Margaretha Braun. Viktor's video was perfect for all family members who are fluent in both the village dialect and Russian, but for those of us who do not speak Russian we will have to get translations.  We are very happy to have such a treasure with which to work.  Thank you Viktor Martel and sister Pauline and family for sharing your trip video.  Also a special thank you is in order for Dr. Sergei Molleker, PhD who has Molleker, Schwalje and Brester roots from Brabander plus Masson, Kroneberger, Büchner and Östertag roots from Dehler.

     

    In April 2010, Analia DiProspero y Haag from Buenos Aires, Argentina and Andy Kroneberger from Spicer, Minnesota volunteered to help as Village Coordinators for both Brabander and Dehler.  Both Analia and Andy share numerous family lines from Brabander and Dehler with me.  Analia is an agressive genealogist with ancestry from Brabander, Dehler, Preuss, and Holzel and Seewald.  Andy Kroneberger has been a member of the AHSGR for more than 30 years. He has published two books with Brabander and Dehler connections: I FOUND MY FAMILY, which is a Kroneberger, Stoessel, Bohn and Meringer genealogy plus A MAN CALLED ANDREAS, which is the story of his parents Andreas Kroneberger and Margaretha Stoessel.

     

    In April I accepted responsibility as a Village Coordinator also for Hölzel, Preuss, Seelmann and a Dehler Daughter Colony called Maienheim 50 kilometer east of Dehler on  the Steppe.  This Colony was mentioned in a report by Dr. Mattias Haagen, PhD who was a guest speaker at an AHSGR convention.  I didn't really need four more villages to serve as a Village Coordinator, but since I have either direct ancestors or relatives in each of the four villages that have never had a Village Coordinator I saw a need to step forward and attempt to assemble a team of researchers to coordinate and encourage research.  I became a Village Coordinator for Brabander and Dehler in 2006 because there was no Village Coordinator.  Since then I have learned that Brabander and Dehler not only had strong family ties to Rothammel and Seewald, but that there were significant family ties between Hölzel, Preuss and Seelmann also.  Since much of the Brabander, Dehler Preuss, Hölzel,  and Seelmann migrations went to Argentina instead of North America it seemed prudent to recruit some help in Argentina. As a result I pursued help from my cousin Analia DiProspero y Haag in Buenos Aires plus Cristian Jungblut and his wife Eliana Prost from Bahia Blanca, Argentina who are helping as Village Coordinators for Holzel and Preuss. Both also have ancestry from Dehler Colony.  They have published a book in Spanish on the Argentina Colony of San Miguel el Archangel. Both also speak fluent German.  Cristian has a German Language Radio program.

     

    I am anxiously awaiting the completion of  a 900-plus page Eberhardt family genealogy compiled by three cousins: Professor Alexander Eberhardt, Lydia Eberhardt, and Michael Bergen.  Their ancestors left Brabander and migrated to Ludwigstal in the Ukraine where their great grandfather Alexander Eberhardt, born 1855, was the mill owner.  This Alexander Eberhardt married Katharina Materi born in Josephstal, Ukraine and they had 13 children.  As the Second World War wound down, many of the Eberhardt family who were in the Ukraine fearing reprisals against German speaking people migrated into Germany. Those that did not migrate were soon sent to forced labor camps in Kazakhstan or Siberia.

     

    I am still hoping to get a website and Facebook site up for Brabander, Dehler, Hölzel, Preuss, Seelmann, and Maienheim. Unfortunately personal health issues have interfered with productivity again in 2010.

     

    If you have Volga German Ancestry with any of the surnames included in this report I would like for you to communicate with me.  I am actively working on all of the genealogies of all of the Brabander families and I have the census information from 1767, 1798, 1834, 1850, and 1857, and some translated church records, including more that have not been translated.

     

    Best Wishes Always,

     

    Jim Osborne

    Village Coordinator for Brabander

    Submitted 15 January 2012

  • Brunnental, Samara, Volga

    2011 Village Report for Brunnental

    This year was a busy year again for the village of Brunnental/Brunnenthal.  I continue to find new families through my ongoing research using "Ancestry.com".  I've renewed my subscription for another year, as I'm still busy updating one family at a time with census information, military records, death records, passenger listings, naturalization records and passport records.  I have not kept an exact count of queries, but connected with the family of a 17-year-old Goettmann fellow from Mainz, Germany who is related to me.  The Gettmanns in Germany had a huge family reunion, and I was able to SKYPE with them.


    I've said this before but although I keep thinking that I have found all of the families that emigrated from Brunnental, I continue to find more and more each year!  With each family I find, I write letters to living members, asking for additional information and early photos of the families.  I currently have 48,000+ names in my Brunnental database with extensive documentation on each family.  I’m continuing to gather photos for each family.

    I've put together a comprehensive list of all passenger lists of those from Brunnental which can be found on our village website.

    We have also put together a listing of all those Brunnentalers found within the WWI DRAFT REGISTRATION RECORDS which can be found online at Ancestry.com.  This listing of WWI Draft Registrations can also be found on our website.

    We also have an ongoing "listserv" through Rootsweb, where those who are interested in sharing information about Brunnental can "join", and then receive emails from anyone else who has also joined the list. This is where I post such things as obituaries, passenger lists as I find them, or other interesting information about our village.  It's a great way to keep in touch with everyone, and only send ONE EMAIL to reach everyone. You can join our listserv from the Brunnental webpage (see address below).

    This year we started a FACEBOOK group for Brunnental, and it can be found at: http://www.facebook.com/home.php#!/group.php?gid=227886932609. We have been in contact through FACEBOOK with many new Brunnental descendants. I have posted photos of Brunnental there in hopes of attracting new followers.

     

    I want to thank Albert Santorius who was instrumental in getting some additional records concerning Brunnental....these cover two areas:

    1) Lists of those from Brunnental who came from Chelyabinsk region and who were killed in the gulags in the years 1942, 1943, 1945, 1946.

    2) Lists of those from Brunnental who were killed/shot by the NKVD in Engels during the years 1937/1938 after trials by the state attorney of Saratov.

     

    I, of course, could not do any of this research without the help of all of the descendants from the village of Brunnental.  You are such an enthusiastic group of people, and you keep me motivated to continue to gather the history and genealogy of our village. Thanks!!!

    Sherrie (Gettman) Stahl

    Village Coordinator for Brunnental

     

     

  •  2011 Village Report for Chasselois
     
    I will pledge this next year to have a better year as far as setting new goals for the projects I wish to complete for my villages.  I have been working so hard to complete my book about my parents, I feel I have maybe neglected my villages somewhat, although I have continued publishing my
    quarterly Newsletter ( a goal of mine).  I do answer all inquiries as soon as I gather the information, and have kept on top of that Village Coordinator duty.

    During the year, I received - (and these are grouped with Louis, Russia) - approximately 119 inquiries. Several of these were requests to have their names added to my Newsletter list.  Eight of these were requests for information that actually needed to be referred to a different Village Coordinator which I did.  I actually don't mind doing this, and feel we need to help everyone, but I always feel left out of the loop so to speak. I never hear back to know if they found their information or not, and if I should help them further. Only one VC kept me in the loop and that was Kevin Rupp.  It was very good of him.

    Several of these requests for information were from other countries, and I actually feel that I am improving on my German and Spanish languages - another goal of mine.

    I am now planning on getting my information ready for the next Convention.  I wanted to get to the SLC Convention so that I could see how the Villages were portrayed.  I hope they continue to do this project, so I can show my villages.

    I think I had only two queries concerning this destroyed village of Chasselois.  It always pleasantly surprises me when someone asks about their ancestors from this village.


    Thelma Mills
    Village Coordinator for Chasselois

     

     

  • Dehler, Saratav, Volga

    2011 Village Report for Dehler

    It has been an amazing year for Dehler Colony research.  The 1857 Dehler census was translated from Russian to German, English, and Spanish and is available.  The 1850 Dehler census has also been translated from Russian and is available in Spanish, German and English.  Masson family church records for Dehler colony from the Brabander colony church have also been obtained and are available in Russian, German, English and Spanish.  A 65-page "Stammeliste" genealogy list of Masson descendants including addresses, photos, e-mail addresses and telephone numbers has been received from relatives in Russia and Germany.  We are currently arranging to obtain more church records. 

     

    During the last year I was finally able to obtain copies of some of the film of the trip of Adan and Andreas Stoessel, the famous automotive explorers from Arroyo Corto, Buenos Aires, Argentina.  They hopped into their 1928 Chevrolet convertible along with two mechanics and headed north to New York in 1927, long before most of the roads were built.  I am still hoping to obtain a copy of their journal and the book published in 1930.  I have published a report entitled THE FABULOUS HERMANOS STOESSEL for the Northern Illinois Chapter AHSGR Newsletter along with a segment of their genealogy.  Their grandfather was Michael (Miguel) Stoessel born 1815 in Dehler colony, Russia who migrated to Argentina in the 1870s along with three of his sons and their families.  Miguel Stoessel was the "Vorsteher" of Colonia San Miguel named after him and commonly called Dehler by the inhabitants.  The route that Adan and his brother Andreas took through Central America and Mexico became much of the Pan American Highway.

     

    At about the same time that the Stoessel Brothers were driving north to New York from 200 miles south of Buenos Aires, their cousin Margaretha Stoessel, the widow of Thomas Bohn, was being smuggled out of Russia with the help of Isdor Trausch, the older brother of Professor Mattias Trausch.  Isdor and Mattias were sons of Mattias Trausch (1873-1934) and Katharina Kroneberger (1877-1942) and first cousins of Andy Kroneberger and also Kroneberger cousins of my grandmother and Kern cousins of my grandfather.  From 1927 to 1928 few Volga Germans got out of Russia. The courageous story behind the smuggling of Margaretha Stoessel and her two remaining sons Thomas and Eduard Bohn out of Dehler to the United States is the subject of A MAN CALLED ANDREAS, by Andrew Kroneberger, a Dehler Colony Village Coordinator and 30-plus year member of the AHSGR.  Margaretha Stoessel was Andy's mother.  Initially Isdor Traush had planned to send Margaretha and her two sons through Veracruz, Mexico and then move them by land to the United States using parish priests to move them.  At the last moment it was decided that the trip through Mexico was not safe for them.  Andreas drove to New Orleans and then took a ship to Havana, Cuba to intercept them.  In Havana he and Margaretha got married.  This qualified Margaretha for entry to the United States immediately, but her two sons had to remain behind in a Catholic Orphanage for nearly 2 years before they were able to migrate.  By the time these two sons of the Volga German Colony of Dehler arrived in the United States they were speaking fluent Spanish. The change of plans that interrupted Margaretha Stoessel and her sons’ trip to Vera Cruz was probably prudent.  Mexico was not safe even for Adan and Andreas Stoessel who were robbed in Northern Mexico and lost one of their cameras.  I can only imagine the surprise that could have occurred if Margaretha had been moved north from Veracruz along much of the same corridor that her cousins took in their journey north to New York.

     

    Other mysteries such as the ancestry of Jose (Joseph) Östertag, born Dehler 1879, and dying in Santa Maria, La Pampa Argentina in 1931 were cleared up by the translation of the 1857 Dehler census. His father was known as Ignacio to the family in Argentina and found in the 1857 Dehler census as Ignatius Östertag born 1851, son of Michael  Östertag (1826-1852) and Katharina Hammerschmidt, born 1830.  His wife was Anna Maria Günther, born 1848.  Ignatius was born after the 1850 census and was not included on the Östertag family chart produced by Dr. Igor Pleve, PhD from Saratov.  In recent months I have been in contact with descendants of Ignatius Östertag who remained in Russia and have in recent years migrated from Kazakhstan to Germany.

     

    I was able to obtain superior images from the original handwritten 1857 census in Russian and Dr. Viktor Chevalier (Schwalje), PhD kindly did the translation from Russian to German.  The surnames of some of the spouses who came from other villages created some major problems with the index on the final document, but most have been resolved.

     

    From the Dehler 1857 census index, the following surnames are recorded:

     

     

    Allerborn, Aman, Appel, Appelhans, Basgal, Bauer, Bauser, Beck (listed as Bech and Boch), Becker, Bell (probably Beil), Bender, Berger, Beringard (possibly Weingardt), Betz, Bieber, Bohn, Bondank (Bontemps, Bondang, Pundang), Brabander, Braun, Brendel, Büch, Beck, Buchner (Bochner, Boechner, Pogner), Burghof (Burghoven), Christiani, Decker (Deckner), Denk, Ding, Dries, Dumrauf (Dumerauf, Tumerauf), Eberle, Ekler, Ernst (Erst), Fehd, Flehr, Frank, Freidenberger, Frid, Fritz, Fuhr, Fuchs, Gahl, Gasner, Gauschmann?, Herbstsommer, Gerger, Gerringer (probably Meringer), Gilter/Hilter, Glock, Graf, Günther, Gutes, Gutler, Haagen (Haag), Hambalger sz?, Hammerschmidt, Hamm, Hall, Haas, Heil, Heilmann, Homann, Gafner/Hefner (Häfner, Heffner), Hergenrother, Herotter (probably Hergenrother), Hammerschmidt, Hermann, Gorn/Horn, Huncher, Jung, Kaiser, Karp, Keiler (Kohler with an umlaut), Kremmer (Kramer), Kern, Kerner, Kessler, Klaus, Klein, Kreheman, Kroneberger, Krotter, Krotener (probably Krotter), Krug, Kruss?, Kilb/Kulb, Lauchner, Lemich?, Maibach, Maul, Martel, Masson, Max, Maier, Mil?, Milgin? (possibly also Miltenberger), Mildenberger (Miltenberger), Minor, Miron (possibly Meringer), Molleker, Munschau, Nasch?, Nowak (Nobak), Nungesser, Ninscher (probably Nungesser), Obert, Ostertag, Ostermann, Raab, Redel, Ritter, Rolheiser, Ruppel (earlier spelled Ruppelt), Schäfer, Schecktel, Schell, Scholl (probably Schell), Schmidt, Schneider, Schreiber, Schefer (Schafer), Schlotter, Schrefer?, Schuck, Schwab, Schab (probably Schwaab), Schwalje/Chevalier (Schwalie, Schwalje, Schwalie, Schwalier), Schneider, Schweigert, Schwemler (possibly Schwenzel), Schwengel (possibly Schwenzel), Seewald, Stoessel, Storck, Schturm/Storm, Trausch, Turban, Uhlman, Uril?, Useldinger, Vogel, Weinmeier, Weisz, Wentler, Wentz, Werner, and Zittler.

     

     

    (Translation of German names written phonetically in Cyrillic script is not an easy task especially when it is written by Volga Germans.  Most male surnames that are common to a village can be deciphered even if they were badly recorded in Cyrillic script by someone familiar with the surnames of the village.  The maiden names of the wives were not recorded in most cases in the 1834 and 1850 Dehler colony census.  Fortunately the 1857 Dehler census revision included most of the wives’ surnames. Those transcribing the census also did a phonetic interpretation of the German name in Russian. As a result, many of the wives’ names are still questionable derivations of the actual surnames.  Hopefully later research will clarify the surnames. That clarification could occur with translation of the church records for Dehler and Brabander.  After the first Dehler church burned, sacraments took place 3 miles away in Brabander for a period of more than 20 years.  Brabander baptismal records do record those families baptizing children were from Dehler.)

     

     

    Jim Osborne

    Village Coordinator for Dehler

    Submitted 15 January 2012

 

  •  2011 Village Report for Dinkel

     

    I have had four to five people requesting information on Dinkel this year.  I was able to help with four of them.  I had no information for the other. For one person I was able to give some information that she did not have for the family.

     

    Salt Lake City was a good convention site, but not a good one for helping people interested in Dinkel. I
    had no information seekers.  Again I thank Sharon White and others for helping me with questions concerning their villages and mine.


    Leroy Nikolaisen

    Village Coordinator for Dinkel

     

  • Dobrinka, Saratov, Volga

    2011 Village Report for Dobrinka

    During 2011, I received over 20 inquiries regarding people from the village of Dobrinka (Nizhnyaya Dobrinka).  Information on the current status of Dobrinka can be found in a 2001 trip report by Ed Hoak, which is online at http://www.lowervolga.org/hoak.html

    I continue to maintain a website about Dobrinka at http://www.dobrinka.org/.  Pictures of today's Dobrinka can be found at http://www.dobrinka.org/today.html.


    In 2009, the available church records consisting of birth records (1852-1867, 1882-1894), death records (1904) and marriages (1894, 1895, 1905) and the Family List (1832-1846) were purchased from the Russian Archives in Volgagrad, with the help of contributions from 25 people.  Since then additional people have contributed towards this purchase, and anyone interested in these records can make a contribution for records on one surname, or all available records.

    I initially extracted birth records for surnames of interest to those who initially contributed to the purchase, and over the past year or more, have also extracted birth records for the surnames of interest, for those who contributed after the initial purchase.  I continue to extract the birth records for other people in Galka, starting with the early years.  I continue to expand the Dobrinka database with the church records, and also with information on those who immigrated to Canada, the United States, Mexico, Argentina and Brazil.

    In the past year I have also offered and sold Descendant Box Charts for all descendants of people who immigrated to Dobrinka, or branches of those families.  The charts are generated using my Dobrinka database and The Master Genealogist program.  The charts I've sold have varied in size from 12x36
    inches up to more than 20 feet long. Anyone interested can purchase charts for people/surnames from Dobrinka by contacting me.

    Dobrinka is also part of the Lower Volga Villages Project, and the website for that group, which I maintain, can be found at http://www.lowervolga.org/.

    Gary Martens
    Village coordinator for Dobrinka

     

     

  • Dönhof, Saratov, Volga

    2011 Village Report for Doenhof
     

    The year 2011 was a very typical year for village inquiries. We had approximately 20 inquiries about surnames and were able to answer them all with the information in our database.  We did add the names from two Pleve charts, and the database now contains 17,200+ individuals.  We spent most of the summer communicating with a German living in Russia whose grandmother was from Doenhof.  He spoke no English, and we sure couldn't speak any Russian.  Thank God we have on-line translators that are adequate to check genealogy.  His maternal side had 12 surnames from Doenhof, and he had never heard of a GEDCOM. Now he knows how to use one and learned a lot about his ancestors as well.

    The convention in Salt Lake City was the worst we have ever attended because of low attendance, and we have gone to them for the past 11 to 12 years.  We had a total of 7 people there who were interested in Doenhof genealogy.  There was only one couple that we had not met but had communicated by e-mail.  Perhaps next year in Portland there will be better attendance.

    Dick and Judy Leffler
    Village Coordinators for Doenhof

     

    I had several inquiries for Donhof this past year including some ongoing research from previous years.  I continue to add to the data base for surnames for Donhof and work on tracing the movements of colonists.

    I am also working on translating letters and records written in the old Germanic script that pertain to Donhof families. I also have had inquiries regarding the Donhof map from the early 1900's and where families lived prior to their immigration.

    I continue to collect information for Donhof from Internet resources and from descendants sharing their information, pictures, letters, etc.

    On a local level, I am continuing to collect data on our community and surrounding area for German-Russian families, as this area had a large German-Russian population. Much of that research pertains to the 1906 German-Russian church that we moved and are preserving. That is an ongoing project and we had an interesting visit this past summer from the great-granddaughter of one of the first pastors of the church during the 1906-1925 era.  She shared pictures and family history for which we are most grateful. We continually have visitors from all over the
    country at the church, many of whom have a past connection through family and often share family information with us.

    We look forward to continuing the Donhof and local research in 2012.

    Karen Kaiser
    Co-Cordinator for Donhof

     

     

  • Dreispitz, Saratov, Volga

    2011 Village Report for Dreispitz
     
    Over the course of 2011, I received approximately 40 inquiries from Dreispitz researchers residing in the United States, Germany and Canada.  With the assistance of Mark Wills, our newest Village Coordinator, the following  surnames were researched:  Beisel, Boger, Diehl, Ehrlich, Feil, Galliart, Groff, Heinze, Herbel, Keller, Kindsvater, Loewe n, Lohrentz, May, Mueller, Niedens, Ratzloff, Schneider, Schoenhals, Steinle, and Wollert.

     

    I am pleased to report that our hard work paid off as we were able to furnish information regarding most of the inquiries.  Further, over the course of the past year’s research, we made several more connections with my Heinze, Schneider and Steinle surnames.

     

    I would like to make note of an unusual inquiry that came to my attention.  This inquiry was looking into organizations regarding the Volga Germans that are trying to (or already are) studying familial early on-set dementia or Alzheimer’s.

     

    I am incredibly appreciative of the time Mark has devoted to researching and his dedication to furnishing information in response to inquiries.  His decision to step into the role of Village Coordinator will be an asset to many for years to come.


    I have received many obituaries from persons requesting that I show them in the Lower Volga Obituary Project.  I collected approximately 900 obituaries between January 1, 2011 and November 1, 2011. The full obituary may be seen in the SOAR website, and an abbreviated obituary may be seen in the
    Lower Volga Obituary Project website.


    As Village Coordinator for Dreispitz, I helped with the Minkh Book Project by paying for the translation of the village of Drespitz.  Translation has been completed on the "History and Geography of Saratov Province" by A. N. Minkh, published Saratov, 1898.  Verkhnyaya Dobrinka, Dobrinka Dreispitz was known as "Lower Dobrinka".  This translation will be used for an AHSGR Monograph to be printed in the future showing me as donor.  Further, I have given permission for the translation to be posted to both
    the AHSGR and the CVGS websites.


    Dobrinka Verkhnyaya (Verkhnyaya Dobrinka) aka Dreispitz, is a German colony located near Pulkovo, on the right bank of the Dobrinka river, which flows into the Volga at Nizhnaya Dobrinka colony.  It is situated 180 verstas from Saratov and 35 verstas from Kamyshin.  The colony was founded in 1766-1767 by people who came from Germany, Sweden, Switzerland, and France.  There are also the Poles here (Sokolovskii), the French (Dike and Chira/Schira) but they all blended into one German element.


    When I attended the International AHSGR Convention in Lincoln, Nebraska, in August of 2010 I was asked by a member of the Central California Chapter AHSGR to write an article on the village of Dreispitz. The article was printed in their February 2011 Newsletter.


    It was a great honor to be awarded the American Historical Society of Germans from Russia AHSGR Special Citation on August 6th, 2011, at the convention at Salt Lake City, Utah.  Unfortunately, I was not able to attend.  However, Mark Wills graciously accepted the plaque on my behalf.  It is with much gratitude that I mention that the villages of Shcherbakovka and Dreispitz have been allocated to receive an extremely generous bequest left for their benefit to AHSGR by the Timothy A. Montania Living Trust.
    These funds are to be used for the retrieval of all records and documents of any historical nature concerning the German village of Shcherbakovka.  Further, if any funds remain when the task is deemed completed, said funds should be used for the same purpose with regard to the village of Dreispitz,
    and then for any other village in the former Autonomous German Volga Republic. The AHSGR Board of Directors has authorized the appointment of a committee to establish priorities and payment of funds necessary to obtain the materials as per the requirements of the bequest.  I hope that there will remain funds to search and secure available records for Dreispitz and other villages, particularly those after 1858.


    I continue to be active in our local AHSGR Golden Wheat Chapter.  I work in the Chapter Library in the afternoon the second Friday of every month, a scheduling change that seems to be more advantageous to those seeking information.  I am pleased to have helped serve new members in their research
    during this time, as well as a few unassociated people that have found their way to the library.


    Rachel E. Smith
    Village Coordinator for Dreispitz
    Chairman of the Lower Volga Obituary Project

     

     

    2011 Village Report for Dreispitz
    Co-Village Coordinator Report
     
    This was my first year of being a Co-Village Coordinator for the village of Dreispitz and I must admit it went by extremely fast.  As a newbie I have had a lot of help and have been blessed to work alongside Rachel Smith who has been a wonderful mentor.  Through her dedication and knowledge about the
    people and the village I have learned a lot.


    Throughout the year I have had a number of surname requests from within the United States.  In addition I have collected information on Dreispitz families with the surnames of Beisel, Heinze, Galliart, Mueller and Steinle.

    In August I attended the convention in beautiful downtown Salt Lake City.  Opening night was very interesting as I learned all about the Mormons and their journey from Nauvoo, Illinois to Salt Lake using hand carts to carry their belongings.

     

    Kerry Christensen a Yodeler thoroughly entertained us with his talent to yodel and his ability to play a variety of instruments.  While attending the convention I took advantage of looking through many
    things that dealt with my village such as old newsletters, books, the SOAR database and the village file. In addition I found a number of family books that had been donated to the AHSGR library that had connections to Dreispitz.  A copy of the Dreispitz 1834, 1850 & 1858 census records were purchased to add to my collection of resources.


    At the Village Area Workshop (formerly Village Night) there were only about four people that stated their Ancestors were from the Village of Dreispitz.  Unfortunately by the time we went around the table and talked about all the other villages that were being represented as part of our area we were out
    of time.


    After the convention I stayed a few days in Salt Lake City to do some more research at the LDS Research Library.  It was good to finally see what the library was like and what they had to offer.  In addition to my research I have also been maintaining the AHSGR Store website.


    Mark Wills
    Co-Village Coordinator for Dreispitz

     

  • Eckheim, Samara, Volga

    2011 Village Report for Eckheim

     

    I received several inquiries this year from different people regarding their Eckheim ancestors. The surnames which came up were Heidt, Heide, Heinitz, Nuss/Nusz, Mühlberger, and Youck

    The translated 1857-1858 Census for Eckheim is now available from Brent Mai.  It gives the maiden names, plus the village from which they came.  This has made tracing the families further back in time much easier.

     

    Marina Politova, a resident of Moscow, Russia, has been instrumental in helping me obtain the list of Eckheimers who were victimized, the deportation list, the list of people issued passports, plus the birth records for Mühlberger, Keil, and Schaefer children who were born in Eckheim 1870-1904.  This also gives the mother's maiden names, which gives an added dimension to this important record.

     

    Besides those mentioned above, the maiden names included for the surnames Mühlberger,  Beck, Gaas, Haas, Jakel, Karg, Klein, Knaus, Kuxhausen, Lotz, Mai, Rein, Schaefer, Strecker, Weibert, and Wingert.

     

     Included for the surnames Keil and Schaefer are these maiden names: Arntd (?), Batz, Eberhart, Frikel, Knaus, Kuxhausen, Lamm, Mai, Marker, Marks, Melzer, Mühlberger, Nuss, Schwarz, and

    Zwehzig (Zwetzig).

     

    Marina also sent me the list of people who were deported in September, 1941 from Grimm, Frantsozen, and Stefan in Krasnoyarsk.  The storage location of the document is the State Archives of the Krasnoyarsk Territory.

     

    Marina has been a tremendous help to me.  Her email is famuehlberger@gmail.com.

     

    I also have an extensive list of EWZ files (War Records and BDC Data), using the Query Eckheim and War Records at the FHL (familysearch.org).

     

    Suzanne Heinitz-Dodge

    Village Coordinator for Eckheim

     

     

     

     

  • Eigenfeld, North Caucasus

     
  • Eigenheim, Akkerman, Bessarabia

 

  • Enders, Samara, Volga

    2011 Village Report for Enders
     
    Inquiries for 2011 include the surnames of Mueller, Schoenwolf, Biel, Gitler, Ohlberg, and Ehlert.

    Census records are available for Enders for the years of 1767, 1798, 1834, 1850, 1857.  An 1874 Enders Family List, with additions to 1896, is held by a previous village coordinator.  Surname charts are available for the surnames of Baerns, Deckert, Dotz, Enders / Endersen, Hardt, and Mueller.

    The Enders webpage can be found at http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~enders/ and includes a link to Enders on Facebook.

    I have posted village photos thanks to Marilyn Murray and continue to seek ancestral photographs.

    Many Enders descendants settled in the Chicago area.  I’m considering a co-coordinator from Illinois.

    Beth Mueller-Rohn Davenport

    Village Coordinator for Enders (Ust-Karaman)

 

  • Erlenbach, Saratov, Volga

    2011 Village Report for Erlenbach
     

    I did not have much to report - only several requests with interest in names in the United States.  My sister and I are in contact with the relatives that are now in Germany.  They have very little information of Erlenbach.  The only ones born in Erlenbach are elderly and ill.  I don't think I will ever be able to visit them in Germany again, as traveling has become difficult.  I will be very happy to share what information I may have, but did not think I had much to be published in the VC reports.

     

    Hilda Gillig Weber

    Village Coordinator for Erlenbach

     

  • Fischer, Saratov, Volga

 

  • Friedensdorf

     

  • Friedrichsfeld, North Caucasus

 

  • Frank-Kolb Village Database, Saratov, Volga

    2011 Village Report for Frank

    During 2011, we completed a project that we had started last year when the Kulberg List books were first published.  Our goal was to see if we could locate all of the families who were known to have been early settlers of Frank in both the Kulberg Lists and the Transport Lists.  Out of 138 families that were known to have been early settlers in Frank, Doris and I were able to locate 122 families in the Kulberg List book, and 53 families in the Transport Lists. This was not merely an academic exercise.  There
    were several cases where we were able to identify the parents of individuals who arrived in Frank as orphans.  I printed out copies of the analysis and made it available to anyone at the Salt Lake City AHSGR convention who wanted a copy.

    The main focus this year has been on translations.  I've been primarily working on Frank marriage records.  We have an almost complete set of church records for the years 1839-1910. I've gotten through the marriages for the years 1839-1851, a total of 588 marriage records.  I've also spent some time on the death records, completing the years 1839-1842, a total of 508 death records.  Anyone who has looked at these handwritten records knows what a slow and tedious process it can be to decipher the sloppy handwriting and guess what might have been written in an unreadable portion of a damaged
    page.

    Once I've got a year of records translated, I check each record against the information we already have from other sources such as Pleve charts.  The most common error that I am finding is that the engagement date has been substituted for the marriage date, which is just a minor annoyance since
    there is normally only 4 to 8 weeks between the two events.  The second most common error is engagements that did not actually result in a marriage have been included as actual marriages.  I have also found more serious problems such as people being misidentified or subsequent marriages being missed, but this has not been a common occurrence.  Doris makes the necessary corrections in the database.  It's a slow process, but necessary in order to generate the most accurate information possible for Frank descendants.

    The data for the villages of Frank and Kolb are combined into one database.  Because of this, Doris and I also spend a great deal of time translating and organizing Kolb family data. The main focus this year has been translating the Kolb Military Conscription Records, which we have for the years 1884-1917. These records are going to prove to be very helpful.  Each year of records lists all of the men who turned age 21 that year, including men who had gone to America. The record gives the draftee's date of birth, his
    father's name and age, sometimes lists his brothers' names and ages, and notes whether he is married or not, sometimes including names of children.

    The draftees are listed in order of the household number on the 1857 census.  In order to tie each family into the correct household number, we obtained copies of the Kolb 1857 census from the archives in Russia.  Much to our surprise, this original census includes maiden names.  The reason this came as a surprise to us is because AHSGR sells a Kolb census compilation including the 1857 census.  The AHSGR book does not report the maiden names. In addition to the omission of maiden names, I have discovered numerous children and in several cases entire families omitted from the 1857 data in the AHSGR book.  We knew there were problems with this book, but we had no idea how serious the problems were until we compared it with the original 1857 census.  We are now going through the 1857 census line by line and making the necessary corrections and additions in the database.


    As far as answering queries and research requests, I would say the pace is similar to previous years. I typically receive one or two new requests each week, and occasionally receive follow up requests on previous research.  We receive queries from a variety of sources - the Facebook page, one of the two web sites, the Frank Rootsweb mailing list, or new member information provided by the AHSGR office.  I am generally able to provide Frank descendants with complete ancestor reports, including German origin information. I still have the occasional situation where I'm not able to tie someone definitively into the database, but this has become less frequent as I have become more comfortable with translating the church records.

     

    I give many thanks to Tanja Schell and Judy Jarret for their invaluable assistance in translating both German and Russian records.

     

    Visit us on Facebook at

    http://www.facebook.com/#!/pages/Frank-Kolb-Russia-Database/336156650349.
    Visit us on the web at http://www.frank-kolb-russia.org/.

     

    Prepared by Maggie Hein

    On behalf of the Frank Village Coordinators, Doris Evans and Maggie Hein

     

  • Frankreich, Samara, Volga

     2011 Village Report for Frankreich

    Surnames for Frankreich include Ehrlich, Eichmann, Geier, Lattner, Lorenz, Messerschmidt, Reich, Schmidt, Schwab, Wunsch, and Ziegler.   The source list of these village surnames was the 1857 Census from Brent Mai received in the early part of 2010.

    Frankreich was founded in 1861 by Lutheran colonists resettling from Galka, Shcherbakovka, and Schwab.

    Villages in the Lower Volga region were given a fixed amount of land, as described in the history section. Land was divided, and re-divided periodically, among the households and families in the village.  By the time the 1850's were reached, the amount of land for each family was so small that families could not grow enough crops to both use as food and sell for income.   The solution was to found new villages, called daughter colonies, in parts of the Lower Volga region were no villages existed.  Most of these villages were on the east side of the Volga River.

    With all of the startup activity in establishing a source of information on the villages, I have not been able to post to a standard website.

    Leland Riffel
    Village Coordinator for Frankreich, Neu-Galka, Strassburg, Neu-Weimar, Alt-Weimar, & Weimar Villages

  • Galka, Saratov, Volga
    2011 Village Report for Galka

    During 2011, I received about 25 inquiries regarding people from the village of Galka (Ust-Kulalinka).  Information on the  current status of Galka can be found in a 2001 trip report by Ed Hoak, which is online at http://www.lowervolga.org/hoak.html.

    I continue to maintain a website about Galka at http://www.galkagr.org/.  Galka, was the Lutheran parish, or central church for the Lutheran congregations in Driespitz, Dobrinka and Holstein.  The church in Galka was established in 1767.

    In 2009, the available church records consisting of birth records (1863-1884, 1901-1902), death records (1904) and marriages (1894, 1895, 1905) were purchased from the Russian Archives in Volgograd, with the help of contributions of twelve people.  Since then another six people have contributed towards this purchase, and anyone interested in these records can make a contribution for records on one surname, or all available records.

    I initially extracted birth records for surnames of interest to those who initially contributed to the purchase, and over the past year, or more, have also extracted birth records for the surnames of interest, for those who contributed after the initial purchase.  I continue to extract the birth
    records for other people in Galka, starting with the early years.  I continue to expand the Galka database with the church records, and also with information on those who immigrated to Canada, the United States, Mexico, Argentina and Brazil.

    In the past year I have also offered and sold Descendant Box Charts for all descendants of people who immigrated to Galka, or branches of those families. The charts are generated using my Galka database and The Master Genealogist program.  The charts I've sold have varied in size from 12x36 inches up to 20 inches by 30 feet long.  Anyone interested can purchase charts for people/surnames from Galka by contacting me.

    Galka is also part of the Lower Volga Villages Project, and the website for that group, which I maintain, can be found at http://www.lowervolga.org/.

    Gary Martens
    Village Coordinator for Galka

     

     
  • Glückstal Colonies Research Association

    2011 Village Report for Glueckstal Colonies

    Bergdorf, Glückstal, Kassel, Neudorf, Grigoriopol, and Hoffnungstal

    GCRA continues to centralize all records for the group of mother colonies, daughter colonies and chutors that make up the Glueckstal colonies.  The primary areas of record keeping and development are:
         1) Points of origin of Glueckstal families.
         2) A master GEDCOM for all Glueckstal families.
         3) Ship passeger records for all Glueckstalers who came to North America (we have not identified any former Glueckstalers who emigrated to South America).
         4) Martryology records of those murdered by Soviet Authorities in the 1930s.
         5) The EWZ (Einwandererzentralstelle = Nazi immigration records) of those Glueckstalers who were evacuated by German troops during the “Trek” from South Russia to Polish-occupied territory in 1941.

    We continue to acquire copies of documents relevant to the Glueckstal colonies from Archives in Ukraine.  In the past year we have been successful in acquiring documents from a previously inaccessible archive, which cannot be identified for the present.  In this project we have also cooperated with and coordinated the acquisition of documents from the same archive for GRHS and Black Sea Area Mennonite colonies.  Documents which we acquire for GCRA are translated and published, with commentary.

    We continue to issue two Newsletters per year, and maintain a website (
    www.glueckstal.net) and a members-only listserv.

    Our membership is holding relatively steady at about 350 members.  Non-renewals are generally offset by new members.

    GCRA has not received many inquiries requesting information this year.  Most of those received requested the translation of letters received in North America from relatives in the former colonies.

    I did a presentation on the History and Practice of Brauche (the German faith-healing tradition) among the Germans from Russia at the annual convention of GRHS in Spokane.  As a result of that presentation, one of the attendees shared a copy of a document by an unidentified author (found among the papers of his grandmother), consisting of healing recipes organized by key ingredients (such as garlic and camomile).  I have completed a transcription of the original German text, and am in the process of completing a translation.

    During the annual convention of AHSGR in Salt Lake City, I coordinated the Area 14 Village Meeting (Glueckstal colonies & Hoffnungstal colonies) since no Village Coordinator of the Hoffnungstal colonies was in attendance.

    GCRA is scheduled to publish a collection of translated letters from Glueckstalers prior to the GRHS & AHSGR conventions this next summer.  The letters date from 1927-1932 and appeared in the Eureka Rundschau (published in Eureka, SD) and Der Staats-Anzeiger (published in Bismarck, ND).

    Submitted by
    Homer Rudolf

     

  • Gnadenfeld, (Neu-Moor/Moor), Samara, Volga

    2011 Village Report for Gnadenfeld
     

    In the past year I have assisted four people researching Gnadenfeld families.

    I referred one person to Walerji Scheck, coordinator of the colony of Gnadenfeld for Volga Germans in Europe. I assisted two people with research from other colonies.

    I have the 1857 census for Gnadenfeld.  Since many of the people from Gnadenfeld came from the village of Moor, I have purchased the 1775, 1798, 1834, and 1857 census records for Moor.  The biggest problem is finding the information to connect a person to the 1857 census.

    Irma A. Waggoner

    Village Coordinator for Gnadenfeld

     

     

  • Goebel, Saratov, Volga

    2011 Village Report for Göbel
     

    Goebel, also known as Gebel, Goebel, Göbel, Ust-Gräsnucha, Ust-Grjasnucha, Ust-Grjaznucha, Ust-Gryaznukha, Ust-Grasnukha, or Ust-Graesnucha, was a Russian Catholic German village situated on the western side of the Volga.

    I took on the duties of the Village Coordinator for Göbel around September 2009.  I am continuing to add to the chart of names, births and marriages known regarding this village using Family Tree Maker.

     

    I received AHSGR information, files, links, databases and materials in addition to the 1798, 1816/1834 and 1850/1857 census reports I had already obtained from AHSGR, Rosemary Larson and Brent Mai respectively.  I also have a copy of Pleve's Volume II with the FSL for Göbel.  This year I acquired Göbel birth records (1894-1900) from the Volgograd archive, with the help of Kevin Rupp.

    Approximately 10 different people contacted me this year regarding the village and I was able to help most folks out with at least some information they did not previously have.  I was referred contacts by fellow VCs and also made references to contact other VCs.  I also have been sharing information with other VCs with Göbel-related questions and some common surname contacts, especially among the Roman Catholic villages.  Most contacts were from the U.S., but I also have been enjoying exchanges with contacts from Canada and Russia.  Correspondence with one of the contacts from Russia has been particularly rewarding.

    Ben Markel
    Village Coordinator for Göbel

     

  • Graf, Samara, Volga

     2011 Village Report for Graf

    Things have been somewhat quiet for this village over the past year, but I still receive a few e-mails a month from people who live in the States as well as in Germany and Russia looking for information.  I continue to operate my website, www.volgagerman.net and update my Graf site, www.volgagerman.net/Graf.htm

    I am still working on getting all the families from the 1878 family list a couple of families at a time.  This year I received the 1878 family list for the family of Schmidt to add to my collection.

    Resources available at this time include:

    1.  Kulberg lists

    2.  First Settlers lists

    3.  1834 Census

    4.  1850 Census

    5.  1857 Census

    6.  1878 Family List - Incomplete

    7.  1895 Family List - Complete

    8.  Birth Records for the years: 1889, 1890, 1894, 1897, 1908, 1911, 1914

    9.  Marriage Records for the years: 1912 & 1914

    10.  Death Records for the years: 1890, 1911, 1914

    11.  Maps, which are available on the web site to look at.

    12.  Memorial Records

    I was very fortunate this year that Tanja Hermann Nyberg found some memorial records for me for Graf. These are also available to look at on my website.   As a goal this year I hope to keep better track of the requests that I receive.

    Because of the large amount of Volga-Germans that settled in my area, my website deals with a variety of villages.  I am Village Coordinator for some and others I am not.  Any new information that I obtain is posted on those respective sites as well as the name of the Village Coordinator and what they may have available.

    Kevin Rupp
    Village Coordinator for Graf

 

  • Grimm, Saratov, Volga
    2011 Village Report for Grimm

    During the past year we had about nine inquires that we were able to assist and two or three we could not help.  We have created and maintain a roster of 42 individuals doing research on the colony of Grimm.  We continue to add to our Grimm data base which grows with each inquiry.

    Ken Leffler
    Village Coordinator for Stahl am Tarlyk
    John Groh, Assistant
    Henry Schmick, Assistant

 

  • Güldendorf, Grossliebental, Odessa, Kherson
     
  • Hoffnungstal, Akkerman, Bessarabia
     
  • Holstein, Saratov, Volga

    2011 Village Report for Holstein

     

    2011 was a fairly busy year for Holstein research.  I took some things with me to the 2011 AHSGR Convention in Salt Lake City, hoping that I would see Brent Mai, and that he would be able to translate them for me.  Brent showed up on Wednesday, and agreed to translate them for me.  He said that the Concordia College would like to have the information as well, so we worked out a plan whereby I permitted him to have the information for the college in exchange for the translations.

     

    I now have the Christ Lutheran Church, Confirmation Register, from Winnipeg, Manitoba, for the years 1889-1922.  These are people who went to Manitoba from the Volga region.    In all, there are 420 entries from many Volga villages, including Holstein.  If any VC would like to know if their village is represented, please send me an email.  Information included is the person's name, birth date, birth place, and Confirmation Date.

     

    I have put together a list of Holstein immigrants to the U.S. and Canada, with their death place and date of death.  This list is only a partial list however.

     

    I have the 1798 full census, the male names from 1816, full census for 1834, 1850, 1858, and I am happy to look up any names for you.

     

    In my possession I also have "German Migration to the Russian Volga 1764-1767", by Brent Mai, which contains some Holstein names.

     

    I am continuing the work on the combined church records for Holstein.  It has proven to be a slow process, however, as I have experienced a spell of poor health.  I will continue to compile the information, and announce when it is completed.  It is just taking me longer than I had expected it would.

     

    This was the first year that I attended a convention as a Village Coordinator, and it was very helpful for me to see what other VC's have done for their villages.  I hope to, and plan to attend the convention in Portland, in June.  If anyone has Holstein ancestors, or questions related to Holstein, please send them to me in advance so I can have answers for you at the convention.

     

    Suzanne Heinitz-Dodge

    Village Coordinator for Holstein


  • Holzel, Samara, Volga

    2011 Village Report for Holzel

    We are proud to announce that Hölzel colony, a Catholic Village on the Wiesenseite or meadow side east of the Volga River also has village coordinators for the first time in AHSGR history.  Cristian Jungblut and his wife Eliana Prost volunteered to help as village coordinators with me for both Preuss and Hölzel.  They have ancestry in both of these villages along with Dehler colony.  Much of the outward migration from Hölzel and neighboring Preuss migrated to Argentina, very early populating early Catholic colonies in Argentina along with other settlers from Brabander and Dehler. 

     

    Very early in my Volga German research I saw a need to study additional families from other colonies because of the extensive movements recorded in the 1798 CENSUS OF THE GERMAN COLONIES ALONG THE VOLGA by Professor Brent Mai.  I soon found out that I not only had ancestry from Brabander, Dehler, Rothammel, and Seewald, but I also had direct lines out of Hölzel and Preuss with relatives moving to Seelmann.

     

    For Hölzel colony we are also in a better position than when I volunteered to be the Brabander and Dehler Village Coordinator in 2006.  We have the 1767, 1798, and 1834 Census translations. The 1850 and 1857 Hölzel Census are on track to be translated by Brent Mai very soon.  Additionally we have been able to obtain copies of the original handwritten Russian version of the 1850 and 1857 Hölzel censuses.  I also have microfilm that contains segments of the Hölzel church records not translated from Russian.  I am anxiously awaiting the translation of the 1857 Hölzel census which will also contain surnames of the wives which allows establishment of family ties that cannot be made without the wives’ surnames.

     

    These are the Hölzel surnames recorded in the 1834 Census:

     

    Abelt, Ahlerborn (This family also married into Brabander colony.  The family had early migration to Argentina.), Altvater, Amen, Bald, Bauser  (This family also married into Dehler colony and has strong family ties with the Führ family.), Berger, Bessler, Braun, Deiloff, Diepner, Dumerauf  (also translated as Tumerauf), Eckler, Feldt, Frank, Friez, Goeringer, Grasser, Haagen  (The Haagen and Haag families from Hölzel, Preuss, and Dehler appear to have common roots originating in Hölzel.), Herbstsommer  (This family had early migration to Argentina.), Hippendinger, Hoffmann, Kessler, Klock  (This family has also been translated Glock with movement to Argentina.), Kreismann, Lauchner  (Part of this family migrated to Dehler and were recorded in error as Büchner.), Lehmann, Mehler, Mehrlein, Morbi, Mossmann, Müller (The grandmother of village coordinator Analia DiProspero y Haag has roots in this family.), Namm, Nieser, Rau, Redel   (I have direct ancestry from this family in Brabander.), Rolheiser, Ruppel (Ruppel and Rupelt in Holzel appear to be the same family with branches of the family in Dehler.), Rost (Rost family members also migrated to Brabander very early.), Rupelt, Schafer, Schaumkel, Scherer, Schmidt, Schneider, Schweigert, Storm      (The Storm/Schturm family had early migration to Brabander colony where they were confused with the Storck family that migrated from Rothammel colony in the census translations.), Strovinski, Wagner (This Wagner family had early migration to Argentina that was allied with the Herbstsommer and Führ families.), Weingardt, Weinhauf, Wett (I have direct ancestry from this family that went to Brabander.), Ziegemann (I have direct ancestry from this family that went to Brabander.)

     

    Jim Osborne

    Village Coordinator for Hölzel


     

  • Huck, Saratov, Volga

    2011 Village Report for Huck

    The year 2011 was slow if I use correspondence quantity as a measure of success.  I had only one inquiry from Russia, one from Germany, none from Argentina, and an assortment of inquiries from researchers in the U.S.  I suspect the lack of contacts from Argentina has been affected by the lack of Huck records from 1858 to 1888. Most of the Argentinian inquiries have asked about their grandparents or great-grandparents who would have been born during that period.

    Inquiries I did receive included questions about the following Huck surnames: Schneider, Hempel/Kempel/Kembel, Leichner, Kindsfater, Bohl, Huck, Schwabauer, Weigandt, Mader/Meder/Maden, Libsack, Geier and Zitterkopf.  I share what information I have and have again been pleased this year by the willingness of people to send me information about their own family
    history.  In prior years I haven't always been as successful for the exchange of information.  When I respond with what I have I also inform them of Huck researchers who have an interest in the same surname.  I make sure those researchers are aware of the inquiry and what I've sent the person.  I've had excellent support from other coordinators when an inquiry I received has involved movement from or to another village. I make sure I not only inform the person about the coordinator of the other village that could be used as a resource and also inform the coordinator or those coordinators who might
    be contacted (or want to contact the person).

    Several recent inquiries have asked how they can obtain copies or information known to exist in the Russian Archives.  I refer them to the assistance services described in
    http://ahsgr.org/Services/russian_archives_records.htm and also describe the option of requesting information from Dr. Igor Pleve (both in electronic form and the descendant charts).  That is probably the biggest level of frustration I sense in the messages I receive, and while I share their pain, I have no simple or easy solution to share with them.

    We were sent the 2010 versions of the Family History List and the Annotated Bibliography as I asked but staff changes and replacements in 2011 resulted in the 2011 version not being distributed to us.  I've requested that again.

    Dennis Zitterkopf
    Village coordinator for Huck

     

  • Husaren, Saratov, Volga
     
  • Hussenbach, Linevo Ozero, Saratov, Volga

     2011 Village Report for Hussenbach

    The highlight of the year, for me, was attending the Convention in Salt Lake City. I was able to meet many of the people that I have been corresponding with over the past few years. Although busy, I enjoyed the new format of the village night, which for my group was the Canton of Frank and parts of Kamenka.  Many of the participants were able to go from village to village to inquire about their ancestors.  This also gave me the chance to meet the other Village Coordinators with whom I had been corresponding and sharing data.

    I also took advantage of the opportunity to visit the Family History Library.  I was able to make a connection to my great grandmother’s family in the Swedish records. This was truly exciting, as my family knew nothing about her family beyond her birth date and parents’ names. Since then I have been able to add all grandparents for five more generations because of the excellent Swedish record collection. I learned how to access this collection in one of the Convention seminars on using Ancestry.com. I thought I was a fairly savvy user of Ancestry, but I did learn some new information at the seminar I attended.

    I have continued work on translating the records I received via Doris Evans from the Volgograd archives. I have completed the translation of the births, deaths and marriages for years 1818-1839, births 1840-1847. I have integrated them and the 1857 Census into the Hussenbach data base. David Nelson has translated the 1896-1904, 1906-1908 birth records that are written in Russian and German. I am very appreciative of his help in this endeavor, as I do not read Russian. I believe the 1872-1895 Birth records and the 1882-1890, 1896-1899 Death records are for the village of Neu-Hussenbach (Gaschon) as the Pastors’ names (Stärkel, Weber) are not the ones listed for the parish of Frank. The database now contains over 25,600 people.

    I have created an Excel page showing which Family names are found in different sources, including: Kuhlberg lists, Volga transport list, 1798, 1816, 1834, 1850, 1857 censuses, Volgograd records to 1845, and Hussenbach database. You can download the file from my Hussenbach web page: http://hussenbach.weebly.com/names-found-in-records.html. It is 16 pages, and includes some of the names found in the daughter colonies of Ährenfeld, Langenfeld, Neu-Bauer and Neu-Hussenbach and their original colony if known.

    My Facebook contacts in Argentina have been very helpful with providing information about the Hussenbachers who settled there. I have also received inquiries from Russia. Germany, Canada and the USA from 36 Hussenbach descendants and many Village Coordinators resulting in over 300 email exchanges. I have exchanged files with other Village Coordinators in the Frank Canton such as marriage records and GEDCOMS. There is a great group of VC’s in the Frank Canton and I think we have all benefited from the exchange of data. There was lot intermarriage between the villages; my own family has connections to Frank, Hussenbach, and Kolb.

    I paid for the translation of the report on Hussenbach written by A. N. Minkh, and found in the Historical and Geographical Dictionary of the Saratov Province (Saratov, Russia, 1898. It is expected to be posted on the AHSGR and CVGS websites at some point.

    Sources available for Hussenbach Research:

    A History of the Colony of Linevo-Ozero (Hussenbach) in the Volga Area: 1768-1941, by N .E. Vashkau and I. V. Kukhtina, translated by T. I. Vorontsova, edited by Jerome Siebert

    German Migration to the Russian Volga (1764-1767): Origins and Destinations, by Brent Mai and Dona Reeves-Marquardt. I found 4 marriages and 1 birth for future residents of Husssenbach.

    Lists of Colonists to Russia in 1766 – Ivan Kuhlberg Reports, by Igor Pleve. I found 103 family names and 412 persons, a descendant of which resides at some point in Hussenbach, either immigrating directly to Hussenbach, marrying into the village or moving to Hussenbach at some point.

    Transport of the Volga Germans from Oranienbaum to the Colonies on the Volga 1766-1767, by Brent Mai. I have found 47 family names and 165 persons, which have a Hussenbach connection at some point.

    1798 Census of the German Colonies along the Volga, by Brent Mai. I have found 188 family names and 949 persons, listed for the village of Hussenbach. Many of the new family names married into the village from other villages.

    1834 Census of Hussenbach in the District of Saratov, Russia, translated by Brent Mai.

    Lists 2,301 people and 185 family names, maiden names may have been added from other sources.

    1857 Census of Hussenbach in the District of Saratov, Russia, translated by Brent Mai.

    Lists 100 family names with links to 3800 villagers.

    Spack, Alexander, comp. "Gussenbah." Die Geschichte Der Wolgaduetschen. wolgadeutsche.net, 2011. Web. 8 July 2011. Gussenbach.

    Surname Charts: I have accessed 51 different Surname Charts, which have a connection to Hussenbach, either from the Collection of Loiuse Potter or through the SOAR database.

    Records found in the Volgograd Archives:

    Births: 1818-1838, 1839 -1846, 1896-1904, and 1906-1908 have been translated, 1847-1876, 1877-1887, 1888-1895 still have to be translated.

    Marriages: 1818-1838, translated, 1902-1908 still have to be translated.

    Deaths: 1818-1838, translated, 1839-1858, 1862-1881, 1882-1890, 1891-1895, 1900-1908 still have to be translated.

    The Hussenbach database continues to grow. I appreciate all of the information fellow Hussenbachers have shared with me. I have found numerous times that the information from one person combined with another’s can be the connection that links that family back to the German immigrant ancestor.

    Susan Hopp Nakaji

    Village Coordinator for Hussenbach

  • 2011 Village Report for Johannestal

    During 2011 I received three queries about family in Johannestal.  For two of those I was able to supply some information. All of the queries were obtained from folks finding me on the Internet.  Unfortunately my Internet Service Provider, Cox Communications, will no longer be providing free webspace.  I was able to secure webspace on the GRHS server and Mia at the GRHS converted the old web pages and placed them on the GRHS server. Hopefully the search engines will be able to find this new location. It can be now be found at: http://www.grhs.org/korners/heinle/johannestal.html .

     

    Ray Heinle

    Village Coordinator for Johannestal

     

  • Josefstal / Schwabe Khutor, Saratov, Volga
    2011 Village Report for Josefstal

    As always, due to its small size (1500 or so), there are very few inquiries about Josefstal.  Not to be deterred, I continue to collect data and information that I can about this village.

    Right now I am tracking down residents of Josefstal that moved to Argentina, using the great digitized records available on the Family Search web site.

    I am putting various materials on the Josefstal web site, making it freely available to researchers.

    Ted Gerk
    Village Coordinator for Josefstal

  • Jost, Samara, Volga
    2011 Village Report for Jost
     
    Inquiries for 2011 included the surnames of Bischel, Haupt, Wenig, Flack, and Meisner.

    The Kulberg Lists include most of the Jost first settlers.  A few found in the Oranienbaum Transport Lists cannot be positively identified without more specific information.

    Census records are available for Jost for the year 1767, 1798, 1834, 1850, and 1857.  Surname Charts are available for Klemm and Weidenkeller.  Birth records for 1794-1811 are available from the AHSGR store thanks to Dodie Rotherham.  In addition, I have Stier births for the year 1795-1863.

    The Jost webpage can be found at http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~jost/ and includes a link to Jost on Facebook.  I have posted village photos thanks to Dodie Rotherham and continue to seek ancestral photographs.


    Beth Mueller-Rohn Davenport
    Village Coordinator for Jost (Popovkina)


  • 2011 Village Report for Kamenka

    E-mail requests from Argentina were numerous.  There were requests for Schwab, Heil, Zwenger, Biehn, Keller, Bohn, Schlitter, Heim, and Floehr surnames.

    From Russia there were many e-mails on the surnames of Floehr, Baehr, Urban and Schwindt.  Three requests were froMaderm Germany for the surnames Miller/Schmidt, Weimann, and Roth/Schechtel.  The U.S. requests were for the surnames , Baier, and Schwindt.  I answered requests for other villages as well.

    From AHSGR the Kamenka census for 1775/1798 and the First Settler Lists are available.  The 1834 and 1850 revision lists are available from me.  In the 1850 Kamenka census the names of the spouses are listed as well as the heads of household.

    During this year it became known that there is an 1857 Kamenka revision list [census] in Saratov. Requests can be made through Mila Koretnikova at milakoretnikov@yahoo.com.  The origins of the first settlers of Kamenka are found at the AHSGR website: http://www.ahsgr.org/FindAncestors/german_origins.htm

    This year my family made a DVD available for Wiesner descendants.  Since technology has changed so much it is much easier to mail a DVD.  The Wiesner family reunion was held in Hays, Kansas in June of 1979--one hundred years after the arrival of the Wiesner family in Ellis County, Kansas.  I contacted those that I could find by phone and many DVD's were mailed.

    Rosemary [Wiesner] Larson

    Village Coordinator for Kamenka

     

     

     

  • Katharinenstadt, Samara, Volga
    2011 Village Report for Katharinenstadt

    We have had several requests this year from Germany.  What we could not answer we coordinated with Kevin Rupp who also has several records on this town.  We have records on the Lutheran church there and Kevin has records on the Catholic church there.

    Raynona & Marvin Bohrer
    Village Coordinators  for Katharinenstadt
    Friends of the Engles Archives

     

  • Kassel, Glückstal, Odessa, Kherson

 

  • Kautz, Saratov, Volga
    2011 Village Report

    It has been a fairly standard year for Kautz research. I processed 28 obituaries received from Henry Schmick and two obituaries from two other individuals, which matched against my Kautz database. As of today, the database now contains 28,032 individuals and 9,259 marriages. The software I use is Family Treemaker for Windows.

    Several requests for the surname Kautz were answered. Georg Jakob Kauz, his family arriving in Kautz 20 May 1787, was mayor of Kautz and the village was named after him. Unfortunately, the Kautz family in Kautz did not remain in the village. Before 1788, the family had moved to Merkel colony. There is no current Merkel village coordinator through AHSGR.

    I currently correspond with one lady from Verl, Germany interested in the Gradwohl line and another from Reutlingen, Germany interested in the Neubauer line. One request for information on the Benzel line came from Germany. Some of the requestors have both Kautz and Kazakhstan connections. Several requests have come in Russian, some in German. I find that Google Translate does a good job in allowing me to communicate with these ‘cousins’. As long as the English-Russian or English-German translation is translated back to English, and a little tweaking of the words or phrases is done (if necessary), then all goes well.

    I correspond with many people from the United States who have Kautz ties and I am normally able to provide substantive information to them from their initial query. In many cases, I’m able to get additional information on their families. This is then entered into the Kautz database with citations.

    Two people requested videos of George and Elaine Frank Davison’s 1991 trip to Kautz which is currently on two DVDs. In 2011 I sent 25 CD’s of Unsere Leute von Kautz (Our People from Kautz) to people with ancestral ties to Kautz. The CD, about 439 mb, contains a wealth of information including family group charts, history, stories, maps, letters, recipes, group photographs, photographs of the remains of the village from 2007, descendant charts and genealogy charts for the primary surnames of the first settlers of Kautz, photocopies of Pleve charts for these major families, and many extracts of information from the Kautz database, converted to Excel then to HTML format. The CD is basically a large Web Page detailing the 10 paper volumes of Unsere Leute von Kautz which Elaine published in her lifetime and the electronic volume I produced after her death in 2001. My volume, volume 9, is 212 pages.

    Information from Bill Pickelhaupt regarding Rev. Dsirnes’s work related to Kautz and Dietel will be added to the Kautz CD soon with his permission.

    I am making changes to the Kautz website and will complete the changes in late January.

    Since I live only about 15 miles from Concordia College in Portland, I should be able to attend the 2012 convention. I hope you will all be able to attend. The campus and library is nothing short of amazing and the work done by Brent Mai, the Portland Chapter, other regional chapters and scores of other individuals who have devoted time, effort, funds, and contributions to the Center for Volga German Studies there is to be commended. Besides, Portland is a pretty nice city to visit for any reason.

    Michael Frank
    Village Coordinator for Kautz (Werschinka)

     

     

     
  • Klosterdorf, Swedish Colonies, Nikolaev and Kherson

     
  • Köhler, Saratov, Volga

    2011 Village Report for Köhler
     
    I had one inquiry regarding a Casper Rosenbach family of Colorado.  Nick and Barb Bretz, the other co-village coordinators, would have some inquiries as well.

    According to my part of the Koehler village database, which contains about 10,500 names in the American portion, the following are the most popular surnames based on those living in the U.S. as of 1920 including their spouses:  1. Ziegler / Zeigler (54 names);  2. Reichenborn / Reigenborn / Richmond (44);  3. Bretz (40);  4. Haspert (38);  4. Macht (38);  5. Bellinder / Bellendir (30);  6. Steinbock (30);  7. Rosenbach / Rossbach (29);  8. Mildenberger / Miltenberger / Miltonberger (25);  9. Koehler / Kahler (26);  10. Gareis / Garris (28);  11. Klug (27).

    I am also researching other Volga German Catholic families.  The most popular is the very large Dreiling family, including their spouses as of 1920, with a total of 458 names.


    David Haspert
    Co-Village Coordinator for Köhler

 

  • Kolb, Saratov, Volga

    2011 Village Report for Kolb
     

    As Kolb Village Coordinator, I have not been very active this past year due to health problems and a death of one of my sisters.


    I had about six inquiries I have been able to help.  Not all were from Kolb backgrounds.  At present I am researching two surnames, Bier and Hoffman, which are that are part of a family that is distantly related to me by marriage but not from Kolb.

    Kelly Horst, Asst VC for Kolb and Maggie Hein, Asst VC for Frank have set up a Frank-Kolb website.  A work in progress with new items being added as time allows.  The site is also are on Facebook.

    Thelma Sprenger

    Village Coordinator for Kolb


  • Konstantinovka, Samara, Volga

    2011 Village Report for Alt-Schilling, Konstantinovka, Schilling, Neu-Schilling I and Neu-Schilling II

     During 2011 I received about thirty inquiries for the original Schilling village and its daughter colonies, except Alexandertal.

    I continue to maintain the website for Schilling at: http://www.schillinggr.org/.  There is also a Rootsweb mailing list for Schilling, with instruction for subscribing at:
    http://lists.rootsweb.ancestry.com/index/intl/RUS/RUS-SARATOV-SCHILLING.html.

    I continue to look for information on the first settlers at Alt-Schilling.  They are not included as extras in the first settler books by Dr. Pleve titled Einwanderung in das Wolgagebiet 1764-1767.  I will be looking in the book "The Kuhlberg Lists" by Dr. Pleve.  Some information on original settlers can be found at http://schillinggr.org/schilling_org.html.  A brief summary of information concerning Schilling daughter colonies can be found at http://schillinggr.org/schillings.html.


    Church records for Alt-Schilling are at the Russian Archives in Engels, and during the year the director of the Archives confirmed what records they have for the original village:  birth & christening books 1764-1878, register of the Lutheran congregation 1865-1931, and a family list (similar to census) for 1883. The Archives in Engels does not sell copies of the original records. They will create reports (in Russian), depending on your search criteria.  Schilling researchers have provided me with reports obtained for
    several surnames.  A small report containing about thirty names covering the 1860-1885 time period costs about $400, and a complete report for a surname with many names, covering the 1850-1920 period will cost between $1000 and $1500. There are some additional records for Schilling at the Russian Archives in Saratov.

    Church records for Konstantinovka, which probably includes the adjacent daughter colony of Schilling are at the Russian Archives in Saratov, and cover approximately 1860 to 1915.  Records for Neu-Schilling I and the nearby village of Neu-Schilling II are also at the archives in Saratov, and cover approximately 1860 to 1915. Exact information on what records are available is not known because in December 2011 the Russian Archives in Saratov first told me it would take 7 months to do a search of the records, then informed me that they are now charging approximately $25 to do a search, and payment must be made directly to their Russian bank account, which can only be done by someone in Russia.

    During the year several Schilling researchers received reports on people living in Alt-Schilling, Konstantinovka, Neu-Schilling I and Neu-Schilling II.  One report was commissioned through Dr. Pleve and included computer generated charts and a printed report.  The reports were generated by the
    archives in Saratov and Engels, and the charts were not the traditional hand drawn charts from the Pleve's.

    Pictures of Alt-Schilling in 1994, and an accompanying trip report can be found at: http://schillinggr.org/today.htm

    Gary Martens

    Village Coordinator for Alt-Schilling, Konstantinovka, Schilling, Neu-Schilling I
    and Neu-Schilling II

 

  • Kraft, Saratov, Volga

     2011 Village Report for Kraft

    This has been an interesting year.  I’ve always thought of progress being measured in terms of additions to our data base.  For the first time, I actually filed all my email traffic.  The 2011 total came to 136 emails from 26 different individuals.  Though I was able to provide at least some help for almost everybody, the challenge remains in establishing a direct link between the migrating ancestors and their antecedents enumerated in the 1857/58 census.

    I was able to obtain translations of some church documents several years ago, but they have not been very helpful.  I envy those of you whose village leaders kept more complete records.

    Ron Burkett

    Village Coordinator for Kraft

     

  • Krasnojar, Samara, Volga
    2011 Village Report for Krasnoyar

    During this year the 1850 and 1857 census records were translated and those provided a wealth of information.  Unfortunately it also provided some new challenges.  I received two new queries for the village and worked with those people as well as others with whom I have had contact with in the past.

    Susie Weber Hess
    Village Coordinator for Krasnoyar

     

     
  • Kratzke, Saratov, Volga

    2011 Village Report for Kratzke
     

    This year efforts have concentrated on getting the parish records for Kratzke translated from German or Russian into English.  I give special thanks to Dona Reeves-Marquardt for her most able assistance with this effort.  We also have the parish records for nearby Dietel, Kautz, and Merkel, and the families recorded there that are also of interest to those researching Kratzke families.

    There have been dozens of requests for information from various researchers in the US, Canada, Germany, Russia, and Argentina.  In March, as the Director of the Center for Volga German Studies at Concordia University, I made a trip to Argentina and met with some relatives while there.

    There hasn't been much new research done on behalf of the Aehrenfeld families this year.


    Brent Mai

    Village Coordinator for Kratzke

     

     

  • Kronental, North Caucasus

 

  • Kukkus, Samara, Volga

    2011 Village Report for Kukkus
     

    The Kukkus data base now contains over 13,000 names. The most recent updates were to add Reitz family names.  These updates filled in a lot of unknown wives which was a real help.  I am hoping sometime soon, there will be a census for 1870, 1880 or 1890. This information would really help to find marriages for the grandparents who immigrated in 1899 and later.

     

    Most of the queries this year were for persons from other villages. Those requests were directed to the
    correct village coordinators.  I am looking forward to 2012 and working on the database, cleaning up
    more duplicates and combining name variations.

    Eleanor Sissell

    Village Coordinator for Kukkus

     

  • Kulm, Bessarabia

 

  • Kutter

    2011 Village Report for Kutter

    The best news for our obscure little Kutter is that for the Casper, Wyoming, convention I wrote a history of Kutter.  Then I submitted it for the story writing contest.  Now it is being published in the MEMORIES FROM THE HEART - Stories Told by Germans from Russia compiled by Dr. Velma Jesser, Lincoln,
    Nebraska, 2011.  It is available in paperback for $25.00 through the website store or you can send check or money order in the amount of $32.32 to AHSGR.  I can supply a copy of the Kutter history.

    I continue to record information for each family, such as ships' lists, naturalization, census, stories, notes, etc., as I find it.  However, I have done no computer research and would like to have another Village Coordinator with which to work who could do more aggressive research.

    Newsletters that Esther Trekell and I published previously are still available, as well as color copies of buildings in Saratov and information as to Germans who owned them.

    I have received queries from Germany, Russia, and Argentina and have sent any information that I have to them.

    Frances Nelson
    Village Coordinator for Kutter

 

  • Laub, Samara, Volga
    2011 Village Report for Laub, Tarlyk, Russia

     

    Inquiries for Laub have been very steady over the past few years.   It seems as though more and more people are tracing their roots and realizing there is information through AHSGR and village coordinators.

     

    Most of the inquiries are from the states but this past year there has been a great deal of interest from South America and Germany.  I have almost daily contact with several people in Argentina who have given me many contacts and lots of information!

     

    The Laub family trees are growing and now have at least minimal information on at least 50% of the family names and approximately 10 family trees.

     

    Last year at the Salt Lake City Convention I had, for the first time ever at a convention, a family doing Laub family research.  That was a great morale booster for me and I was able to connect them to a contact in Argentina researching the same name.

     

    I do not have a web site but do have a Laub, Tarlyk, Russia web page.  For general German Russian research I have created a Facebook page called German Russian Connections.  This page can be accessed by going to www.facebook.com/groups/1827120225143981/.  Anyone seeking information on their GR connections can post on the page once they join the group.

     

    Dodie Reich Rotherham

    Village Coordinator for Laub, Tarlyk, Russia

     

  • Lauwe, Saratov, Volga
    2011 Village Report for Lauwe

    During 2011, I received six queries about family in Lauwe.  For four of those I was able to supply some information.  I was able to meet one of those in person and go over some data this summer.  Most of the queries were obtained from folks finding me on the Internet.  Unfortunately my Internet Service Provider, Cox Communications, will no longer be providing free webspace.  I was able to secure webspace on the GRHS server and Mia at the GRHS converted the old web pages and placed them on the GRHS server. Hopefully the search engines will be able to find this new location. It is now:  http://www.grhs.org/korners/heinle/lauwe/lauwe.html.

    Ray Heinle

    Village Coordinator for Lauwe

     

     

  • Leichtling, Saratov, Volga

     

     

  • Leipzig, Bessarabia

 

  • Liebenthal, Volga

 

 

  • Lillienfeld, North Caucasus

.

  • Louis, Samara, Volga

    2011 Village Report for Louis
     
    I will pledge this next year to have a better year as far as setting new goals for the projects I wish to complete for my Villages.  I have been working so hard to complete my book about my parents, I feel I have maybe neglected my villages somewhat, although I have continued publishing my quarterly Newsletter ( a goal of mine).  I do answer all inquiries as soon as I gather the information, and have kept on top of that Village Coordinator duty.

    During the year, I received - (and these are grouped with Louis, Russia) - approximately 119 inquiries. Several of these were requests to have their names added to my Newsletter list.  Eight of these were requests for information that actually needed to be referred to a different Village Coordinator, which I did.  I actually don't mind doing this, and feel we need to help everyone, but I always feel left out of the loop so to speak.  I never hear back to know if they found their information or not, and if I should help them further.  Only one VC kept me in the loop and that was Kevin Rupp. It was very good of him.

    Several of these requests for information were from other countries, and I actually feel that I am improving on my German and Spanish languages - another goal of mine.

    I am now planning on getting my information ready for the next convention.  I wanted to get to the SLC Convention so that I could see how the villages were portrayed.  I hope they continue to do this project, so I can show my villages.

    We (AHSHR) have had several new Village Coordinators and I want to welcome them, and remind them to ask for their Village packets from Headquarters in Lincoln, Nebraska.  Also, whenever the Journals and Clues are mailed out, you will find new members in those publications to add to your village lists.  For many years, I would forget to check these out.


    Thelma Mills
    Village Coordinator for Louis

     

     

  • Luzern,  Samara, Volga

  • Maienheim
    2011 Maienheim Village Report

     

     

    Maienheim was a "Daughter Colony" of Dehler.  It was formed on the Steppe about 50 kilometers directly east of Dehler in 1928 with movement of 150 Dehler villagers to Maienheim.  It is not to be confused with Mannheim, a Lutheran village north and west of it.  Maienheim deserves a dot on the AHSGR Volga German colony map.  Dr. Mattias Haagen PhD, a prominent guest speaker at an AHSGR Convention during the 1990s wrote about Maienheim in a German article published in Heimatsbuch.  He also included the map drawn by Professor Trausch from the collective memories of Dr. Haagen, and a third cousin named Klemmens Stoessel.  Andy Kroneberger saw the original map at the home of Professor Mattias Trausch in Germany during a visit nearly 10 years ago.  Mattias Trausch and Andy Kroneberger are first cousins.  Katharina Kroneberger, the mother of Professor Trausch, and Andreas Kroneberger, the father of Andy, are sister and brother.  It was Isdor Trausch the older brother of Professor Trausch who was able to arrange smuggling of Margaretha Stoessel, Andy's mother out of Dehler in 1927 when it was impossible for Volga Germans to get out of Russia.  Both Andy and Mattias Trausch also share direct line Haagen ancestry.

     

    By late 1941 Maienheim was evacuated and all of the residents stripped of their citizenship and sent to forced labor camps in Kazakhstan.  By the time that villagers from Maienheim were again allowed to travel with some of their rights restored after 1960, only a few remnants of buildings still existed upon their return to their homes.  The 2011 project for Maienheim will be to recreate a list of inhabitants of Maienheim or find a list of the 150 settlers that moved there in 1928.  We will also be trying to record the names of those that were exiled in 1941 and where they were sent.

     

    Valentina Masson was born 1936 in Maienheim, the daughter of Johannes Masson (born circa 1910 in Dehler) and Amalia Günther born 1913 in Dehler.  She now lives in Germany and has visited both the ancestral home in Dehler colony plus the remains of Mainenheim.  Valentina's ancestral roots also include the Beck, Martel, Maibach, and Schell families.

     

    If you have any information on the families that lived in Maienheim please contact me.  I am interested in obtaining a list of the settlers that went to Maienheim from Dehler in 1928 and making contact with their descendants.  I am a direct descendant from the Büchner, Führ, Kroneberger, and Stoessel families from Dehler and am related to many of the families that settled in Maienheim.

     

     

    Jim Osborne and Andy Kroneberger

    Village Coordinators for Maienheim

    15 January 2012

  • Marienbrunn, North Caucasus

 

  • Mariental, Samara, Volga

    2011 Village Report for Mariental
     
    I will pledge this next year to have a better year as far as setting new goals for the projects I wish to complete for my Villages.  I have been working so hard to complete my book about my parents, I feel I have maybe neglected my villages somewhat, although I have continued publishing my quarterly Newsletter ( a goal of mine).  I do answer all inquiries as soon as I gather the information, and have kept on top of that VC duty.

    During the year, I received - (and these are grouped with Louis, Russia) - approximately 119 inquiries. Several of these were requests to have their names added to my Newsletter list. Eight of these were requests for information that actually needed to be referred to a different Village Coordinator which I did.  I actually don't mind doing this, and feel we need to help everyone, but I always feel left out of the loop so to speak.  I never hear back to know if they found their information or not, and if I should help them further.   Only one VC kept me in the loop and that was Kevin Rupp.  It was very good of him.

    Several of these requests for information were from other countries, and I actually feel that I am improving on my German and Spanish languages - another goal of mine.

    I am now planning on getting my information ready for the next Convention - I wanted to get to the SLC Convention so that I could see how the villages were portrayed.  I hope they continue to do this project, so I can show my villages.

    We (AHSHR) have had several new Village Coordinators and I want to welcome them, and remind them to ask for their village packets from Headquarters in Lincoln, Nebraska.  Also, whenever the Journals and Clues are mailed out, you will find new members in those publications to add to your village lists.  I (for many years) would forget to check these out.

     

    Thelma Mills
    Village Coordinator for Mariental

     

  • Markosowka, North Caucasus

 

  • Messer, Saratov, Volga

    2011 Village Report for Messer

    I received eight inquiries for Messer.  The names being researched were Engels, Zeller, Meng, Lehr, Fischer, Gabels, Weigand and Rady.  I've inherited the Village Coordinator position from my father who passed away and have had difficulty retrieving his records.  I'm hoping to make a trip to Seattle to recover these sometime in 2012.  This will enable me to contribute in a more substantial manner.

    Debra Weigand-Robbins
    Village Coordinator for Messer

 

  • Molochna Colony Mennonite Villages

 

  • Moor, Saratov, Volga

    2011 Village Report for Moor
     

    2011 was a particularly busy year for the Moor group.

    In May, I gave a presentation at the California District Council (CDC) annual Heritage Fest in Sacramento. The talk this time concentrated on finding our Isenburg roots.

    August brought the Annual Convention in Salt Lake City.  The Utah chapter put on a super convention. For a small group they were incredible and an example to other larger chapters who think they are unable to host a convention.  Village Night at the convention saw a large group of Balzer/Moor researchers.   It was good to see familiar faces and meet new people.  Many found common ancestries through our discussions.

    Took advantage of the great LDS Family History Center while in Utah and was extremely successful in locating new ancestors in Germany, particularly some Kurpfalz families for the first time.  Access to two never used before websites gave me the clues to be successful in finding more Moor ancestral villages in Germany.

    With the invaluable aid of Herb Femling from the Portland Chapter, we have completed Volume 2 of our series of Volga German Settlers identified in Isenburg and Other German Church Records.  It is now in print and orders are now accepted.  I included about 200 new entries for ten Volga Colonies.  A list of the new families will be sent to Dick Kraus for entry into his German Origins website.  Kurpfalz names will be included in Volume 3 and hopefully available at the Portland convention next June.  There were many Moor additions to both volumes.

    I had a number of email requests throughout the year from here and abroad and was able to help many of them, but as with everyone else, I cannot be of much assistance for those who have yet to connect back to 1857 and earlier.  Unfortunately, two requests came from Russia and were written in Cyrillic and I was unable to decipher.

    Last of all, I am once again publishing a Balzer/Moor Newsletter.  I still am crazy with work and have had some medical issues since the convention, but so much new has come through, I have to report to our loyal group at least twice a year.

    Wayne Bonner
    Co-Coordinator Moor Colony


  • Mueller, Saratov, Volga

     

  • Mühlhausendorf, Swedish Colonies, Nikolaev and Kherson
     

     

  •  

  • Neu-Galka, Samara, Volga

    2011 Village Report for Neu Galka

    Surnames for Neu-Galka include Albrecht, Bauer, Beichel, Berg, Bernhardt, Borger, Brunner, Buchhammer, Dahlinger, Diehl, Dienes, Elsasser, Fischer, Frank, Fuchs, Hanschu, Haas, Hoffman, Geier, Jost, Kloss, Kandelin, Klass, Kock, Koerbs (Kerbs), Kretz, Langhofer, Lattner, Martin, Meier, Riffel, Ruff, Schwab, Schneider, Schantzebach, Schick, Schimpf, Schmidt, Schenk, Sinner, Simon, Steinbach, Stuertz, Veit, Wagner, Weimer, Weisheim, Wiesner, and Ziegler.  The source list of these village surnames was the 1857 Census from Brent Mai received in the early part of 2010.

    Neu-Galka was founded in 1860 by Lutheran colonists resettling from Galka and Dobrinka.  There were about 630 people who resettled in Neu Galka, with about 20 from Dobrinka and the remainder from Galka.  Surnames of people that moved to Neu-Galka were Riffel, Weimer, Hanschu, Langhofer, Wagner, Dahlinger, Brunner, Haas, Hoffman, Bernhardt, Schmidt, Dienes and Ruff.  After the deportation of 1941, the area occupied by the former village was absorbed into the nearby Russian town of Pallasovka and is today a neighborhood of Pallasovka.

    Villages in the Lower Volga region were given a fixed amount of land, as described in the history section.  Land was divided, and re-divided periodically, among the households and families in the village.  By the time the 1850's were reached, the amount of land for each family was so small that families could not grow enough crops to both use as food and sell for income.

    The solution was to found new villages, called daughter colonies, in parts of the Lower Volga region were no villages existed.  Most of these villages were on the east side of the Volga River

    With all of the startup activity in establishing a source of information on the villages, I have not been able to post to a standard website.


    Leland Riffel
    Village Coordinator for Frankreich, Neu-Galka, Strassburg, Neu-Weimar, Alt-Weimar, & Weimar Villages

     

     

     

  • Neudorf, Glückstal, Odessa, South Russia

 

  • Neu-Moor, Saratov, Volga

    2011 Village Report for Neu-Moor

    Neu-Moor (Russian name Pogranichny), was a "grand-daughter" colony, formed in the 1920's by people living in the "mother" colony of Moor.  It was located in the Balzer District on the Bergseite (west or hilly side) of the Volga River, and was approximately 30 - 40 miles from the "mother" colony of Moor.

    Very little information is available on Neu-Moor. I have had only one person seeking information on this colony, no one this past year.

    Irma A. Waggoner

    Village Coordinator for Neu-Moor

     

  • Neu-OberMonjou, Samara, Volga, Russia

     

  • Neu-Norka

    2011 Village Report for Neu-Norka

    2011 has been a rough year and I'm sure you can all relate.  After 5 funerals I'm hoping to get more time to work on getting the 65 Neu-Norka families in my data bank.  As you know one name will lead you to the wives, brothers, sisters, aunts, and uncles.  Nine times out of ten I find I'm related.

     

    I had five inquires and was able to answer all. One from Jaimie Huber, AHSGR Research Librarian, about a new member named Alexander Adam with ties to Neu-Norka which turned out to be a long lost first cousin 1x removed.  I was able to take him back to our 6th Great Grandfather Johannes Spady b/ 1712, in Afterroth, Austria and he was able to bring me up to date here in the USA.  Also from the same family, Gobel, which I have settled on, (also known as Ebel, Goebel, Gabel, Gebel), all connected, from Judith Weitzel Wilmink.  I'm still working on her request.

     

    I'm still waiting for my update from Dr. Pleve on the Schwartz side of the family, going on 14 years with no help.

     

    I hope you all have a good year and God bless all.

     

    Marvin L. Schwartz

    Village Coordinator for Neu-Norka

 

  • Neu-Schoenfeld

    2011 Village Report for Neu Schoenfeld

    Hello all,

    Neu Schoenfeld was a daughter colony of Schoenfeld, which was a daughter colony of Pobochnoye.  This colony was located about 90 miles SE of Saratov.  It was probably founded after 1860, very late, by villagers from Schoenfeld and other nearby villages.  It was probably Lutheran.  I do not have any listing of surnames for this village.

    I received one request from a person in Niszny Novgorad searching for family members.


    Laurin P. Wilhelm

    Village Coordinator for Neu Schoenfeld

     

  • Neu-Straub, Saratov, Volga

    2011 Village Report for Neu-Straub
     

    I have had no new information on my village, Neu-Straub this year.  I have helped several persons who found my name in the AHSGR files and contacted me.  One that really made me happy was a lady who thought she had relatives in Oklahoma and I found she was a first cousin to my second cousin.  I put them in touch with each other and they shared photos and information.  I have been able to connect several other persons in their research.

     

    As co-coordinator of Neu-Straub, I am always happy to research other names and villages but hope someday to find my great grandparents who lived in Russia, possibly in Neu-Straub.  My grandparents are Keil and Heintz and came from Neu-Straub.

    Lillian Larwig

    Co-Village Coordinator for Neu-Straub

     

  • Neu-Weimar, Samara, Volga

    2011 Village Report for Neu Weimar

    Surnames for Neu-Weimer include Abich, Bathauer, Bischoff, Brauer, Breyer, Brunner, Deisner, Diehl, Dieterle, Eichmann, Erbes, Ernst, Flath, Frank, Fritzler, Gerlach, Graff, Grohs, Hefele, Heinrich, Herbel, Kahl, Klauser, Kretz, Krispins, Lotz, Martin, Meier, Müller, Neuwirt, Nuss, Peil, Peter, Rau, Riel, Rusch, Schimpf, Schlotthauer, Schmidt, Schmunk, Schön, Seifert, Siebenlist, Siegfried, Simon, Taudt, Traudt, Utz, Vogel, Weber, Weimer, Wilhelm, Wolf, and Würtz.  The source list of these Village surnames was the 1857 Census from Brent Mai received in the early part of 2010.

    Neu-Weimar was founded in 1861 as a Lutheran colony by colonists who relocated to Neu-Weimar came from Galka, Stephan, Schwab and Dobrinka.

    Villages in the Lower Volga region were given a fixed amount of land, as described in the history section. Land was divided, and re-divided periodically, among the households and families in the village.  By the time the 1850's were reached, the amount of land for each family was so small that families could not grow enough crops to both use as food and sell for income.

    The solution was to found new villages, called daughter colonies, in parts of the Lower Volga region were no villages existed.  Most of these villages were on the east side of the Volga River.

    With all of the startup activity in establishing a source of information on the villages, I have not been able to post to a standard website.

    Leland Riffel
    Village Coordinator for Frankreich, Neu-Galka, Strassburg, Neu-Weimar, Alt-Weimar, & Weimar Villages

     

  • Neu-Yagodnaya, Samara, Volga

    2011 Village Report for Neu Yagodnaya

    Hello all,

    Neu Yagodnaya, aka Neu Yakoda, was located about 65 miles ESE of Saratov and was a daughter colony of Yagodnaya Polyana.  It was a Lutheran colony located on the upper Yeruslan River.

    There was no activity for this village this year.

    Laurin P. Wilhelm

    Village Coordinator for Neu Yagodnaya

     

  • Nieder-Monjou, Samara, Volga

    2011 Village Report for Nieder-Monjou
     

    During the past year we responded to queries concerning the following Nieder-Monjou surnames: ANSCHUETZ, BETZ, BISTERFELDT/BIESTERFELD, FUNK, HERBER, MORKEL and SARTORIUS/SATORIUS.  The queries came from Russia, Germany, and the U.S.

    We continue to add the Nieder-Monjou households from the 1850 and 1857 revision lists to our data base as time permits.  Unfortunately the 1834 revision list for Nieder-Monjou was not filmed.

    Michael Grau and Steven Grau

    Village Coordinators for Nieder-Monjou

     

     

  • Norka
    2011 Village Report for Norka

    Four of us are actively involved in areas that assist Norka descendants in learning more about our ancestors who left Germany and established Norka as their home, including what life was like for the multiple generations who lived in Norka, reasons why our ancestors left Norka, plus information on the history and events affecting those who remained in Norka after 1910.  Since 1990, a number of individuals and groups have been able to visit Norka and have shared information, stories and pictures. Additionally, some have traveled to Germany to visit their family’s homeland villages, towns and areas and some have met with family members currently residing in Germany and they have also shared information, stories and pictures.   We encourage you to become aware of what is available to you and to contact us with questions, suggestions, and contributions of your family.

    The following information is provided by:

    Steve Schreiber - Norka Webmaster and Norka Film Coordinator
    6806 S.E. 35th Avenue  -  Portland, OR 97202
    steven.schreiber@gmail.com

    Norka Website:  http://www.volgagermans.net/norka/

    New information was added to the Norka website during 2011. The new additions include:

    A tabular summary of Population Statistics from 1767 to 1941 showing the number of males and females in the colony over the founding of the colony until the deportation in 1941.

    A translation from "Geschichte der Reformirten Kirche in Russland" by Hermann Dalton (Gotha: Rudolf Besser Verlag, 1865). This extract pertains directly to the parish of Norka but includes information on other Volga German Reformed congregations. The translation was prepared by Bill Pickelhaupt in July 2011.

    A 1909 history of the Evangelical-Lutheran Church in Russia. This was an update to a church history from 1867 by G. H. Busch. This document was extracted from the portion of the 1909 book dealing with the Volga Bergseite (hilly side) in which the colony of Norka was located. The document was translated by Bill Pickelhaupt.

    The First Christmas in Norka, Russia - a story of the lives of Johann Wilhelm Schreiber and his wife Anna Eva (her maiden name was Moritz) who were celebrating Christmas for the first time in Norka, Russia in 1767. More than a year earlier, they had decided to leave their home in Hessen for what they hoped would be a better life in a new land.

    Many famine letters written in the 1920s and 1930s were added to the site. The letters were published in Die Welt Post, a German language newspaper published in the United States. The letters graphically tell the story of the severe famines in Russia during these time periods and have been translated to the English language by Hugh Lichtenwald.

    A page about Norka goods that were exhibited at the 1862 International Exhibition in London was added. The exhibitors were J. Deines and W. Spadi.

    New satellite photos of Norka (Russian name = Nekrasovo) from Google have been linked to the website.

    An extract from a "History of the Volga German Colonists" by Jacob Dietz, describing the Russian bandit Emelian Pugachev’s march through Norka in 1774.

    A description of the 1927 film taken in Russia by Heinrich Wacker (Henry Walker) was added to the site. Many of the scenes were taken in Norka. The plan is to complete the documentary on this film in 2012 and it will be available on DVD through AHSGR.

    A Facebook page for Norka was created in December 2011. This page will complement the Norka Newsletter and Norka website as a community gathering place where people interested in Norka can connect and find answers to their questions.

    The Following Information is Provided by: 

    Judy Curtis - Norka Database Coordinator – Norka Project CD
    9026 S. Dateland Dr. - Tempe, AZ, 85284
    tnjcurtis@aol.com

    The Norka Database continued to grow in 2011 and contains over 29,000 individuals who have been entered into PAF (Personal Ancestral File – a computer genealogy program), created as a research tool for Norka descendants to assist them in finding their family members who lived in Norka.  The database is a merged collection of Norka Pleve surname charts along with the “connecting links” of information on generations of Norka descendants who extend forward from where both the Norka census records and Norka Pleve surname charts end. 

    After starting the work on compiling the Norka database back in 2003, it was determined that a more inclusive way of assisting Norka descendants would be to combine more of the information being shared with me under the umbrella of the Norka Project.   Norka Project items are stored on the Norka CD which is updated annually to coincide with the annual AHSGR convention.  These items have been collected and added to the Norka CD for the benefit of all Norka descendants, especially those not having a computer or access to the internet.  The Norka CD is not freely distributed or available to purchase; it is only available at AHSGR headquarters in Lincoln, NE and at the several AHSGR chapters (Portland, OR; Denver, CO and Fresno, CA) large enough to have computers available for researchers to use.  If distance prevents you from going to one of the these AHSGR chapter libraries, you can request information regarding your Norka ancestral family members by contacting Judy Curtis for look-ups in the Norka database and for copies of Norka 2011 convention handouts, or to Louis Schleuger, Norka Census Records Coordinator, for look-ups and assistance in Norka census records. 

    The Norka Project 2011 CD includes a wide variety of items including the following:

    The Norka Database (searchable database of 29,445 individuals)

    The Norka Census Records 1767 through 1857 (each a searchable database – see more information below)

    Norka Census Cross Reference (Excel document) for 1767-1857

    Articles of interest pertaining to German and Russian history at the time Norka ancestors were living there. Various ports in America where our GR ancestors arrived.

    Maps of Germany, Russia and America useful in tracking GR history. 

    Pictures of Norka and other nearby Volga villages, villages/towns of Germany where GRs gathered before leaving for Russia, and some pictures of both Germany (towns, cities and areas where Norka ancestors emigrated from) and Russia (in or near Norka) taken in the last 20 years. 

    The German Origins Project, available on the AHSGR website, has entries for Norka that have been consolidated into Word documents that are updated each year on the Norka CD. 

    The Center for Volga German Studies at Concordia University (Portland, OR) website:  http://cvgs.cu-portland.edu/colonies/russia/mother_colonies/colony_norka.html.   Norka articles, reports, updates, etc. are available in Word documents on the Norka CD. 

    Family folders that contain articles, stories, family histories, pictures, copies of family documents of all types, and other family treasures---whatever Norka descendants have provided to share with others as well as having a place to preserve the contents of these family folders. 

    Family histories and stories preserved on the Norka CD as a Word document, many that also appear on the Norka website:  http://www.volgagermans.net/norka/norka_stories.html

    Norka 2011 Convention Handouts: 

               AHSGR Norka 2011 – Village Inventory

               AHSGR Norka  2011 – Surname Charts on Website

               Norka  2011 Surnames – Preferred Spelling and Variations

               Norka 2011 – What’s Available for Researchers

               Norka 2011CD – Listing of Folders, Articles and Databases

    If anyone has items to add to the Norka CD, please send copies (you keep the originals) either electronically as an attachment to an e-mail to Judy Curtis at tnjcurtis@aol.com or by snail mail to Judy Curtis, 9026 S. Dateland Dr., Tempe, AZ 85284.  Remember, this is a way to share with others as well as to preserve what you have.

    The following information is provided by:

    Louis Schleuger - Norka Census Records Coordinator 
    P. O. Box 773 - Lobeco, SC 29931
    chibi12@charter.net

    Based on comparing Norka’s censuses information and the various Norka family surname charts researched by Dr. Igor Pleve listed in the Norka Database, errors were noted on Dr. Pleve’s charts and within the censuses which resulted in many corrections and linkages of family members and updated notes were made to Norka’s censuses databases.

    The cross referencing all of the families listed in Norka’s 1767-1857 censuses is progressing slowly, but well.  In this cross referencing effort, errors were noted on Dr. Pleve’s charts listed in the Norka Database and within the censuses concerning family members’ marriages, number of children and their linkages with other families.  Part of the linkage effort includes the linage of females when they married since Dr. Pleve did not include that linage on his charts. 

    The research by many other Norka descendants is being included in this effort, which results in a much more complete family chart from 1767 to the current year.  For example, research conducted by Donna McCoy on the Hinkel family and research by the Norka Project members of the Norka Database and Norka’s censuses resulted in linking many of the Hinkels’ and in establishing a Hinkel database with 1,433 individuals (still a work in progress).  Also, based on a current request by a member of the Urbach family, research is in progress by the Norka Project members of the Norka Database and Norka’s censuses to compile an Urbach family lineage (so far 733 names entered into an Urbach database).

    All available Norka census records have been entered into PAF (Personal Ancestral File), each as an independent researchable computer database research tool.  Additionally, the Cross Reference (Excel document) includes all of the Norka individual family members listed in the Norka 1767-1857 census records as explained above:  

    Norka 1767 Original Settler’s List (searchable database of 833 individuals  -  279 marriages)

    Norka 1775 Census Record (searchable database of 1,091 individuals – 301 marriages)

    Norka 1798 Census Record (searchable database of 2,297 individuals – 666 marriages)

    Norka 1811 Census Record (searchable database of 1,464 individuals (males only)

    Norka 1834 Census Record (searchable database of 4,848 individuals – 1,275 marriages)

    Norka 1857 Census Record (searchable database of 7,443 individuals – 1,950 marriages)

    Norka Census Cross Reference (Excel doc.) for 1767-1857

    The following information is provided by:

    Jerry Krieger - Norka Newsletter Editor
    652 8th Street N.E.  -  Mason City, IA 50401
    norkanews@gmail.com

    2011 marks the end of the sixteenth year of the publication of the Norka Newsletter. The newsletter was begun in 1996 by John and Marcella Wark of Menlo Park, California.  Late in 1997, the Warks regretfully announced that they would be unable to continue the work. I contacted the Warks about taking on the responsibility of publishing the newsletter. Thanks to their help and encouragement we were able to continue the Norka Newsletter without serious interruption.

    The Norka Newsletter is a quarterly publication, and goes in the mail in February, May, August and November. Each issue of the 8-page publication includes articles on life in Norka, genealogical data, and the stories of men, women, and families who left Russia, crossed the Atlantic, and built a new life in North and South America and Canada. For a sample copy of the Norka Newsletter, contact me at norkanews@gmail.com.


    Submitted by Judy Curtis
    Norka Database Coordinator

     

  • North Caucasus

     
  • 2011 Village Report for Oberdorf

    My name is Harold Sigward and I am the new village coordinator for Oberdorf and have had the position now for two months.  I have received the village inventory information from Lincoln and as yet I have not received any village inquires.   I am looking forward to what the new year brings.

    Harold Sigward

    Village Coordinator for Oberdorf

     

  • Ober-Monjou, Samara, Volga

    2011 Village Report for Obermunjou
     

    Although I have a number of villages for which I work, this village has the greatest passion for me since 75% of my family came from this village.  This year has been a bit slow but I probably receive e-mail at least twice a month from people who are interested in this village either from Germany, South America or here in the States.

    I continue to work on my main website, www.volgagerman.net as well as maintain a number of various village websites included my Obermunjou site, www.volgagerman.net/Obermunjou.htm.  New items are posted on this site as I am able to receive them from various archives or connections.

    Over the past couple of years I have been in contact with several families who have sent me copies of their genealogies which have bridged some gaps.  These "Familienchronik" book have included Hertel, Fischer and Krapp.  I did receive a Giebler chart from a very distant family member from Germany that was very interesting.  Many people still are willing to exchange photos and information whenever it is possible.

    Resources available at this time include:

    1.  Kulberg Lists

    2.  First Settlers Lists

    3.  1834 Census (Not complete but still working on it)

    4.  1850 Census

    5.  1857 Census

    6.  Birth Records, although not complete) for the years: 1821-1918

    7.  Marriage Records for the years: 1839, 1840, 1850-1858, 1860-1864, 1875, 1876-1911

    8.  Death Records for the years: 1850-1855, 1856-1876, 1890-1906, 1907-1918

    I would say my greatest wish would be to get any village Family lists from 1874 - 1880 if they are available.  So far none have shown up.

    Kevin Rupp
    Village Coordinator for Obermunjou

     

     

  • Odessa, Odessa, South Russia

     

     
  • Old Swedish Villages

     

  • Orlovskoye, Samara, Volga

 

  •  2011 Village Report for Paulskoye
     

    Unfortunately no new inquiries were received this year.

    Translated copies of the Paulskoye census for 1850 and 1857 were completed and made available for purchase by Dr. Brent Mai---who has my utmost appreciation!!!  Their availability was made known to other Paulskoye researchers via email by me.

    Recently I have added quite a few previously unknown individuals to my Dr. Pleve-prepared WEDE family chart thanks to the 1850 census for Krasnoyar also made available by Mai.  Years ago Pleve had noted a particular WEDE family member from Paulskoye had married and moved to Krasnoyar in 1790, but couldn't find them in archival records beyond 1796.  Pleve informed me he believed the family must have died out.  The truth is there were numerous descendants, including at least six sons born 1798-1814, per the 1850 Krasnoyar census.  It helps to explain why, in 1996, when I visited the former
    German villages, I met a WEDE descendant who insisted his ancestors were from Krasnoyar, not Paulskoye. This Krasnoyar WEDE branch does, however, connect to the Paulskoye WEDE family. I guess a genealogist’s work truly is never done!

    Respectfully submitted,


    Tim Weeder

    Village Coordinator for Stahl am Tarlyk

     

     

     

     

  • Pfeifer, Saratov, Volga

    2011 Village Report for Pfeifer (Gniluschka)

    Requests were received for the surnames Herr, Lambrecht, Jacobs, Etzel, Breit/Pfeifer, Seib/Engel, Eckermann and Hafner.

    The ORIGINS of the first settlers of Pfeifer are found at this AHSGR
    website: http://www.ahsgr.org/FindAncestors/german_origins.htm.

    The 1798 Pfeifer census as well as the first settler lists are available from AHSGR.

    The 1850 Pfeifer revision list [census] is available from me.  The 1850 census lists the surnames of the spouses as well as the heads of household.  The Pfeifer 1834 and 1857 censuses are available from Kevin Rupp, krupp@ruraltel.net.

    The Pfeifer database surnames have been checked in the Kuhlberg book as well as the Transport List. I have found an ancestor through the name that was listed in the Transport List since it is an uncommon first name--Sybilla.  One never knows what will be the clue to that elusive ancestor.

    Rosemary [Wiesner] Larson

    Village Coordinator for Pfeifer

     

 

  • Pobochnoye, Saratov, Volga

    2011 Village Report for Pobochnoye

    Hello all,

    Pobochnoye was probably the last of the "Mother Colonies" to be founded.   It was started in 1773 by a group of 29 families from Darmstadt, Germany, of the Reformed (Calvinist) faith).  This was about four or five years after immigration into Russia was closed.  It was located about 40 miles NW of Saratov. The German village by the name of Nebenseite (Beside, Stepchild, Illegitimate) fell into disuse.

    There has not been much activity this year.  I have corresponded with several descendent families, now living in Germany.


    Laurin P. Wilhelm

    Village Coordinator for Pobochnoye

     

     

  • Polish Volhynia
     2011 Village Report for Polish Volhynia

    There were no inquiries received in 2011 for Polish Volhynia. The new book "Die Deutsche Frage im Schwarzmeergebiet und in Wolhynien" (The German Question in the Black Sea and in Volhynia) by Dietmar Neutatz will be available in 2012 in the AHSGR bookstore.  "Legends of the Germans in Volhynia and Polesye" is currently available in the bookstore.

    During the Salt Lake City Convention in August 2011 I coordinated the Village Area 8 Volhynia group. One of the members spoke about their trip to Poland, and showed pictures of their ancestral village. A beginning Volhynian researcher was very interested in information contained in the Heritage Hall binder.  Earlier in the year, I reorganized and updated the information in that binder.

    As two Village Coordinators were not able to attend the Convention in Salt Lake, I also coordinated the large group in Village Area 12 Bessarabia and the smaller group in Village Area 10 Caucasus.  In the larger group I was able to help beginners with their research. The more advanced researchers shared with each other.

    With input from Leona Janke, I prepared an article and located a map online of Volhynia for the Central California Chapter Newsletter.  It appeared in the June 2011 issue on pages 6 and 7.

    In August I attended the Society for German Genealogy in Eastern Europe (SGGEE) annual convention in Winnipeg, MB Canada as a way to network with other Volhynian researchers.

    Following are surnames in the Polish Volhynian and Volhynian database:  Adam, Arndt, Behnke, Berezowski, Benz, Berg, Bieberdorf, Buller(s), Borchert, Busse, Cantor, Chepel, Daher, Dause, Domrose, Drews, Fetter, Fitzer, Gertz, Goering, Gramm, Hartwig, Hepp, Hiller, Hintz, Hinz, Janke, Jantz, Jenke, Jenz, Joseph, Kapro(w)sky, Katha, Kathke, Katke, Koestel-Otto, Kolenosky(Kalinowsky), Kopp, Krentz, Krueger, Kunkel, Loewen, Lucas, Lutz, Marks, Matz, Morganstern, Muhlbeier, Muehlbeier, Neufeld, Neumann, Nickel, Nikkel, Olufka, Olsufka, Olszowka, Patzer, Pfenning, Plieske, Plines, Plischke, Rappauhn, Rast, Ratz, Retzlaff, Rosen, Schmidt, Schroeder, Schultz, Schwanke, Schwandtke, Schwark, Schwarz, Sempf, Sieberts, Ulm, Weick, Wedman, Weidermann, Wendler, Woitt, Zedelmayer, Zietz, and Zuch.

    New surnames added in 2011: Bendzulla, Boese, Gaiewski, Kersten, Schmidt, Schwittay, Unruh.

    Mabel Kiessling
    Village Coordinator for Polish Volhynia

     

  • Pruess

    2011 Village Report for Preuss

     

    I am pleased to present the first AHSGR Village Coordinator's report for Preuss colony.  Preuss is on the east side of the Volga in a cluster with two other Catholic villages, Hölzel and Seelmann, south of Brabander and Dehler.  I share the village coordinator position with two dedicated Volga German genealogists from Bahia Blanca, Buenos Aires, Argentina, Cristian Jungblut and his wife Eliana Prost who have volunteered to help in our common efforts to establish roots and obtain the census and church documents of our ancestors.  Cristian Jungblut and Eliana Prost both have ancestry from Dehler, Preuss, and Hölzel.  They have published one book on the early colony of San Miguel the Archangel.  Cristian has a Volga German radio program in Bahia Blanca.  Eliana and Cristian both speak fluent German and are competent genealogists.

     

    It was a very good year for Preuss colony research. When we ask to serve as Village Coordinator's for Preuss we already had an edge. We had the 1767, 1798, and 1834 village census.  In early December I recieved copies of the 1850 and 1857 Preuss census translations  recently translated by Professor Brent Mai.  I also have the 1850 and 1857 Preuss census in the original Russian version.

     

    Preuss surnames in the 1857 village census index include Ahlerborn, Allendorf, Aman, Balle, Basgal, Bauer, Becker, Beitch, Bender, Berger, Bessler, Bickhart, Böhm/Behm, Bondang (Bondank), Borger, Braun, Breder, Breitenstein, Brendel, Brineau, Busch, Butbolowski, Christian, Chuvale  (this may be yet another spelling of Chevalier, Schwalje, Schwalier a French name from Brabander colony), Dandorfer, Decker, Degel, Degenhardt, Denk, Dietrich, Diwiwie, Domme  (Thomä), Dries   (the Dries family were original settlers in Seewald colony), Dukart, Dulson, Dummerauf (the Dummerauf/Tumerauf family were original settlers in Holzel colony with a female line marrying into the Bartel family from Brabander), Durban, Eberling, Erle, Fenzel, Fleur, Frank, Fritz, Fuchs, Führ  (the Führ family has origins in Rothammel colony with two branches in Dehler and one branch in Brabander, all descending from Christian Führ from the first settler list of Rothammel), Gall, Gedde, Graf  (the Graf family also has a strong presence in Brabander colony), Grasser, Gregor, Grünewaldt, Haag (this family is probably a branch of the Haag/Haagen family from Holzel that also had two brothers migrate very early to Dehler colony), Handel, Heidelmann, Heidt, Heiland, Heilmann, Heim, Herbstsommer (the Herbstsommer family is also in Holzel and Brabander with early migration to Argentina), Hirschfeld, Hofsetzer, Holzmann, Jungblut  (this is the family of village coordinator Cristian Jungblut from Bahia Blanca Argentina), Karpf, Keiner, Kern, Kessler, Kiese, Klamm, Klock, Knopf, Kroneberger (this is the Kroneberger family from Dehler colony), Kreis, Kreismann, Kretch, Kreter (probably Krotter from Dehler colony), Krug, Kunz, Lang, Lauchner, Lindner, Lorenz, Molleker (from Brabander colony), Manaus, Mannes, Martel (this is the Martel family from Dehler and Brabander), Masson (this is the Masson family from Dehler and Brabander), Matz, Maus, Mehringer (this is the Meringer family from Brabander), Meier, Melchor, Miltenberger, Minor (this Minor family also has a branch in Dehler), Müller, Neu, Neubauer  (this family is also in Brabander), Neufert, Neumann, Nick, Nieser, Oboldt, Östertag  (from Seewald, Volmer, and Dehler), Philipp, Prediger, Prol, Puhl (original settlers in Seewald colony), Ramberg, Rau, Rebel (I believe that this Rebel family is probably also Redel), Redel (this family has a Brabander branch which is in my direct lineage), Resch, Richert, Riel, Rollheiser, Roppeldt (this is another spelling variation of the Ruppel/Ruppelt family which also has a branch in Dehler colony), Rundau (the Rundau family had early migration to Argentina with marriages to the Stoessel family), Safenreiter, Scharf, Schell (this Schell family has origins in Seewald with a branch from Dehler colony), Schellhorn, Schenk, Schiebelbein (the Schiebelbein family also migrated to Argentina very early and had marriages to the Kern family from Brabander and Masson family from Dehler and Brabander), Schiebelhut, Schildt, Schmidt, Schneider, Schneiderjung, Schön, Schonfeld, Schreiter, Schropfer, Schuld, Schwartz, Schweichert, Schwemmler, Seelmann, Sennlein, Sewald, Siebe, Specht, Stamlpwotz, Staudecker  (Stalldecker), Steinbach, Stork (this family has Rothammel origins and and a Brabander branch which is in my direct lineage), Strack, Striwinski, Tremant, Tusch, Ulmann, Useldinger, Vogel, Wagner, Wamhold, Weber, Weingardt, Weisel, Weiss, Wendler, Werner, Wett (the Wett family also has a Brabander branch that is in my direct lineage), Wesner, Wildt, Wolf, Zeilmann, Zegler, Ziegmann (the Ziegmann family has a Brabander Branch that is in my direct lineage.), and Zimmermann.

                             

    Jim Osborne

    Village Coordinator for Preuss

    15 April 2012

  • Reinhard(t), Samara, Volga

 

  • Reinwald, Samara, Volga

     

     

     

  • Rohleder, Samara, Volga

     

  • Rohrbach, Berezan, Odessa, Kherson

     

     

  • Rosenberg / Umet, Saratov, Volga

     2011 Village Report for Rosenberg

    Rosenberg, known in Russian as Umet, was colonised from 1850 although a settlement had existed there from the 1820s. As a result of its late foundation there tends to be fewer enquiries than for some of the bigger and older villages. The census data from 1857 is the last available information which lists all settlers and there are very few birth marriage and death records available - most of these from the decade around the turn of the century and not presently available to the coordinator.  Unfortunately this means that few families can make the generational jump from individuals born after 1857 who would become the parents of those who emigrated to the Americas.

    This year has seen a total of eleven enquiries of which three were returning enquirers who had been in communication in previous years.  The families of these searchers were as follows: Weitzel, Dahlinger, and Ramig/Meier.  Two new enquiries were received with photographs dating to the early years of the 20th century:  a photograph of Heinrich Kuxhausen from a researcher based in Germany and two photos of the Dahlinger/Stricker family from a searcher in Russia. The remaining six enquirers asked about the following families: Manweiler/Seib; Knaub, Horst, Major, Meier, Herdt, Hilderman and Weber (researcher in Germany); Weber (from a recently volunteered village coordinator); Schiebelhut; Armbruster; Schwartkopf.

    If the surname is distinct enough it is possible to suggest the likely earlier ancestor from the census list but where a surname is more common it is often difficult to suggest which family group is the right one since the early settlers came from different villages and there is no evidence of connection with families bearing the same surname.

    The village website remains online at www.rosenbergvillage.org/Default.htm.

     

    Richard McGregor

    Village Coordinator for Rosenberg

     

     

     

  • Rosenfeld, North Caucasus

 

  • Rosenheim, Samara, Volga

    2011 Village Report for Rosenheim
     
    Over the last year there has only been a few inquiries about Rosenheim.  I do have a fairly large database of previous inhabitants and was able to help most of the people.  This year I hope to be a bit more active with the town and would like to get a Facebook page going to make it easier for people to find information.  I should have much more time as I am going to graduate from College today, December  16, 2011.


    As I was growing up, my grandpa spoke about Rosenheim where he was born.  The stories were interesting, but what really got me involved as a young person was the music, language, and cooking. This involvement at a young age gave me an awareness of the past and encourages me to carry our history to the next generation.  Now more than ever, we are able to digitize, document, and organize all of the hard work that has been done by hand.  I would also like for all of us to keep encouraging young people to become involved with this great organization, and ask them to help us use Social Media to bring our culture and history the forefront.

    Best wishes to you in the New Year,

    Duane Funk
    Village Coordinator for Rosenheim

 

  • Rothammel, Saratov, Volga

    2011 Village Report for Rothammel

    For the most part, many of the records from the middle 1800's to the early 1900's have been translated and incorporated into spreadsheets.  With the help of more than 100 people on the Rothammel / Seewald net-serve, we can track almost everyone back to the original settlers.  We received 25-30 requests for information and collected several dozen obituaries.

    Many have been helpful with donations for interpretation assistance and getting records. Recently, there has been some information coming from South America, with much potential to add to our database.  We have about 30,000 names fairly well documented with quite a few names to verify and
    add.

    At the convention, we had a few newer members attend, where significant information was shared.  Of significance was the increasing knowledge that more and more of the surrounding villages share some common ancestors from Seewald and Rothammel.  We are working on collecting additional data from
    some of these villages.

    We appreciate having Dr. and Rosi Kloberdancz adding the "stories", perspective and historical background, AHSGR for guidance and support and Nick and Barbara Bretz for our village management and leadership.

    We are looking forward to being added to a web-page and attending the Convention for 2012.

    Joe Gertge for Nick and Barbara Bretz
    Assistant Village Coordinator for Rothammel and Seewald

  • Schaffhausen, Samara, Volga
    2011 Village Report for Schaffhausen

    The only enquiries handled during 2011 involved longstanding researchers with an interest in Schaffhausen.  As such I continue to be concerned about the lack of enquiries regarding this village. Hopefully my planned attendance at the 2012 convention can stimulate interest among the
    descendants of Schaffhausen colonists.

    I have created a tentative Schaffhausen First Settlers List (FSL) derived from various sources including liaison with other Village Coordinators.  An official FSL does not, to my knowledge, exist.

    I have been very fortunate in being able to identify relatives still residing in Russia and extend my thanks to Tanja SCHELL for her assistance in this and other matters.

    I have continued to research Volga Germans who resided in China as part of the White Russian Diaspora and hope to be able to deliver a paper on this topic at the 2012 convention.

    I would welcome any information on Volga Germans who lived in China after the Russian Revolution.

    Regards,
    Jim Parsonage
    Village Coordinator for Schaffhausen
    Brisbane, AUSTRALIA

     

     

     

     
  • Schilling, Samara, Volga

    2011 Village Report for Schilling Villages

    The Schilling villages, for which I am the village coordinator, consist of Schilling (Alt-Schilling, the original village), Konstantinovka, Schilling in Samara Province adjacent to Konstantinovka, Neu-Schilling I and
    Neu-Schilling II in Samara Province, south of Krazny-Kut.

    During 2011, I received over 25 inquiries regarding people from the village of Schilling (Sosnovka), and its daughter colonies.  Information on current status of Schilling can be found in a 1994 trip report by Jene Goldhammer, which is online at: http://www.schillinggr.org/today.htm

    I continue to maintain a Schilling website, including its daughter colonies, at: http://www.schillinggr.org/.

    Church records for Schilling consisting of Birth & Christening books: 1764-1841, 1842-1878, Register of the Lutheran congregation: 1865-1931, and a Family list (similar to census): 1883 are at the Russian Archives in Engels. The archives in Engels does not sell copies of the original records, but will create reports (in Russian) using information from these records. Records for the daughter colonies of Konstantinovka and Neu-Schilling in Samara Province are at the Russian Archives in Saratov, and
    cover approximately the years 1860 to 1915.  During 2011, two Schilling researchers had reports created for the surnames of Filbert and Kaufmann, and the reports cost in the range of $1500.

    I continue to expand the Schilling database with information from all of the Schilling villages, using information purchased from the Russian Archives and with information about those who immigrated to Canada, the United States, Mexico, Argentina and Brazil.

    In the past year I have also offered and sold Descendant Box Charts for all descendants of people who immigrated to Schilling, or branches of those families. The charts are generated using my Schilling database and The Master Genealogist program.  Anyone interested can purchase charts for
    people/surnames from Schilling by contacting me.

    Gary Martens
    Village coordinator for Schilling villages (except Alexandertal)

 

  • Schilling, Saratov, Volga

    2011 Village Report for Alt-Schilling, Konstantinovka, Schilling, Neu-Schilling I and Neu-Schilling II

     During 2011 I received about thirty inquiries for the original Schilling village and its daughter colonies, except Alexandertal.

    I continue to maintain the website for Schilling at: http://www.schillinggr.org/.  There is also a Rootsweb mailing list for Schilling, with instruction for subscribing at:
    http://lists.rootsweb.ancestry.com/index/intl/RUS/RUS-SARATOV-SCHILLING.html.

    I continue to look for information on the first settlers at Alt-Schilling.  They are not included as extras in the first settler books by Dr. Pleve titled Einwanderung in das Wolgagebiet 1764-1767.  I will be looking in the book "The Kuhlberg Lists" by Dr. Pleve.  Some information on original settlers can be found at http://schillinggr.org/schilling_org.html.  A brief summary of information concerning Schilling daughter colonies can be found at http://schillinggr.org/schillings.html.


    Church records for Alt-Schilling are at the Russian Archives in Engels, and during the year the director of the Archives confirmed what records they have for the original village:  birth & christening books 1764-1878, register of the Lutheran congregation 1865-1931, and a family list (similar to census) for 1883. The Archives in Engels does not sell copies of the original records. They will create reports (in Russian), depending on your search criteria.  Schilling researchers have provided me with reports obtained for
    several surnames.  A small report containing about thirty names covering the 1860-1885 time period costs about $400, and a complete report for a surname with many names, covering the 1850-1920 period will cost between $1000 and $1500. There are some additional records for Schilling at the Russian Archives in Saratov.

    Church records for Konstantinovka, which probably includes the adjacent daughter colony of Schilling are at the Russian Archives in Saratov, and cover approximately 1860 to 1915.  Records for Neu-Schilling I and the nearby village of Neu-Schilling II are also at the archives in Saratov, and cover approximately 1860 to 1915. Exact information on what records are available is not known because in December 2011 the Russian Archives in Saratov first told me it would take 7 months to do a search of the records, then informed me that they are now charging approximately $25 to do a search, and payment must be made directly to their Russian bank account, which can only be done by someone in Russia.

    During the year several Schilling researchers received reports on people living in Alt-Schilling, Konstantinovka, Neu-Schilling I and Neu-Schilling II.  One report was commissioned through Dr. Pleve and included computer generated charts and a printed report.  The reports were generated by the
    archives in Saratov and Engels, and the charts were not the traditional hand drawn charts from the Pleve's.

    Pictures of Alt-Schilling in 1994, and an accompanying trip report can be found at: http://schillinggr.org/today.htm

    Gary Martens

    Village Coordinator for Alt-Schilling, Konstantinovka, Schilling, Neu-Schilling I
    and Neu-Schilling II

 

  • Schlangendorf, Swedish Colonies, Nikolaev and Kherson

     

  • Schönchen, Samara, Volga
    2011 Village Report for Schönchen
     
    We've had several inquiries this past year regarding the surnames Fladung, Werth, Herklotz, Ebel, Schnurr, Depperschmidt, Schoenthaler, Stark, and Wassinger.  The German origins of the Wasinger family (who originally settled in Graf, but some had moved to Schoenchen by the 1798 census) was documented and the information provided to the AHSGR German Origins project.  We've continued to add to our database.

    Terri Dann and Denise Grau
    Co-Village Coordinators for Schönchen

     

     

  • Schöndorf, Samara, Volga

    2011 Village Report for Schoendorf

    Hello all,

    Schoendorf (Pretty Village) was founded in 1855 by villagers from Yagodnaya Polyana (60%) and Pobochnoye (40%).  It is considered to be a daughter colony of Yagodnaya Polyana.  The people were mostly of the Lutheran faith. The village was located on the upper Yeruslan River.

    There was little activity, but I did correspond with some descendents in Colorado and Wyoming.  I also corresponded with a man in Nuerenberg, Germany who was born in Schoendorf in 1926. He was deported to Siberia in 1941 and worked in the coal mines for 50 years.


    Laurin P. Wilhelm

    Village Coordinator for Schoendorf

     

  • Schönfeld, Samara, Volga

    2011 Village Report for Schoenfeld

    Hello all,


    Schoenfeld(t) was the daughter colony of Pobochnoye.  It was founded in 1856, about 60 miles ESE of Saratov on the upper Yeruslan River.  The people were mostly Reformed (Calvinist), but Reformed pastors became hard to find and people were changing over to the Lutheran faith by c. 1880.

    There has been quite a bit of activity with the Schoenfeld researchers this year.  An Ochs descendent from Kazakhstan, now living in Hamburg, Germany made a family crest, which he shared with several Ochs family members in the U.S.

    Laurin P. Wilhelm

    Village Coordinator for Schoenfeld

     

  • Schöntal, Samara, Volga

    2011 Village Report for Schoental

    Hello all,

    Schoental was located about 65 miles ESE of Saratov and was the daughter colony of Yagodnaya Polyana.  It was founded in 1856 and was a Lutheran colony located on the upper Yeruslan river.

    There was no activity this year for this village.

    Laurin P. Wilhelm

    Village Coordinator for Schoental

     

  • Schuck, Saratov, Volga
     

     

  • Schulz, Samara, Volga

 
  • Schwab, Saratov, Volga

    2011 Village Report for Schwab

    My last queries from people, other than Gary Martens, were in October and November 2010.  Otherwise there has been no activity.

    I continue to post obits for SOAR.

    Enjoy the holiday season.  We will spend it recovering from my husband's knee replacement Monday Dec  5th.  This follows back surgery in July 2011. It appears a quiet year has probably been good for this household, but "bad" for Schwab family history.

    Rolene Kiesling
    Village Coordinator for Schwab

     

  • Schwed, Samara, Volga

    2011 Village Report for Schwed


    I received inquiries for the surnames Wiegel, Reimer, and Hoppe.  The inquiries were mostly concerning "How are we related?".


    I find it interesting that so many Germans from Russia lived in the Jefferson Park area of Chicago, were from Schwed, but didn't know how they were related to other families.   All "cousin" inquiries I have had are related to the first Wiegel in Schwed.  He had many children.  As one Schweder said, “If you are from Schwed, we are all cousins”.

    The 1798, 1850, 1857 census records are available for Schwed.  Surname charts are available for Altergott, Degraf, Gorr, Hoppe, Kuhfeld / Kufeldt, Pfeifer, and Wiegel.

    I have not been very active in the last couple of years.  I’m mainly in maintaining mode but hope to be able to spend more time in the coming years.  I want to re-establish the Schwed web page, and become active in at least one social media site.

    My own goal for 2012 is to determine where the Wiegel family came from in Germany.  Pleve was not able to provide this information.  I have a clue from the Stumpp book, and I will be checking LDS German church records.

    Keith Wiegel
    Village Coordinator for Schwed

     

  • Seelmann, Samara, Volga

    2011 Village Report for Seelmann

     

    I am proud to announce that Seelmann colony, a Catholic colony on the "Wiesenseite" or meadow side of the Volga, also finally has a village coordinator.  Although I have no known direct ancestry from the village there was significant migration of families to Hölzel with surnames that I was working on to spark an interest.  The interest began in my research on the Trausch family from Dehler which suddenly had the migration of Johannes Trausch, one of two brothers to Seelmann before the 1834 census.  Before I volunteered to be the Seelmann village coordinator I was already working on the lineage of many of the families including Basgal, Bundang/Bondank, Dietrich, Frank, Haag/Haagen, Krämer, Maibach,  Molleker, Obert, Redel, Ruppelt, Schell, Sewald, Trausch, Weiss, and Ziegemann.

     

    In 1834 there were a total of 142 households in Seelmann colony. The list of the surnames in 1834 include Armbrust, Bähr, Basgall, Bassler, Beil, Beimler, Breder, Brenner, Brineau, Bundang (Bondank), Danndörfer, Deng, Dietrich, Dietzel, Diwi, Dulson, Eberlein, Eckermann, Fasching, Fenzel, Fischbach, Frank, Friedrich, Fromm, Haag, Hein, Heindel, Heintz, Hess, Hoffmann, Kari, Karpf, Keiler, Kitschler, Klug, Kormann, Krämer, Kreismann, Maibach (from Dehler), Maleker (Molleker from Brabander), May  (Mai), Mielchin, Morbach, Morbi, Müller, Neimann, Neubauer, Obert  (from Brabander), Paul, Raab, Rau, Redel, Rein, Riel, Rolsing, Ruppelt, Rundau, Sander, Schafer, Scharff, Schell  (from Seewald), Schelborn, Schermel, Schmall, Schmidt, Schreiner, Schwartz, Schwemmler, Seelmann, Sewald   (the Sewald family had origins in Sewald colony), Specht, Spehrlein, Spendehl, Stankewitz, Staudaker  (This appears to be another variation of the Stalldecker/Stahldecker family from Brabander), Steineker, Stolz, Trausch  (from Dehler), Urich, Valenton, Weber, Weiss, Wetsch, Werwitske, Ziegemann  (from Hölzel),  and Zimmermann.

     

    Jim Osborne

    Village Coordinator for Seelmann

    15 January 2012

  • Seewald, Saratov, Volga

    2011 Village Report for Seewald

    For the most part, many of the records from the middle 1800's to the early 1900's have been translated and incorporated into spreadsheets.  With the help of more than 100 people on the Rothammel / Seewald net-serve, we can track almost everyone back to the original settlers.  We received 25-30 requests for information and collected several dozen obituaries.

    Many have been helpful with donations for interpretation assistance and getting records. Recently, there has been some information coming from South America, with much potential to add to our database.  We have about 30,000 names fairly well documented with quite a few names to verify and
    add.

    At the convention, we had a few newer members attend, where significant information was shared.  Of significance was the increasing knowledge that more and more of the surrounding villages share some common ancestors from Seewald and Rothammel.  We are working on collecting additional data from
    some of these villages.

    We appreciate having Dr. and Rosi Kloberdancz adding the "stories", perspective and historical background, AHSGR for guidance and support and Nick and Barbara Bretz for our village management and leadership.

    We are looking forward to being added to a web-page and attending the Convention for 2012.

    Joe Gertge for Nick and Barbara Bretz
    Assistant Village Coordinator for Rothammel and Seewald

 

  • Shcherbakovka, Saratov, Volga

    2011 Village Report for Shcherbakovka

    The Shcherbakovka village group of researchers has been one of our most active over the last 15 or 20 years.  Kathy O’Malley was one of the main drivers while she was the Village Coordinator.  She was instrumental in forming the Lower Volga Village Group that consisted of the nine villages that made up the Galka and Stephan Parishes.  Kathy was honored several years ago (posthumously) with the Distinguished Service Award for her efforts.  I, Janet Flickinger, Shcherbakovka Village Coordinator, have taken up where Kathy left off and continue to make much progress.  Rachel Smith is the Village Coordinator for Dreispitz as well as chairperson of the Obituary Project for the Lower Volga Villages. These are the two villages designated by Tim Montania in his bequest after his death in November 2009.  Details of this bequest can be found on page 5 of the AHSGR Fall 2011 Newsletter.  We are also thankful for a great webmaster (and fellow village-coordinator), Gary Martens for our webpage http://www.lowervolga.org/.

    We are fortunate to have several members on the Archive Committee (Ed Hoak and Patti Sellenrick) who also have a personal interest in Shcherbakovka and nearby Lower Volga Villages and have had the personal experience of traveling to Russia and touring some of the archives. This will be very helpful as we choose how to be “good stewards” of the money that Mr. Montania left us to acquire more records.

    A couple of years ago, I purchased copies of most of the Lutheran Church books, (basically 1809-1867 and some records from 1894, 1895 and 1905 years).  We also have the census from 1798, 1834, 1850 and 1857 for Shcherbakovka.  We are thankful to have those records, as some villages are not that lucky, but we are certainly excited to discover all the other records, maps, lists, etc. that are hiding in the Russian archives, just waiting for us to request copies and put more of the pieces of our village puzzle together.

    Janet Laubhan Flickinger

    Village Coordinator for Shcherbakovka

     

  • Solodyri, Volynsk, Volhynia U

 

  • Stahl am Tarlyk, Samara, Volga

    2011 Village Report for Stahl am Tarlyk
     

    During the past year I received thirteen inquires about people and items about Stahl am Tarlyk.  I was able to help seven of these inquires with their searches about people of the village.

    One of these inquiries was about the German Brotherhood movement in the Michigan area. I remembered the Martin family coming to the Brotherhood meetings in Berrien Springs, Michigan.

    I have 19,963 entries in the Stahl am Tarlyk data base which include the censuses of 1798, 1816, 1834, 1850 and 1857.

    Paul Koehler

    Village Coordinator for Stahl am Tarlyk

     

  • Strassburg, Samara, Volga

    2011 Village Report for Strassburg

    Surnames for Strassburg include Balzer, Bauer, Blähm, Blehm, Breyer, Briegemann, Busch, Clauser, Deisner, Dieterle, Engel, Ephraim, Geiss, Gerlach, Graff, Günther, Heidelbach, Heinze, Helwer, Herdt, Klauser, Koerbs (Kerbs), Körbs, Krispins, Lattner, Meier, Metzler, Müller, Opfer, Rau, Repp, Sauerwein, Schäfer, Schlotthauer, Schmidt, Schmunk, Schreiner, Schuber, Seifert, Seigfried, Stuertz, Stürtz, Vogel, Völker, Wassenmüller, and Weber.  The source list of these Village surnames was the 1857 Census from Brent Mai received in the early part of 2010.

    Strassburg was founded in 1860 along the left bank of the Torgun River as a Lutheran colony.  The original resettlers were from the colonies of Galka, Shcherakovka, Kraft, Schwab, Holstein, Dobrinka, and Balzar.  Following the 1941 Deportations, the village was known by its Russian name of Romashki which means daisies.

    Villages in the Lower Volga region were given a fixed amount of land, as described in the history section.  Land was divided, and re-divided periodically, among the households and families in the village.  By the time the 1850's were reached, the amount of land for each family was so small that families could not grow enough crops to both use as food and sell for income.

    The solution was to found new villages, called daughter colonies, in parts of the Lower Volga region were no villages existed.  Most of these villages were on the east side of the Volga River

    With all of the startup activity in establishing a source of information on the villages, I have not been able to post to a standard website.


    Leland Riffel
    Village Coordinator for Frankreich, Neu-Galka, Strassburg, Neu-Weimar, Alt-Weimar, & Weimar Villages

    .

     

     


  • Strassendorf, Samara, Volga

    2011 Village Report for Strassendorf

    Hello all,

    Strassendorf (Street Village) was located about 75 miles SE of Saratov.  I do not know from where the settlers of the village came.  It was probably settled late, i.e.  1860 or later, and was probably a Lutheran village.

    There was no activity this year in Strassendorf.

    Laurin P. Wilhelm

    Village Coordinator for Strassendorf

     

  • Straub, Samara, Volga

     2011 Village Report for Straub
     
    I have had inquiries for the following surnames from Straub this year:  Bopp, Schafer (2), Karle, Scherer, Maul and Weisbrodt.

    The 1834 Straub census has not been located yet.

    The 1850 and 1857 Straub census records are available for purchase from Brent Mai.  Neither the 1850 or 1857 Straub census records have maiden names which makes connecting families more difficult.  I have some Straub birth records and have found some maiden names in these birth records.

    I have found some Straub married women in other nearby villages on 1857 census records listed with maiden names:  Warenburg, Laub, Kukkus, Dinkel, Stahl am Tarlyk, Brunnental, Jost and Lauwe.  The villages were not identified but I was able to recognize the family names and check the 1850 Straub census to find them with their parents.  Many thanks to these VC's for their help with
    finding these Straub ladies:  Leroy Nikolaisen, Dinkel; Ray Heinle, Lauwe; Paul Koehler, Stahl and Beth Davenport, Jost.

    I have information for three Warenburg families from the 1875 Family List (a different name for this census record) from research done at the Engels archive.  One was on my Schiffman familiy from Warenburg and the other two Warenburg families were Bier and Leisle.  Jacob Leisle gave me the information on the research he had done for his families.  I am hoping to get some 1875 Family List research done for some Straub families in the future.

    The Straub First Settler's list has a more specific place of origin than the Kuhlburg List.

    Sharon White
    Village
    Coordinator for Straub

     

  • Susannental

    2011 Village Report for Susannental

    To date our research includes the following:

    The Susannental computer data base includes 5,146 names of families and individuals who are      descendants of Susannental residents.

    The Russian Census computer data base for the Village of Susannental includes information on 1,225 names.

    The Social Security Death Index spreadsheet contains information on 804 individuals.

    Ship records spread sheet includes immigration records for 600 individuals.

    World War 1 draft records spreadsheet includes 161 individuals.

    Obituaries spreadsheet includes information for 165 individuals.

    Michigan, Montanta, and California death index spreadsheet includes information for 242 individuals.

    The cemetery spreadsheet includes information for 199 individuals.

    The Big Horn County Wyoming census spreadsheet includes information for all Russian German residents for the 1910, 1920, 1930 census records.

    We have a web site with general information.   We also have a "My Family" site where members can search our data bases and spreadsheets and also see pictures of the village today.

    Currently we are working on a surname data base of information on early German and Russian data. When completed all information on village surnames from the Kuhlberg lists, Transport lists, 1st settler lists, 1798 census, 1857 census and German migrations to the Russian Volga (1764-1767) will be available for each known village surname.

    Research has confirmed the German roots of the surnames Schmidt and Asmus through church records in early data and German church records.

    Kerry Thompson
    Village Coordinator for Susannental

 

  • Swedish Colonies, Nikolaev and Kherson
    2011 Village Report

    We had no inquiries for any of the villages this year.

    As I mentioned before, the availability of the Lutheran Church records
    online at the LDS website has made research in these villages a lot simpler.

    Karen Wright
    Village Coordinator for the Swedish Villages of
    Alt-Schwedendorf, Klosterdorf, Mühlhausendorf, Schlangendorf

 

 

 

  • Unterwalden Meinhard, Samara, Volga

    2011 Village Report for Unterwalden/Meinhard

    Unterwalden/Meinhard, a Lutheran village, was established on 12 June 1767 by Baron Caneau de Beauregard.  It was one of the 27 "Beauregard Colonies" and was named for the Swiss Canton "Unterwalden".  The name "Meinhard", for which it is also known, was named for an early "mini Mayor" Meinhardt.  The Russian name is Podlesnoye.  Unterwalden was one of the original Mother Colonies.  It is located on the Wiesenseite of the Volga River between Sussanental and Luzern.  Unterwalden is 75 versta (about 50 miles) from Saratov.  It can be found on the Volga River north of Saratov, near Sosnovka (Sussanental) and Baskakovka (Kind).

    I have only had one new contact this year.  Unfortunately, a couple of our contacts have passed away.  I continue to discover information about our village ancestors.

    My village contacts and I continue to await the translation of the 1857 Census which is on LDS microfilm. I wish to thank Bill Picklehaupt (Village Coordinator for Kind) for sharing his finding for the villages in our area.

    I continue to teach a community class on Family History and Genealogical Research for the third year for people of all cultural backgrounds.  It has been a good way to ignite interest in the community for Family History and Genealogical Research.

    I look forward to 2012 and what wonderful discoveries and connections are made for the village of Unterwalden/Meinhard and our ancestors.

    Pennie Elder
    Village Coordinator for Unterwalden/Meinhard


     

     

  • Volhynia
     2011 Village Report for Volhynia

    There were no inquiries received in 2011 for Volhynia.  The new book "Die Deutsche Frage im Schwarzmeergebiet und in Wolhynien" (The German Question in the Black Sea and in Volhynia) by Dietmar Neutatz will be available in 2012 in the AHSGR bookstore.  "Legends of the Germans in Volhynia and Polesye" is available in the bookstore.

    During the Salt Lake City Convention in August 2011 I coordinated the Village Area 8 Volhynia group. One of the members spoke about their trip to Poland, and showed pictures of their ancestral village. A beginning Volhynian researcher was very interested in information contained in the Heritage Hall binder. Earlier in the year, I reorganized and updated the information in that binder.

    As two Village Coordinators were not able to attend the Convention in Salt Lake, I also coordinated the large group in Village Area 12 Bessarabia and the smaller group in Village Area 10 Caucasus.  In the larger group I was able to help beginners with their research. The more advanced researchers shared with each other.

    With input from Leona Janke, I prepared an article and located a map online of Volhynia for the Central California Chapter newsletter.  It appeared in the June 2011 issue on pages 6 and 7.

    In August I attended the Society for German Genealogy in Eastern Europe (SGGEE) annual convention in Winnipeg, MB Canada as a way to network with other Volhynian researchers.

    Following are surnames in the Polish Volhynian and Volhynian database:  Adam, Arndt, Behnke, Berezowski, Benz, Berg, Bieberdorf, Buller(s), Borchert, Busse, Cantor, Chepel, Daher, Dause, Domrose, Drews, Fetter, Fitzer, Gertz, Goering, Gramm, Hartwig, Hepp, Hiller, Hintz, Hinz, Janke, Jantz, Jenke, Jenz, Joseph, Kapro(w)sky, Katha, Kathke, Katke, Koestel-Otto, Kolenosky(Kalinowsky), Kopp, Krentz, Krueger, Kunkel, Loewen, Lucas, Lutz, Marks, Matz, Morganstern, Muhlbeier, Muehlbeier, Neufeld, Neumann, Nickel, Nikkel, Olufka, Olsufka, Olszowka, Patzer, Pfenning, Plieske, Plines, Plischke, Rappauhn, Rast, Ratz, Retzlaff, Rosen, Schmidt, Schroeder, Schultz, Schwanke, Schwandtke, Schwark, Schwarz, Sempf, Sieberts, Ulm, Weick, Wedman, Weidermann, Wendler, Woitt, Zedelmayer, Zietz, Zuch.

    New surnames added in 2011 were Bendzulla, Boese, Gaiewski, Kersten, Schmidt, Schwittay, Unruh.

    Mabel Kiessling
    Village Coordinator for Volhynia

 

  •  2011 Village Report for Volmer
     

    Merry Christmas All.

    I had seven people contact me in regards to Volmer. One contact, who wanted information on the Stang family, prompted me to add source information to all the names in my database.  This was not a small undertaking but through that endeavor I placed last names on people in my database and joined family
    members to each other.  I know now that I should have done this from the start, but who knew how far my researching would take me!

    One contact gave me a book she wrote on her family, as thanks for my work.  It was "Bridging Generations", a Schmidt-Rudel family history (which includes Florian Schmidt, who drew the Volmer Village map).

    I keep looking for more information and reviewing every file on genealogy I have, hoping to make new connections.

    The information everyone is looking for is from 1850 or 1857 onward to the early 1900's.

    Best wishes for the New Year.
    Cathy Hawinkels

    Village Coordinator for Volmer

     

  •  2011 Village Report for Walter and Walter Khutor

    Walter was one of the original Volga mother colonies founded on Aug 28, 1767 and its daughter colony Walter Khutor was located a few miles north across the Medveditza River about in the 1820's to 1850's. The church records for the two are intermingled.

    We have the First Settler's list of 1767 which is remarkably detailed with many German places of origin indicated.  We have not located a census for 1775 as have been found in neighboring villages.  There is also a detailed 1798 census available from AHSGR.  The past few years have been extraordinary with the extant church records from Volgograd obtained by Doris Evans - VC for Frank.  They date from 1839, but marriage and death records do not cover all years.  We have records up to the Revolution and some military records have been obtained.  Birth records for most of 1901 & 1902 are missing.

    The past two years have been spent in translating these records from German and Russian by Mary Mills, Michael Fyler, and Jerry McInnis.  Dorothy Elrod has also been helpful and indexing has been the next stage.  We are now going after later census records but these must be one surname at a time.  We have been targeting those names for which we have no corresponding Pleve Charts.

    Last year we produced a CD of the history of Walter and Walter Khutor with many pictures and stories taken from over 30 years of research and interviews.  Tanja Schell, Vladimir Krainov, Oksana Dorn, Steve Schrieber and others have given us many wonderful pictures.  The CD is not being old but is given to anyone contributing at least $50 to the Walter Research Fund.  We have been working to pay back Doris Evans for the funds outlaid to purchase the records.

    Mary Mills and Michael Fyler are maintaining the Walter Database which is currently at close to 43,000 entries and does not include the names and relationships now found in the Walter records.  We are organizing the family groups when possible.  Michael has answered about 18 inquiries from the United States and Mary and Jean have also been doing this as well.  Jean Roth continues to work on the German Origins of the people from Walter and this includes later arrivals into Walter after the year of the First Settlers list.

    We do need to update our Walter Web site but our Walter Facebook page is very active.  Michael has been able to work with our South American inquiries and research.  There has been increased cooperation with the VC's of the Canton Frank and we plan to be able to have some very active participation at the 2012 AHSGR Convention in Portland.

    Jean A. Roth
    Village Coordinator for Walter and Walter Khutor

     

     

     

  • Warenburg, Samara, Volga

    2011 Village Report Warenburg
     
    I have had the following inquiries about these Warenburg families this year: Gobel, Stumpf, Pfeiffer, Engelhardt, Seibert, Mattern and Herman.

    The 1857 translated Warenburg census is now available for purchase from Brent Mai.  There are maiden names on this census which help make connecting families easier. The 1834 and 1850 Warenburg census records do not have maiden names.  The 1857 Warenburg census has 3,707 people and 303 families listed.  The 1798 Warenburg census has maiden names listed.

    I have had the 1875 Family List (a different name for a census record) research done at the Engels archive for my Schiffman family from Warenburg.  They only searched for the families with this last name and did not look for anyone with a Schiffman maiden name.  Jacob Leisle also had the archive
    do the 1875 Family List for his Bier and Leisle families.  He gave me the information on his Bier and Leisle family searches.  These searches added quite a few names to my Warenburg files.  I am hoping to get more 1875 Family List research done at the Engels archive for more Warenburg families in the future.

    I have found some Warenburg women married in other nearby villages on 1857 census records: Laub, Kukkus, Dinkel, Stahl am Tarlyk, Brunnental, Jost and Lauwe.  The villages were not identified but I recognized the maiden names and connected them after finding them on previous Warenburg census records with their parents.


    Thanks to the following VC's for their help with these census records: Leroy Nikolaisen, Dinkel; Ray Heinle, Lauwe;Paul Koehler, Stahl and Beth Davenport, Jost.   I have found some married Warenburg women in Straub in some of the Straub birth records I have.  The Straub 1850 and 1857 census records do not have maiden names listed.

    Phil Dein, a member of the Central California Chapter, had Pleve charts done for his Dein and Nickel ancestors from Warenburg.  He donated these charts to the Central California AHSGR Chapter in Fresno.
    Copies of these charts can be purchased from this chapter.

    I have received more photos, obituaries and other documents of people born in Warenburg. These copies are very much appreciated.

    The Warenburg First Settler's List has a more specific place of origin than the Kuhlburg List does.  I had this turned around in my last year's VC report.

    I have bought some German parish research books and hope this will help me find more German origins and records.

    Sharon White
    Village Coordinator for Warenburg

     

     

  • Weimar
    2011 Village Report for Weimar

    Surnames for Weimar include Bauer, Bischoff, Fass, Flath, Fox, Garlack, Gerlock, Graf, Gross, Heffel, Heinze, Kerbs, Krenz, Maier, Meyer, Miller, Moore or Mohr, Neiwert, Neiwirth, Neuwerth, Rusch, Scheidt, Schmidt, Schneider, Spindler, Utz, Weichhold, and Weimer.  The source list of these Village surnames was the 1857 Census from Brent Mai received in the early part of 2010.

    The 2010 AHSGR Convention had an informative display on the origination of the Village of Weimar. http://www.ahsgr.org/Villages/inventory/avfi-w.htm#WEIMARS.  History and description of Weimar parish, papers proving German Heritage of Gregor Salzmann, dated 19 November 1938

    Villages in the Lower Volga region were given a fixed amount of land, as described in the history section. Land was divided, and re-divided periodically, among the households and families in the village.  By the time the 1850's were reached, the amount of land for each family was so small that families could not grow enough crops to both use as food and sell for income.

    The solution was to found new villages, called daughter colonies, in parts of the Lower Volga region were no villages existed.  Most of these villages were on the east side of the Volga River.

    With all of the startup activity in establishing a source of information on the villages, I have not been able to post to a standard website.

    Leland Riffel
    Village Coordinator for Frankreich, Neu-Galka, Strassburg, Neu-Weimar, Alt-Weimar, & Weimar Villages

     

  • Wiesenmüller, Samara, Volga

    2011 Village Report for Wiesenmüller
     

    Email traffic has doubled this year with many new contacts from Europe seeking and sharing information.  This year my village coordinator folder contains 488 emails dealing with research into the families from the village of Wiesenmüller.  Researchers in Europe have shared family reports generated by the Engels Archive along with many personal stories and much data concerning descendants of Wiesenmüller families.

    I do not see the 2010 VC Report for Wiesenmüller posted at AHSGR.  Fortunately I kept a copy and from it I see that the Wiesenmüller database contained 11,298 persons. This year the database lists 14,932 persons. A copy of the database is sent annually to AHSGR for inclusion in the "Village Files."

    The Wiesenmüller Database is posted on Ancestry.com, Roostweb's Worldconnect and also at MyHeritage.de.  Because of the time involved in updating these websites I plan to discontinue updating Ancestry.com.  While Ancestry is a good research tool it does not accept GEDCOM data other than names and dates. Notes and amplifying data must be uploaded individually which is fine for someone working a family tree but far too time consuming for working on a database of any size.

    The Jeruslan Nachrichten Website, webmisressed by Sue Kottwitz, continues to be a resource for Jeruslan River Colonies researchers and has a great amount of information concerning the Village of Wiesenmüller and its families.


    CWO Hugh Lichtenwald, US Army, (Ret.)

         from the farm in Monetta, SC
    Village Coordinator, Wiesenmüller


  • Wittman (Soloturn), Samara, Volga

    2011 Village Report for Wittmann

    Wittmann colony seems to be more active this year than last year.  I have a number of inquires, but have not been keep track of them which is my goal for the new year.  These contacts have been so kind as to share their photos and I hope to place them on my site soon.  I maintain my main site, www.volgagerman.net as well as the sites pertaining to my village, www.volgagerman.net/Wittmann.htm.

    Resources available at this time include:

    1. 1798 Census

    2. 1834 Census (not complete)

    3. 1857 Census

    4. 1890 Family List

    5. Birth Records for the years: 1879, 1881

    6. Village Map

    I also subscribe to the magazine, "Volk auf dem Weg" from Germany.  At times there are many interesting articles in here about the different villages and also book articles that people have written about the villages.  The latest article, "Das Schicksal. Der lange Weg nach Solothurn-Wittmann und zuruck" ("Fate. The Long Way to Solothurn-Wittmann and Back") was translated for me by Alexander Herzog and I hope to add that to my website in the near future.  I do purchase books like this, one copy for my library and one for AHSGR, that I feel might be of some help to those researching these villages.

    Any new items that I receive from people or the archives are listed on the website and people are always welcome to e-mail for information about them.  I want to especially thank Brent Mai who allowed me to use the statistics for my villages from his web site.

    I have a copy of the book, "Die Kirchen und das Religiose Leben der Russlanddeautschen: Katholischer Teil" by Joseph Schnurr that helps me with information for my website.

    Kevin Rupp
    Village Coordinator for Wittmann/Solothurn, Russia

     

     

  • Worms, Berezan, Odessa, Kherson

     

     

  •  2011 Village Report for Yagodnaya Polyana

    This year has been an interesting year for me as I take over the Village Coordinator reins from Kris Ball and Patrice Miller.  It certainly has been a slow learning curve for me and trying to fill their shoes will be difficult if not impossible to do. The production of the Yagodnaya Polyana newsletter has been put on the backburner while I do a little struggling with getting "things" organized.  I am looking for someone to help with the production of the newsletter and so far have been unable to get anyone to step up and help.  Hopefully in the new year I will be able to get a small newsletter out.  There have only been a handful of requests for information.

    The 2011 convention was the first one I attended as VC for YP and truthfully was a little disappointed as there were only 3 people who had ties to YP.  It certainly paled in comparison to the 30 or so who attended the convention in 2009 in Medicine Hat.  We did however have an interesting evening and good conversation.

    I created a Facebook page for YP and to date have 50 "likes".  Kris Ball has uploaded some pictures of YP and we have had some positive comments on that.  Hopefully in the future we will be able to share information through this kind of social media and maybe help someone find another piece to their family tree puzzle.

    Marlene Michel
    Village Coordinator for Yagodnaya Polyana

     

  •  

     

  • Zurich, (aka Eckardt), Samara, Volga

    2011 Village Report for Zürich

    (a.k.a. Eckardt)

     

    I received only a few inquiries for Zürich this past year.  I was able to give some limited information in these cases, with the intent of following up with more detail when more recent census information becomes available, in particular the 1857 census.

    As my ancestors are from this village, I have also inched along in finding more clues about them.

    I continue to add to my database, and ever so slowly it grows.  There will be more to come.

    Keith Wilberg
    Village Coordinator for Zürich

    •