Village Coordinator Annual Reports 2012

Village Coordinator Reports (VC Reports) are submitted annually by the Village Coordinators describing research and Correspondence for the past year and future research goals for the village. The reports are submitted to the Village Coordinator Annual Report Editor, Joe Gertge, and published in this portion of the AHSGR website.

Villages A-F

| A | B | C D | E | F |

Villages G-L

| G | H | J | K | L |

Villages M-R

| M | N | O | P | R |

Villages S-Z

| S | T | V | W | Y | Z |

VC Newsletter Editor Michael Frank


  • Ährenfeld / Aehrenfeld, Saratov, Volga

    2012 Village Report
     

     

  • Alexanderdorf
     2012 Village Report

    I have gathered data on Alexanderdorf and related families for years and recently agreed to become the Village Coordinator for AHSGR.

    I have completed the following:

    1.  Created an Excel database.

    2.  Corresponded with residents in several states who have links to Alexanderdorf.

    3.  Reviewed contents in headquarters village file for leads and data. 

    4. Contacted other researchers and village coordinators regarding individuals who may have left Alexanderdorf and relocated to other villages.  Researching movement between the Volga and Caucasus areas.

    5.  Ordered and received the Alexanderdorf 1850 and 1857 census.

    6.  The Center for Mennonite studies is in possession of a document pertaining to the Tiflis, Georgia area; I have requested a copy of this document. 

    7. Purchased numerous maps and publications to assist research.

    8. I was unable to attend the Portland convention but sent a poster board of Alexanderdorf with fellow members of the InterMountain Chapter.

    Future projects:

    1.  Research colonists leaving Wuertemberg, Germany

    2. Create a website for Alexanderdorf.

    3.  Research the Scottish missionary activity near Alexanderdorf.

    4.  Expand research into South America.

    5. Gather additional passenger lists and naturalization records.

    My goal as village coordinator is continued research of Alexanderdorf and to assist others with similar interests. 

    Dee Hert

    Member InterMountain Chapter;Membership Chair

 

  • Alexanderfeld, North Caucasus
     

 

 

  • Alexandertal (Neu-Schilling), Saratov, Volga

    2012 Village Report

    This year I receive 4 inquiries and was able to provide 3 responses which folks found helpful.  We seem to have very few Alexandertal descendants actively researching at this point.

    In addition traffic on the Pleve front has been very low due to virtually no receipt of new charts.

    Which gives me time to work on the AHSGR Germanic Origins index.  There is lively e-mail traffic in this case and I have been able to add several hundred new and expanded entries.  Research on origins is happening and many folk have been willing to share their results with others through the GO index.  If more would so share this tool would be even more effective.  It would be even more effective if updates were moved expeditiously to the web.  My last sizeable update was sent to the webmaster in October.  It has not yet appeared on the web.  That is very discouraging.

    Dick Kraus

    web site: rakgen.com (under development)
    AHSGR Village Coordinator for Alexandertal
    Editor for AHSGR Germanic Origins Index
    Administrator for FTDNA Kraus, Casebolt and Ruggles Surname projects

  • Alt-Danzig, Kirovograd
     
  • Alt-Schilling Saratov, Volga

 

  • Alt-Schwedendorf, Swedish Colonies, Nikolaev and Kherson
    2012 Village Report

    The oldest colony of theSwedish Villages, Alt-Schwedendorf was formed in

    1782 with Swedes from an island off Estonia, now called Hiiumaa.  The German colonies included in the Swedish Villages group are Mühlhausendorf formed in 1805 and Klosterdorf and Schlangendorf formed in the 1806.  They are located in the Dneipr River, north of Berislav..  This group of colonies was renamed to its current name Zmiivka.

     

    I have had no inquiries for 2012.

     

    Karen Wright

    VC for Swedish Villages, Mühlhausendorf, Klosterdorf, Schlangendorf, Alt-Schwedendorf

  • Alt-Weimar
    2012 Village Rrport


    The following 2012 Surnames were researched  for ancestry connections: Heinze  Martin Meier Metzler Michel Schmidt Seifert Seÿfried Weber Weimer Ziegler Zimmermann  

    Surnames for Weimar (Alt-Weimar): Arne Bischoff Braun Bretmann Flath Frank Gerlach Götze Heinze Horst Iskam Kahl Martin Meier Metzler Michel Schimpf Schlotthauer Schmidt Schuckmann Seifert Seÿfried Weber Weimer Wunder Ziegler Zimmermann   The source list of these Village surnames was the 1857 Census from Brent Mai received in the early part of 2010.

    Alt-Weimar was founded in 1861 by Lutheran colonists from Galka, Stephan, Schwab, Dobrinka and Moor.

    Villages in the Lower Volga region were given a fixed amount of land, as described in the History section. Land was divided, and re-divided periodically, among the households and families in the village. By the time the 1850's were reached, the amount of land for each family was so small that families could not grow enough crops to both use as food and sell for income.

    The solution was to found new villages, called daughter colonies, in parts of the Lower Volga region were no villages existed. Most of these villages were on the east side of the Volga River.

    With all of the startup activity in establishing a source of information on the villages; I have not been able to post to a standard website. 
     
    There were about a dozen surname inquiries during 2012, and six dozen surnames researched for the six samara villages that I serve as VC.  Researching of Volga Surnames that present a challenge are: Lorei, Weimer, Herbel.

    Schedule/Event Plans for 2013 are:

    1. Attend the AHSGR Convention at Fort Collins, Colorado

    2. Visit the Family History Library, Olathe, Kansas

    3. Visit Tabor College Library, Hillsboro, Kansas

    4. Visit AHSGR Library, Lincoln, Nebraska

    5. Visit Marion County Cemeteries

    6. Visit Dickinson County Cemeteries

    Leland Riffel

    Village Coordinator for Frankreich, Neu-Galka, Strassburg, Neu-Weimar,
    Alt-Weimar, & Weimar Villages

     

     

     

     

  • Amilchin (Emilchin, Emilcin, Amilcin) Volhynia,
    Ukraine, Russia

 

  • Anton, Saratov, Volga

     

  •  2012 Village Report


    2012 was an active year for the Balzer Colony researchers.  After a lapse of three years, we were able to issue a newsletter.  By the return of undelivered newsletters, we lost a few of our members, but also gained new Balzer researchers.

     

    Attended the Portland Convention.  Although the number of Balzer attendees was disappointingly low, we never the less were able to meet some researchers who we had only known through correspondence.  The convention offered numerous extremely interesting and useful sessions, and Brent Mai’s extensive library provided new clues to Balzer ancestors including one positive find. Assisted Dick Kraus in trying to get others to help with the German Origins Project. Although the session was well attended, there has been little follow-up response.

     

    Volume 2 of our ongoing series of ancestral connections in Germany is now complete and in the last stages of review.  Five marriages and 58 baptisms are listed in the Balzer section. As soon as the entries are reviewed, the information will be sent to Dick Kraus for the German Origins Project.

     

    Discovering one website and one book provided clues to the relatively unknown Danish colonies that preceded the trek to Russia.  The release of the Eichhorn book last Summer provided additional clues to our ancestral homes.  No less than 28 founding families are listed in this volume. The Danish records results will be released in Volume 3 of our series.  We now have identified the ancestral villages of nearly 80 percent of those from the Kurpfalz and 60 percent of those from Isenburg for Balzer. If your village has any Kurpfalz First Settlers, you MUST get hold of a copy of the Eichhorn publication before it goes out of print.

     

    Queries were received from Russia, Germany, Canada and the United States.  We were able to help many of these researchers, but the gap in information after 1857 still poses a problem for most.

     

    2013 is looking to be another good year.  Talks are planned for February and April, and perhaps even at the convention.  We are hoping to release volume 3 sometime this year. Newsletters are also planned.

    W H Boner

     

  • Bangert, Samara, Volga

     2012 Village Report

    There have been 8 inquires about people from the village of Bangert this past year. I was able to help 6 of these inquires from the Bangert data base which has almost 5400 entries.  A letter was received from Germany, after 14 years, about the linage of Johannes Low (Loeb) with information from the church records in the village of Dorf Weil. He was born in the village of Hunoldstah but spent most of his life in Dorf Weil. This was of special interest to me as this was my lineage on my mother’s side of the family.

    I am receiving inquires about people after the 1857 census until the 1900 era. If additional census arise after the 1857 census, I will add to the data base for Bangert.

    Paul Koehler, Village Coordinator for Bangert.

    St Joseph, Michigan and Ellenton, Florida

     

  • Bauer
    2012 Village Report

This year there were approximately 4 requests for information on ancestors from both Bauer and Neu-Bauer Villages for the surnames of Bierig, Fisher, Lenz, Schriener, Stieben, Stoll, and Wagner.  The majority of these requests were unique in the fact that they provided as much, if not more, information back to me which has been recorded in the village records and I would like to take this opportunity to thank each one of these individuals for those contributions.  One example of this was a lineal chart for the Wagner family from 1766 to 1857 which had the largest number of individuals in the village during this time period. Many Great oral stories that have been passed down are also included.

 

We continue to document many Bauer families who immigrated to Mexico prior to arriving in the United States and have identified areas such as Lumaha or Frontera, Mexico.  One family was destined for Galveston, Texas from Bremen, Germany but for unknown reasons ended up in Vera Cruz, Mexico.  Ultimately, all of these families that have been identified migrated up through Brownsville or El Paso, Texas and joined relatives in Oklahoma, Kansas, and Colorado.

 

 The biggest issue in village research continues to be the lack of information between approximately 1860 and 1900.  Goals for 2013 include developing a village website and Facebook page to hopefully connect with more individuals and to provide a collection point of village data and stories.  I have also purchased Olga Litzenberger's "History of the Volga Colonies" book and will have the Bauer information translated.

 

Respectfully Submitted,

 

Michael A. Buck

VC Bauer Village   

  • Borodino, Bessarabio

    2012 Village Report

    http://www.remmick.org/Borodino.Bess.History/PageMigrRoutes.html

     

    I have added a new section that deals with the places of origin of our Borodino ancestors who migrated from Germany.

     

    As always, there has been a great deal of interest in Borodino.  New additions to the family members have been included, also.

     

    Judy Hubert

    remmick@aol.com

    VC Coordinator for Borodino / Bessarabia, S. Russia.

    http://www.remmick.org/Borodino.Bess.Genealogy/index.html

     


  • Brabander, Samara, Volga

    2012 Village Report

     

     

  • Brunnental, Samara, Volga

    2012 Village Report

    This year was a busy year again for the village of Brunnental/Brunnenthal. I continue to find new families through my ongoing research using "Ancestry.com". I've renewed my subscription for another year, as I'm still busy updating one family at a time with census information, military records, death records, passenger listings, naturalization records and passport records. I have recently uploaded the entire Brunnental Database to Ancestry.com, although it is a private tree.  I’ve gotten lots of inquiries and at some point I may go public with it.  This year has been an incredibly busy year for me.  Sometimes I think I generate MORE PAPER than I get put away into the family folders.  I love researching the various families, and love finding new information.  With the inclusion of the 1940 census, we were able to track some families that we had lost…so that was exciting.

     

    We loved getting together this year in Portland for the annual AHSGR convention, and wanted to thank, once again, Lake Boggan, who agreed to host our “village meeting”!  She and her sister did a great job and everyone had a great time.  As always, it was fun to meet people I had only emailed with over the years.  

     

    This year I decided to get an additional subscription to “genealogybank.com”, which is a collection of old newspapers.  It has been a wonderful source for obituaries and other newspaper articles.

     

    I’ve also joined a site called FOLD3.com which has military records, and has also been helpful for researching those that have served in the military.

     

    I've put together a comprehensive list of all passenger lists of those from Brunnental which can be found on our village website.

     

    We have also put together a listing of all those Brunnentalers found within the WWI DRAFT REGISTRATION RECORDS which can be found online at Ancestry.com. This listing of WWI Draft Registrations can also be found on our website.

     

    We also have an ongoing "listserv" through Rootsweb, where those who are interested in sharing information about Brunnental can "join", and then receive emails from anyone else who has also joined the list. This is where I post such things as obituaries, passenger lists as I find them, or other interesting information about our village. It's a great way to keep in touch with everyone, and only send ONE EMAIL to reach everyone. You can join our listserv from the Brunnental webpage (see address below).

     

    Last year we started a FACEBOOK group for Brunnental, and it can be found at: http://www.facebook.com/home.php#!/group.php?gid=227886932609. We have been in contact through FACEBOOK with many new Brunnental descendants. I have posted photos of Brunnental there in hopes of attracting new followers.

     

    I want to again thank Albert Santorius who was instrumental in getting more records concerning Brunnental.  The latest listing included those who left Brunnental in 1922 going to Germany, but then returned to Brunnental several years later and were arrested, shot, or put in prison.  It’s very hard to think they had their freedom, but then returned and suffered terrible hardship and death.    Albert has also been so helpful in posting various Brunnental photos of the school and church to the Russian Website  http://wolgadeutsche.net/    , so as to attract more queries.

     

    I, of course, could not do any of this research without the help of all of the descendants from the village of Brunnental.   You are such an enthusiastic group of people, and you keep me motivated to continue to gather the history and genealogy of our village. Thanks!!!

     

    Sherrie (Gettman) Stahl

    EMAIL ADDRESS sherriestahl@gmail.com

     

    FACEBOOK:   https://www.facebook.com/#!/groups/brunnental/?bookmark_t=group

     

    Website: http://www.brunnental.us/brunnental/index.html

    AHSGR Village Coordinator for Brunnental, Samara, Volga, Russia

     

     

  •  2012 Village Report
     

    Since I was still acting VC for the village of for half of the year,  I will send in a report for my part.

     

    This year has been a bad year for me due to health problems, deaths in my family and cousins.  It was almost impossible for me to keep up. It was with heavy heart that I made the decision to resign my VC position.

     

    I did receive 62 inquiries and hopefully I responded to all of them to their satisfaction.  Many of my inquiries come from a relative who is heavily into research of the Volga Villages.

     

    I want to wish much luck to Denise as she is the VC for Mariental; Kevin Rupp also, I think he has Louis, and he has taken over my web page and newsletter.  I am not sure about who will take Chasselois.

     

    I plan on selling my library of novels on e-bay.  However, my reference material is a problem for me.  Some are heavily used and their condition isn't the best.  There are too many people who want different ones, that I have not made a decision on them.

     

    Thelma Mills - VC for Chasselois through May of 2012.

  • Chortitza Settlement/Colonies

    2012 Village Report

     

    I began my term as Village Coordinator the Chortitza Settlement Colonies this past summer.  Attached you will find a full listing of the 20 villages that were part of the Chortitza Settlement, established in 1789.  The first three Mennonite villages established in the Ukraine, then known as South Russia, were Chortitza, Kronsweide and Neuenburg.  I attended the 2012 AHSGR Convention at Concordia University at Portland, OR, where I convened the Mennonite Researchers' Roundtable on Saturday, with about ten attendees participating.  Additionally, I gave a presentation on Early Immigrant Mennonite Settlements in Central Kansas:  The Making of the Wheat State.

     

    I avidly harvest obituaries from all local newspapers, as central Kansas has a large population of Mennonite descendants from the Ukraine, including the Chortitza Colonies.  The obituaries are posted and then sent to Colorado to be included in SOAR.  This has been a habit of mine for many years, since joining AHSGR.  My data base includes thousands of obituaries.  I also include Lutheran and Catholic obits that are of German Russian heritage.

    "Life Events" are also harvested from local newspapers and sent to Colorado for inclusion in SOAR.

     

    I had one specific inquiry and contact on the Chortitza Colonies since my assuming the role of VC,  I have also had several inquiries regarding Mennonite ancestry. 

     

    Karen Suderman Penner  

     

     

  • Dehler, Saratav, Volga
    2012 Village Report
  • Dietel, Saratov, Volga
    2012 Village Report

    This has been another great year for Dietel as we were able to have Olga Litzenburger write a chapter about Dietel and Dreispitz since they were not included in her last book.  I also had a German document that was sent to me by Sergei Kindsvater that was written by a school teacher who was one of the first group that settled Dietel. 

     

    The document was in German Script and Sergei translated it to regular German and Olga included it in the chapter on Dietel.  We are now waiting for the Litzenberger Russian chapter to be translated into English.  When this is done we will be presenting it for publication in our Journal and then posted on our website.  Olga is a great history researcher and is a colleague of Pleve.

     

    Several individuals have contacted us for information on their families. We are continuing to place any information that we have in the Dietel file at Lincoln.  I also have the Sergei Kindsvater file on Kindsvaters if anyone would like to access it.

     

    We also have a small web page for Dietel at www.intermountainchapterahsgr.blogspot.com  If you want to post there send the information to me at

    donsoeken@gmail.com Over time we will have more information and links to other websites.

     

    Don Soeken and Karen Bouton, Co-village coordinators for Dietel

     

    *******************************************************

    I became the co-coordinator for Dietel just this past summer. Being fairly new to just discovering I have Volga-German ancestors, these past several months have been more of a ‘learning and gathering’ process rather than a ‘providing information’ process. I am currently corresponding with Ed Ring (surnames: Ring, Batt, Miller/Mueller, Busch, Lackman) and Helen Hadley (surname: Ruf) about their Dietel ancestors.

    AHSGR did send copies of the Dietel file they had and the 1798 census documents will soon be arriving. Several VC’s have provided excellent advice and support so as my Dietel file grows I hope to successfully answer future inquires that come my way.

    On Facebook I have joined two Volga German pages (https://www.facebook.com/#!/groups/17562998912/ and https://www.facebook.com/#!/groups/2570305615/); and a Russia Genealogy Research page (https://www.facebook.com/#!/RussiaGenealogy). I read The Volga Germans In Russia and The Americas, From 1763 To the Present by Fred C. Koch that I found extremely interesting. I also joined the Greater Seattle Chapter of AHSGR.

    A few of my goals for 2013 include: continue to follow other VC’s advice; create a database; purchase the available censuses from Concordia University; explore creating a Dietel Facebook page; and attend AHSGR convention in Fort Collins.

    Respectfully submitted,

    Karen Bouton

    Co-VC Dietel Village

 

  •  2012 Village Report

     

  • Dobrinka, Saratov, Volga

    2012 Village Report

     

    Church records available for Dobrinka from the Russian Archive in Volgograd

    are:  Births 1852-1867, 1882-1894, deaths 1904, marriages 1894, 1895, 1905, and the family list covering 1835-1846.  These records have been purchased and access to extracted information from the records is available by making a contribution towards the purchase of $50 for one surname, or $100 for access to all records.  Information from the 180 page family list, which includes detailed information on people living in the village between 1835-1846, has been extracted.  Approximately 75% of the birth records have been translated.  This includes complete translation of all for surnames of interest to contributors, plus all other records through about 1885.  In addition to the records from Volgograd, there are death and marriage records for unknown years at the Russian Archive in Saratov.  No lists of Dobrinka residents drafted into the Russian Army have been found.

     

    During 2012, I had 262 emails with people concerning people from Dobrinka, and their descendants.  The primary means of communication for things related to Dobrinka are through a Facebook page, the Dobrinka website: http://www.dobrinka.org/ , the Dobrinka mailing list with instructions at:

    http://lists.rootsweb.ancestry.com/index/intl/RUS/RUS-SARATOV-DOBRINKA.html, and there is a private mailing list for people who have contributed towards the purchase of the church records.  I continue to receive inquiries from people in Germany and Russia who find me almost exclusively through the Dobrinka website.

     

    During 2012, additions to the Dobrinka database included tracing families from other villages who married people from Dobrinka.  I have also added information from the First Settlers List by Dr. Pleve, and The Kulberg Lists.  I continue to do extensive research on the descendants of Dobrinka people who immigrated to the United States and Canada.

     

    Gary Martens

     

    Dobrinka VC

     

  • Dönhof, Saratov, Volga

    2012 Village Report
     

     

  • Dreispitz, Saratov, Volga

    2012 Village Report
     

    Over the last year we have had a good number of inquiries which I have assisted with. Surnames included: Steinle, Stroh, Langhofer, Dick, Heinz, Feil, Herbel, Schmiess In addition we had several inquiries which came from Germany and a few others from new AHSGR members that listed Dreispitz as one of their villages.

    Not only were we able to provide these people with information but we also obtained information about their families to add to our village database.

     

    Earlier in the year my 13 year old son was told in his Social Studies class that his teacher was a German from Russia and that his family was from the village of Dreispitz.  Not missing a beat my son raised his hand and told the teacher that he was also a GR and that his father knew all about Dreispitz.  Needless to say I immediately sent a note to the teacher which my son hand delivered.  Shortly afterwards I received a phone call and we have been corresponding over the last 9 months.  

     

    Throughout the year I have contributed obits to the Lower Volga Obit Project and have continued to maintain the STORE website for the AHSGR organization.

    https://store.ahsgr.org/default.aspx  It's been somewhat challenging with the amount of time I spend on the road travelling for work but made it another year with the support of the AHSGR Staff and Dennis Zitterkopf.

     

    Unfortunately this year I was unable to attend the convention due to previous plans I had made several years ago.   I traced one of my wife's family lines back to a man named Frederick Hummel which founded Hummelstown, PA in 1762.   So I took my family to participate in the towns 250th town celebration as descendants.

     

    Mark Wills

    Co-Village Coordinator for Dreispitz

    *******************************************************************

     

    Over  the course of 2012, many researchers from Germany, Canada, and United States  continued seeking information on families in Dreispitz and nearby villages. I am  pleased to report that approximately thirty (30) inquiries were received during  2012. Mark and I were able to assist these individuals with their research by  either furnishing information directly, or referring them to another Village  Coordinator. Since some of the inquiries involved Kansas, several people came to  my house to meet and work on their research.

     

    It is always fun to meet other  researchers face to face. On a more personal note, my research became even more  interesting than usual when I received an inquiry concerning a surname in my own  research. I am happy to say that after exchanging numerous emails, I found and  became acquainted with a sixth cousin once removed who resides in  Canada.

     

    It  is important to note that AHSGR - Lincoln received two memberships listing their  ancestral village as Dreispitz. I am pleased to report that I was able to assist  them in their research as well.

     

    Throughout  the past year, work continued in effort to follow the bequest left by Timothy  Montania. At the present time, the research committee is in the process of  securing records for Shcherbakovka. This process takes time, but I remain  hopeful that there will be monies to secure records for Dreispitz in the  future.

    I  have continued to receive many obituaries, and have collected many to be  included in the Lower Volga Obituary Project. Please note that those not included at present may be seen on the SOAR Website for AHSGR. At the present  time I have another 1,000 obituaries for these websites. A number of these were  sent to me by an avid researcher collecting obituaries of persons born in Russia  after 1858. I feel very fortunate to be able to pass on this information.

    Unfortunately,  I was unable to attend the Internnational AHSGR Convention in Oregon. However, I  am looking forward to both Colorado and Nebraska conventions in the  future.

     

    I  had an unusual experience. I ordered the book, Anton, by Dale Eisle with the  intention of giving it to my great grandsons. The book is about the lives of two  young boys, ages 8 and 10. I decided to read it before sending it off as gift.  Although I found the story to be quite interesting, it contains some strong  language that may be offensive to some readers. In short, I was unable to gift  the book to my great grandchildren. I  mention this in my report because I wanted to highlight the importance of  sharing our history with the younger generations.

     

    Mark  Wills, Co-Village Coordinator, continues to be a great assistance to me and  AHSGR in many ways. I am most appreciative of his ongoing efforts, as well as  those of the many researchers I've had the fortune of coming into contact the  past year.

     

    Rachel  E. Smith, Village Coordinator for Dreispitz Chairman of the Lower Volga Obituary Project 

     

  • Eckheim, Samara, Volga

    2012 Village Report

     

    I am combining the reports for these villages, because there were no inquiries at all for Müller, and although I had inquiries for Eckheim, I was unable to help the majority, as they requested information from the years after 1858.

     

    The last census I have is 1858, and although I know there was a great deal of activity in Eckheim after that, (after all, my own father was born there in 1892), I don’t have the records.   I know they do exist, but I am trying to get by on my retirement benefit and Social Security, which will not allow me to make any extra purchases.  If the Eckheimers out there are willing to pool their money to obtain more records, please contact me.  I simply cannot do it on my own.

     

    Suzanne Heinitz-Dodge

     

    VC for Eckheim, Holstein, & Müller

     

    eckheimvc@gmail.com

     

    AHSGR VC for Eckheim, Holstein, & Müller (Mueller)

     

     

  • Eigenfeld, North Caucasus

     
  • Eigenheim, Akkerman, Bessarabia

 

  • Enders, Samara, Volga

    2012 Village Report


    Submitted by Beth Davenport, Village Coordinator, Database Coordinator, Webmaster.

     

    In 2012, I had inquiries for Moitz, Dotz, Gittler & Hardt, and I was able to assist descendents in finding their families.

     

    I continue to maintain the Enders website and Facebook.  I've been able to add some new information to the Enders database with the help of Don Zochert, the new Fischer vc.

     

    I have uploaded the Enders database to a private ancestry family-tree file for further research.  As time permits, I'm attempting to update Enders family information with documentation found on ancestry.com.

     

    Enders currently has census records for 1765, 1798, 1834, 1850 and 1857.  There is also a 1874 "Family List" with entries to 1896.   Enders has recent photographs thanks to Randi Bolyard and Marilyn Murray. The Convention in Portland gave me the opportunity to connect with descendants from surrounding villages. There were no known attendees seeking information for Enders.

     

    BETH Mueller-Rohn DAVENPORT

    Enders (Ust-Karaman) Village Coordinator http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~enders/

 

  • Erlenbach, Saratov, Volga

    2012 Village Report
     

     

     

  • Fischer, Saratov, Volga
    2012 Village Report

    I became village coordinator for Fischer in March-April 2012. In addition to helping other researchers explore Fischer connections, my plan was to restore a web presence for the village and to publish a database of persons born in Fischer, who lived there, or who emigrated from Fischer to other countries.

    The web page, known as Fischer: The Forgotten Village, launched on May 28, 2012, with 43 entries in a Fischer village database, two research guides, two book reviews, and two collections of contemporary photographs of Fischer.

    One of the latter was an account by Tim Weeder, Paulskoye village coordinator, of his visit to Fischer with his late father.

    When the web page ceased publication in November, the online village database had entries on 96 individuals. I also maintained an off-line working database of 300 Fischer residents being researched and prepared for publication.

    Among the research articles posted on the web page were a piece on the first settlers of Fischer, a study of early mayors of Fischer, and a piece on unanswered questions that had been posted to the previous Fischer web page maintained by former coordinator Roger Töpfer.

    Dorothy Gaus Hiscock, daughter of Alexander Gaus of Fischer, contributed a nostalgic piece on another Fischer immigrant, Brother John Henry, a band master in Flint, Mich.

    As the year went on, the number of reviews increased. Guides included a review of early German agricultural terms and suggestions on reading German script. Illustrated, personal reminiscences of recent visits to Fischer were added. These included a piece by Martha Neville of Nashville, Tenn., seeking traces of her husband’s grandmother along the Volga, and Linda Currie’s lovely account of a rainy day in Fischer.

    This web project would not have been attempted without the encouragement of three other AHSGR village coordinators, Tim Weeder of Paulskoye and Mike and Steven Grau of Nieder-Monjou. I’m very appreciative of their help.

    During the year I received a modest number of  queries. A researcher in Utah was anxious to know what wonderful materials I’d received from the previous village coordinator (none). I helped a researcher in Wuppertal, Germany, with several issues, and she contributed information to the Fischer web site in return. Her grandmother, Anna Elisabeth Walter, was born at Fischer in 1901. Another researcher wondered whether her family had emigrated to the United States from Fischer. I prepared an extensive background report and line of evidence suggesting Ober-Monjou as a more likely place of origin; by the time I submitted my findings to her, Kevin Rupp had provided her with a family chart coming to the same conclusion. Man, he’s fast!

    Michael Walter’s query at the AHSGR convention in Portland about resources for deciphering old German script led to my guide on that topic. Tim Weeder and Steven Grau kindly fed me queries of interest to them. I worked briefly with Konstantin Petrunin, who was then still in the process of setting up a record retrieval service for Volga German researchers.

    This work was stimulating and rewarding, especially because of the friendship, encouragement, and expertise of Tim, Steven, and Mike. By year’s end, however, it was clear to me that I could not continue.

    I have contributed electronic PDF and Microsoft Word print-outs of Fischer web page material, a GEDCOM of my working village database file (a work in progress), and a number of other research materials to the AHSGR Library in Lincoln for placement in the Fischer village folder, if the librarian desires. These will be available to other researchers and to the next Fischer village coordinator.

    I strongly encourage other village coordinators to embrace the Lichtenwald Rule of making research information freely available to researchers.

    Depositing village resource material with the AHSGR Library is one way to accomplish this. For coordinators with web sites, an online database, open to web-based search engines and accessible to anyone who googles their lines or village interests, can make research and findings more widely available, and more useful.

    --Don Zochert 

 

  • Friedensdorf

     

  • Friedrichsfeld, North Caucasus

 

  • Frank-Kolb Village Database, Saratov, Volga

    2012 Village Report

    Submitted by Maggie Hein and Doris Evans

     

     In memory of our long-time Kolb co-VC Thelma Koch Sprenger, who passed away April 30, 2012. 

     

     Doris and I responded to more than 70 inquiries during 2012.  If a person's ancestors are in fact from Frank, we are generally able to provide them with a complete ancestral chart back at least to the First Settlers, if not several generations back into Germany.  Sometimes this is a simple matter of looking up an existing family in our database and exchanging a few e-mails, sometimes this requires hours of searching through untranslated records in an attempt to find a missing marriage or birth record, and an exchange of many e-mails. 

     

    Research inquiries come from a variety of sources.  The AHSGR office forwards new member information to us if the person fills out a genealogy chart and indicates Frank ancestry.  There are two Frank web sites, both of which receive queries, and a RootsWeb mailing list.  We have a Facebook page, which is becoming an increasingly important source of contact with Frank and Kolb descendants. And of course people find our e-mail addresses on the AHSGR web page and on various message boards. 

     

    We continue the slow but steady process of translating the records we have obtained from Russia.  As of today, the following Frank records have been

    translated: Births and Baptisms for 1839 - 1879, a total of 12,376 records; Engagements & Marriages for 1839 - 1852, a total of 643 records; and Deaths for 1839 - 1845, a total of 770 records.  Much of the material that we had in the Frank database prior to acquiring the church records came from Pleve charts and Pleve's census compilations, which we thought gave us a fairly good picture of Frank genealogy.  As we have worked our way through the translated records, we have discovered numerous individuals and events that are missing from the Pleve charts.  We are constantly adding records and correcting existing records in an effort to make the information we provide

    to Frank descendants as accurate as possible.  

     

    Translation of the Frank church records has also alerted us to errors in the published Frank census records.  We also encountered problems with the published Kolb census records when we acquired the 1850/1857 Kolb census records.  Unfortunately, I have been unable to obtain the materials that were provided to AHSGR when these census books were originally published.  I don't know if the errors originated with the extraction of the data from the Russian records, with the translation, or with the formatting of the books for publication.  Anyone acquiring either the Frank or Kolb census books or Frank or Kolb Pleve charts should be aware that they are incomplete and may

    contain errors.   

     

    Most of you are familiar with "Memory Books".  These are books published in Russia that list the individuals who were imprisoned in various Labor Camps after 1941.  The paperback books are printed in small quantities, so obtaining copies can be difficult.  Lucky for us, there are several Russian web sites where online indexes of some of the "Memory Books" are now available.  The Chelyabmetallurgstroy Labour Camp, Nischni Tagil Labour Camp, and the Bogoslovlaga Labour Camp all have searchable, online databases.  I have the paperback book version of the Bogoslovlaga database, and from that I knew that there were a significant number of people from the Frank area who were sent there.  Using the online version, I was able to create an Excel spreadsheet of the 2,274 individuals from Frank area villages who were imprisoned in Bogoslovlaga.  The Excel spreadsheet has links to the individual record pages on the web site so that a user can just click on a name on the spreadsheet to access the individual in the online database.  I distributed the spreadsheet to the other Frank area VCs and made it available on our Facebook page.

     

    After the Kulberg book came out, Doris and I prepared a table of all of the families listed in the Frank First Settlers List (FSL), along with a reference to where that family could be found in the Kulberg book and the Transport book. I gave this out as a handout at the 2011 convention, but I really didn't have a good way to distribute it to those who were not at the convention, short of individually e-mailing it.  As you know, we cannot attach files to posts on the RootsWeb mailing lists.  Those of you who use Facebook know that posting anything other than an image on a Facebook page is difficult.  Both problems can be solved by uploading the file to a cloud storage site, and then forwarding the link to your mailing list or posting in on your Facebook page.  I am using the free version of DropBox for this purpose, but there are many other companies that offer a similar service.  I have successfully done this with both the Frank FSL table and the list of the Frank area people who were sent to the Bogoslovlaga Labor Camp. 

     

    Because the Frank and Kolb records are now combined in the same database, Doris and I also spend a considerable amount of time processing the Kolb records.  This year's project has been a continuation of last year's census and draft records project.  Once all of the information from the 1850/1857 Kolb census was input into the database, we had a good starting point for the draftee records.  We have draftee lists for most years from 1884 - 1917.

    These represent records for men born in 1863 - 1896. So far the records for

    1884 - 1907 have been translated, a total of 825 records.  The draftee lists give the draftee's date of birth, his father's name, the household number in the 1857 census, and personal information about the draftee such as his marital status, religion, literacy, and profession.  In addition, some of the records give the father's age, the names and ages of the draftee's brothers, and the names and ages of the draftee's children (if any).

     

    As with the Frank church records, the translation is only the first step in the process.  As each year of records is translated, Doris and I compare the records to our existing data. In the case of Kolb, this is census records, Birth and Baptism records for 1873 - 1913, a total of 6,255 records, Marriage records for 1845 - 1907, a total of 1,525 records, and Death and Burial records for 1873 - 1911, a total of 3,516 records.  Unfortunately, the marriage records for Kolb (unlike Frank) are summary information only, giving only the names of the bride and groom, and sometimes not even giving their ages.  Using the census household number and the father's age, we can match each draftee with his ancestors in the 1850/1857 census.  In some cases older brothers who were born in the gap between 1857 and 1863 were listed.   Once we got to the 1894 list, we were able to begin matching the draftees to their birth records.  If the draftee is noted as being married, or having children, we can match these up with the marriage and birth records.  

     

    Thank you to Barry Heimbigner, Tanja Schell, and Judi Jarrett for translating the seemingly endless supply of records. 

     

    Thank you to our friends in Argentina for their willingness to share their research findings.  Special thanks to Patricia Gayol Windecker for sharing her collection of obituaries of people who were born in Frank.  I was able to match up many of the individuals that she identified as having been born in Frank with families that we have in the Frank database.  This will enable us to assist descendants in Argentina with future genealogy research. 

     

    We had an excellent turnout for Frank Canton meetings and events at the 2012 AHSGR Convention in Portland.  We had more than 60 people in our Village Area Group meeting, and we had about 75 people at the Frank Canton dinner arranged by Jean Roth.  I gave two presentations on basic Volga German Genealogy research, and Doris and I gave a presentation on connecting the various records for Kolb. 

     

  • Frankreich, Samara, Volga

     2012 Village Report

    Map 6, Quadrant E-8, Frankreich 50 09 N 46 38 E

    The following 2012 Surnames were researched  for ancestry connections: Ehrlich Lorenz Reich Schmidt Schwab Wunsch


    Surnames for Frankreich: Ehrlich Eichmann Geier Lattner Lorenz Messerschmidt Reich Schmidt Schwab Wunsch Ziegler  The source list of these Village surnames was the 1857 Census from Brent Mai received in the early part of 2010.

    Frankreich was founded in 1861 by Lutheran colonists resettling from Galka, Shcherbakovka, and Schwab.

    Villages in the Lower Volga region were given a fixed amount of land, as described in the History section. Land was divided, and re-divided periodically, among the households and families in the village. By the time the 1850's were reached, the amount of land for each family was so small that families could not grow enough crops to both use as food and sell for income.

    The solution was to found new villages, called daughter colonies, in parts of the Lower Volga region were no villages existed. Most of these villages were on the east side of the Volga River.

    With all of the startup activity in establishing a source of information on the villages; I have not been able to post to a standard website. 

    Leland Riffel

    Village Coordinator for Frankreich, Neu-Galka, Strassburg, Neu-Weimar, Alt-Weimar, & Weimar Villages
  • Galka, Saratov, Volga
    2012 Village Report

    Church records available for Galka from the Russian Archive in Volgograd are:  Births 1863-1884, 1901-1902, deaths 1904, and marriages 1894, 1895, and 1905.  These records have been purchased and access to extracted information from the records is available by making a contribution towards the purchase of $50 for one surname, or $100 for access to all records.  Approximately 95% of the birth records have been translated.  No lists of Galka residents drafted into the Russian Army have been found.  It was recently discovered that there is a census for 1897 at the Russian Archives in Saratov.  A cost on purchasing information from that census has not been obtained yet.

    During 2012, I had 51 emails with people concerning people from Galka, and their descendants.  The primary means of communication for things related to Galka are through a Facebook page, the Galka website: http://www.galkagr.org/ , the Galka mailing list with instructions at:

    http://lists.rootsweb.ancestry.com/index/intl/RUS/RUS-SARATOV-GALKA.html  <http://lists.rootsweb.ancestry.com/index/intl/RUS/RUS-SARATOV-DOBRINKA.html,  and there is a private mailing list for people who have contributed towards the purchase of the church records.  I continue to receive inquiries from people in Germany and Russia who find me almost exclusively through the Galka website.

     

    During 2012, additions to the Galka database included tracing families from other villages who married people from Galka.  I have also added information from the First Settlers List by Dr. Pleve, and The Kulberg Lists.  I continue to do extensive research on the descendants of Galka people who immigrated to the United States and Canada.

     

    Gary Martens

     

    Galka VC

     

     
  • Glückstal Colonies Research Association

    2012 Village Report

    Bergdorf, Glückstal, Kassel, Neudorf, Grigoriopol, and Hoffnungstal

     

  • Gnadenfeld, (Neu-Moor/Moor), Samara, Volga

    2012 Village Report
     

    Gnadenfeld, (Russian name Kirovskoye), small "daughter" colony, located in the Samara Province, on the weisenseite (meadow side) of the Volga, Quandrant E-5, Map #6 (Stumpp, District of Krasny-Kut.

     

    I do not receive many inquiries for Gnadenfeld, due to its small population.

     

    This past year I assisted 3 people researching Gnadenfeld families and six people researching families from Moor and other villages.

     

    I continue to collect surnames from Gnadenfeld and the "mother" colony of Moor, including ship records, declarations of intent, naturalization records, census records and obituaries.

     

    Irma A. Waggoner, V.C.

    iawagg@earthlink.net

     

     

  • Goebel, Saratov, Volga

    2012 Village Report

    Map 6, coordinates B7

    Goebel A.K.A. Gebel, Goebel, Göbel, Ust-Gräsnucha, Ust-Grjasnucha, Ust-Grjaznucha, Ust-Gryaznukha, Ust-Grasnukha, or Ust-Graesnucha:

    A Russian Catholic German village situated on the western side of the Volga.

    I took on the duties of the Village Coordinator for Goebel around September 2009. I am continuing to add to the village chart of names, births and marriages known regarding the village of Goebel. I am currently using Family Tree Maker. I received AHSGR information, files, links, databases and materials in addition to the 1798, 1816/1834 and 1850/1857 census reports I had already obtained from AHSGR, Rosemary Larson and Brent Mai respectively. I also have a copy of Pleve's Vol II with the FSL for Goebel. I also have Göbel birth records (1894-1900) acquired from the Volgograd archive, with the help of Kevin Rupp.

    I had approximately 7 different people contact me this year regarding the Village of Goebel, with one being a new contact and the remainder being continuation of Goebel contacts made in previous years.  I was able to help most folks out with at least some information they did not previously have. I also share information with other VCs with Goebel-related questions and some common surname contacts, especially among the Roman Catholic villages. Most contacts were from the U.S., but I also have been enjoying exchanges with contacts from Canada and Russia.

    Ben Markel
    Goebel Village Coordinator

     

  • Graf, Samara, Volga

     2012 Village Report

 

  • Grimm, Saratov, Volga
    2012 Village Report
  • Güldendorf, Grossliebental, Odessa, Kherson
     
  • Hoffnungstal, Akkerman, Bessarabia
     
  • Holstein, Saratov, Volga

    2012 Village Report

     

    I had a number of email inquiries for Holstein in 2012.  Some of the people I was able to help, and some I couldn't  I sold my mobile home in the spring, and had to put most of my things into storage for much longer than I had anticipated, as I was battling a number of health issues at the same time, which needless to say, set me back considerably.

     

    I tried to contact all new members of AHSGR whose ancestral village included Holstein.

     

    I have a copy of the Lutheran Church records 1799  to 1852.  However, If anyone is desirous of  receiving information for more than one surname, they should direct their inquiries to Ed Hoak, from whom they may purchase the entire record which includes births, deaths and marriages.  Ed is hoping to recoup some of the original expense involved with obtaining this large file.  hoak@comcast.net

     

    Requests came by way of email and through my account at Ancestry.com

     

    Names for which I did a search, and in most cases was able to  help include:

     

    EHRHARDT, HERBER, KELLER, KELLN, KNAUSS, KUXHAUSEN, MEIER, NUSS, SCHNEIDER, and STRECKER.

     

    I also had an inquiry for the surname DANIEL or DANIELS.  However, I was unable to help with this, as I have no record of the name in Holstein.

     

    I was unable to attend the Portland Convention, due to illness, but hope to be able to go to Ft. Collins this year.

     

    Suzanne Heinitz-Dodge

     

    VC for Holstein

    AHSGR VC for Eckheim, Holstein, & Müller (Mueller)


  • Holzel, Samara, Volga

    2012 Village Report

     


     

  • Huck, Saratov, Volga

    2012 Village Report

    This has been a good year for support for village Huck. I even established a personal FaceBook account and became an administrator for a Huck FaceBook page. (Yes, I know I had vowed to many I would not establish a FaceBook

    account.) There is considerable traffic on the Huck page by researchers in Argentina, primarily communicating with one another as a clearing house for them. Pam Wurst assisted me for the response to an inquiry from Germany about a family that lived in the Lincoln North Bottoms during the 1930s. A review of available Lincoln church and city records identified the family but the trail ended in Lincoln.

     

    I enjoyed corresponding with several persons from Argentina about village Huck. I exchanged information with Patricia Windecker and Fabian Zubia (I was fortunate to meet him during the 2012 convention in Portland). They have access to the 1895 Argentina census which provides a new source of material about villagers and their families who left Huck for the New World - but settled in Argentina.

     

    I received only two inquiries from Germany and none from Russia. This year's inquiries were very similar to last year. While there was an interest in obtaining anything I had about a surname for a family, so many wanted help for the 1858-1888 black hole period in the Huck available records.

    Fortunately I did obtain some family history for surnames for the Huck database after the beginning of 1900. The inquiries were for: Bohl, Blum, Hempel, Steinbrecher, Ekkert, Michel/Michael, Huck, Schneider, Hein, Kreick, Schlotthauer, Schaaf, Brozmore/Brotzmann, Schaefer, Schultheis, Krieger, Brill, Koch, Niederhaus, Sittner and Voelcker. When I could, I would inform the Huck researchers I knew who had similar interests so they could also communicate with the person.

     

    Dennis Zitterkopf

    Huck village coordinator



     

  • Husaren, Saratov, Volga
     
  • Hussenbach, Linevo Ozero, Saratov, Volga

     2012 Village Report

    The exciting news for Hussenbach is that a copy of the 1897 census has been found. Funds are being sought to purchase and translate this census. Contact me for more information or to help with this project.

    I attended the Convention at Concordia University in Portland and was able to meet with several Hussenbach villagers on a one on one basis. The Frank Canton meeting was well attended and after a brief introduction split into village groups. Many people find themselves as members of more than one village and were able to go from group to group.

    I have created an Excel page showing which Family names are found in different sources, including: Kuhlberg lists, Volga transport list, 1798, 1816, 1834, 1850, 1857 censuses, Volgograd records to 1845, and Hussenbach database. You can download the file from my Hussenbach web page: http://hussenbach.weebly.com/names-found-in-records.html. It is 16 pages, and includes some of the names found in the daughter colonies of Ährenfeld, Langenfeld, Neu-Bauer and Neu-Hussenbach and their original colony if known.

    Translation of the Volgograd records is an ongoing process. So far 10,500 individual records have been translated. David Nelson ably translated all of the records past 1897 that were in Russian.

    Records found in the Volgograd Archives:

    Births:  1818-1838 (2,647 records), 1839 -1846 (1,053 records), 1896-1904 (2,468 records), 1906-1909 (1,049 records), have been translated, 1847-1876, 1877-1887, 1888-1895 still have to be translated.

    Marriages:  1818-1838, (399 records) 1902-1908 (430 records) translated.

    Deaths:  1818-1838 (588 records), 1900-1902 (421 records), 1903-1908 (1,444 records) translated, 1839-1858, 1862-1881, 1882-1890, 1891-1895 still have to be translated.

    The Hussenbach database continues to grow. I now have 33,360 names in the database. I appreciate all of the information fellow Hussenbachers have shared with me. I have found numerous times that the information from one person combined with another’s can be the connection that links that family back to the German immigrant ancestor.

    I continue to receive requests for information from the Hussenbach web page at: Hussenbach (Linevo Osero), the Facebook page at: Hussenbach (Linevo Osero) and Neu-Hussenbach (Gashon) Russia Descendants, and email. I had 326 emails concerning 33 different family lines and other general village information.

    Susan Hopp Nakaji
    Hussenbach Village Coordinator
    susan.nakaji@sbcglobal.net

     

  • 2012 Village Report

    For last year I got three requests for information about Johannestal and one request for an unknown village that I could not identify.  The Johannestal website remains hosted by the GRHS http://www.grhs.org/korners/heinle/johannestal.html

     

    Ray Heinle

    Gilbert, Arizona, USA

     

     

     

  • Josefstal / Schwabe Khutor, Saratov, Volga
    2012 Village Report

    I received about 5 requests for assistance, from Germany and Argentina.

     

    Other than that, I am currently working on getting excerpts from the 1897 census from the archives in Russia.

     

    They confirmed that they have the original returns for Josefstal.  I'd like to pursue getting the entire census for the village, but we will see what it costs.  Currently my requests to Saratov take 7 months to give an initial response, then a further 7 months to obtain what was ordered.

     

    I am slowly working on a English translation of our History of Josefstal book, going more slowly that I had hoped.

     

    My book on the History of the Gerk family was published this past July.

     

    That's about it!

     

    Edward (Ted) Gerk

  • Submitted by Beth Davenport,

    Village Coordinator, Database Coordinator, Webmaster.

     

    There has been a little activity for Jost in 2012. I have received inquiries for Arndt, Guetler, Hahn, Meisner and Wenig.  I've been able to help to make a few connections.  It was especially fun to hear from a young seeker who turned out to be a distant cousin; she helped me as much as I helped her, even exchanging family

    photographs across the continent.

     

    I continue to maintain the Jost website. The Jost Facebook page has received a few postings from the U S, Germany, Russia, and Argentina.

     

    I have uploaded the Jost database to a private ancestry family-tree file for further research.  As time permits, I'm attempting to update Jost family information with documentation found on ancestry.com.

     

    Jost currently has census records for 1767, 1798, 1834, 1850 and 1857.  Many original Jost families are listed in the Kuhlberg Reports.  Thanks to Dodie Rotherham we have recent photos of the village and Jost birth records from 1794 - 1811.  Unfortunately, Eagles Achieve will now only release information by specific family name.  In 2007, I purchased "All" Stier births in Jost and Warenberg, 1795 - 1863; there are  a few large gaps in the records.

     

    The Convention in Portland didn't bring any new information this year, but meeting with Kanton Kukkus descendants emphasizes how much the family branches extend over surrounding villages.

    BETH Mueller-Rohn DAVENPORT

     

    Jost (Popovkina) Village Coordinator

    http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~jost/


  • 2012 Village Report

     

    There were 10 requests for information from Argentina, Australia, Germany and Russia as well as the United States and Canada.

     

    The Australia request concerned ancestors in Canada.  Argentina  had questions about a particular ancestor in Russia.  Help is ongoing with many of the requests.

     

    The compiling of families is ongoing.  Passenger lists are noted on the family files as well as census information.. Many of the families have been traced back to the First Settler and a few to the Kuhlberg Lists.

     

    A number of requests related to other Volga villages have been helped in their ancestral research.

     

    Respectfully submitted,

    Rosemary Larson

    AHSGR VC Kamenka

    http://www.webbitt.com/volga/kamenka/

     

     

  • Katharinenstadt, Samara, Volga
    2012 Village Report

     

  • Kassel, Glückstal, Odessa, Kherson

 

  • Kautz, (Werschinka) Saratov, Volga
    2012 Village Report

    It has been a good year for Kautz research.  I processed 43 obituaries, many received from Henry Schmick, which matched against my Kautz database. As of today, the database now contains 27,961 individuals and 9,210 marriages. The software I use is Family Treemaker for Windows.  Earlier in the year I backed up the database with Elaine Frank Davison's husband's family, the Davisons, retained it for her 4 children, then methodically removed most of that family because they weren't directly Kautz related.  That is why the number of individuals and marriages is down from last year's report.  Likewise, though my wife has done a lot of research on her non-Volga genealogy, her family isn't shown in the Kautz database beyond her father.

    People with Kautz ties from the United States and Europe communicate with me and I am normally able to provide substantive information to them from their initial query. In many cases, I’m able to get additional information on their families. This is then entered into the Kautz database with citations.

    I donated Kautz-related materials from the estate of Elaine Frank Davison to the Center for Volga-German Studies at Concordia University in Portland.  I was able to attend the 2012 convention in Portland where I made up a Kautz tri-fold display.  I thought the venue for the convention was very good.  The programs I attended were all of excellent quality, including those by Maggie Hein and Jean Roth.  The German food, delivered by those who spoke only German rivaled the best German restaurants in the Portland area.  At one class, I learned to make Grebble with a couple dozen others.  My thanks to Brent Mai for his contributions in helping to organize the event.

    In 2012 I sent 23 DVD’s of Unsere Leute von Kautz (Our People from Kautz) to people with ancestral ties to Kautz. The DVD, about 445 mb, and 3,859 files, contains a wealth of information including family group charts, history, stories, maps, letters, recipes, group photographs, photographs of the remains of the village from 2007, descendant charts and genealogy charts for the primary surnames of the first settlers of Kautz, photocopies of Pleve charts for these major families, and many extracts of information from the Kautz database, converted to Excel then to HTML format. This DVD is basically a large Web Page detailing the 10 paper volumes of Unsere Leute von Kautz which Elaine published in her lifetime and the electronic volume I produced after her death in 2001. My volume, volume 9, is now 222 pages.

    Going through all the Frank family photographs I have, I scanned those of my father, David Frank, those of his six siblings and families, my grandparents Johann Conrad Frank and Maria Catharina Knaub, and great-grandparents.  All my Frank cousins received those photos and were very appreciative.  At some time, I'll organize all onto a DVD for distribution to those cousins and to my family.

    Due to the many Kautz-related families in Montana, I went through Find-A-Grave, individual by individual, and updated information in the large Laurel and Billings cemeteries with the information from my Kautz database.  Information from previous Find-A-Grave submissions filled in many blank dates for me.

    From deaths in Kautz, according to my database in Family Treemaker, I built a virtual Kautz cemetery in Find-A-Grave. It currently houses information on 3,498 individuals. It can be found at: http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=cr&CRid=2468678&CScn=kautz&.  There is a good write-up on the village with actual photos of some individuals who lived there.  Information includes birthdate, deathdate, parents, spouses, if known.  Already, I am getting positive feedback from individuals who like the information contained in the site.  There is a chance some individuals who died in Kautz may have been buried in neighboring villages.  As I find them, I will remove them from the virtual Kautz cemetery.

    From Google Earth, I was able to find many ground-based photos of the remains of Kautz and nearby villages, all taken from different positions and directions around Kautz by what appears to be a group of young Russian photographers walking the land.  It certainly gave me some perspective on the vastness of areas our ancestors inhabited.

    Thanks to Tanya Schell and Maggie Hein for the information on the Bogoslovlaga Labor Camp and its online index.  I was able to find many Kautzers who populated the camp, some dying there.  I updated my Kautz database accordingly.

    Thanks to Maggie Hein also for information on setting up Groups in Facebook.  I can now report that Kautz now has its own group at: http://www.facebook.com/#!/groups/425613657484126/.  In it you'll find a lot of information and group photos of families in Kautz.

    Michael Frank
    Village Coordinator for Kautz
    (Russian name Werschinka)

     

     
  • Klosterdorf, Swedish Colonies, Nikolaev and Kherson
    2012 Village Report

    The oldest colony of theSwedish Villages, Alt-Schwedendorf was formed in

    1782 with Swedes from an island off Estonia, now called Hiiumaa.  The German colonies included in the Swedish Villages group are Mühlhausendorf formed in 1805 and Klosterdorf and Schlangendorf formed in the 1806.  They are located in the Dneipr River, north of Berislav..  This group of colonies was renamed to its current name Zmiivka.

     

    I have had no inquiries for 2012.

     

    Karen Wright

    VC for Swedish Villages, Mühlhausendorf, Klosterdorf, Schlangendorf, Alt-Schwedendorf


  • Köhler, Saratov, Volga

    2012 Village Report
     

 

  • Kolb, Saratov, Volga

    2012 Village Report
     

    Submitted by Maggie Hein and Doris Evans

     

     In memory of our long-time Kolb co-VC Thelma Koch Sprenger, who passed away April 30, 2012. 

     

     Doris and I responded to more than 70 inquiries during 2012.  If a person's ancestors are in fact from Frank, we are generally able to provide them with a complete ancestral chart back at least to the First Settlers, if not several generations back into Germany.  Sometimes this is a simple matter of looking up an existing family in our database and exchanging a few e-mails, sometimes this requires hours of searching through untranslated records in an attempt to find a missing marriage or birth record, and an exchange of many e-mails. 

     

    Research inquiries come from a variety of sources.  The AHSGR office forwards new member information to us if the person fills out a genealogy chart and indicates Frank ancestry.  There are two Frank web sites, both of which receive queries, and a RootsWeb mailing list.  We have a Facebook page, which is becoming an increasingly important source of contact with Frank and Kolb descendants. And of course people find our e-mail addresses on the AHSGR web page and on various message boards. 

     

    We continue the slow but steady process of translating the records we have obtained from Russia.  As of today, the following Frank records have been

    translated: Births and Baptisms for 1839 - 1879, a total of 12,376 records; Engagements & Marriages for 1839 - 1852, a total of 643 records; and Deaths for 1839 - 1845, a total of 770 records.  Much of the material that we had in the Frank database prior to acquiring the church records came from Pleve charts and Pleve's census compilations, which we thought gave us a fairly good picture of Frank genealogy.  As we have worked our way through the translated records, we have discovered numerous individuals and events that are missing from the Pleve charts.  We are constantly adding records and correcting existing records in an effort to make the information we provide

    to Frank descendants as accurate as possible.  

     

    Translation of the Frank church records has also alerted us to errors in the published Frank census records.  We also encountered problems with the published Kolb census records when we acquired the 1850/1857 Kolb census records.  Unfortunately, I have been unable to obtain the materials that were provided to AHSGR when these census books were originally published.  I don't know if the errors originated with the extraction of the data from the Russian records, with the translation, or with the formatting of the books for publication.  Anyone acquiring either the Frank or Kolb census books or Frank or Kolb Pleve charts should be aware that they are incomplete and may

    contain errors.   

     

    Most of you are familiar with "Memory Books".  These are books published in Russia that list the individuals who were imprisoned in various Labor Camps after 1941.  The paperback books are printed in small quantities, so obtaining copies can be difficult.  Lucky for us, there are several Russian web sites where online indexes of some of the "Memory Books" are now available.  The Chelyabmetallurgstroy Labour Camp, Nischni Tagil Labour Camp, and the Bogoslovlaga Labour Camp all have searchable, online databases.  I have the paperback book version of the Bogoslovlaga database, and from that I knew that there were a significant number of people from the Frank area who were sent there.  Using the online version, I was able to create an Excel spreadsheet of the 2,274 individuals from Frank area villages who were imprisoned in Bogoslovlaga.  The Excel spreadsheet has links to the individual record pages on the web site so that a user can just click on a name on the spreadsheet to access the individual in the online database.  I distributed the spreadsheet to the other Frank area VCs and made it available on our Facebook page.

     

    After the Kulberg book came out, Doris and I prepared a table of all of the families listed in the Frank First Settlers List (FSL), along with a reference to where that family could be found in the Kulberg book and the Transport book. I gave this out as a handout at the 2011 convention, but I really didn't have a good way to distribute it to those who were not at the convention, short of individually e-mailing it.  As you know, we cannot attach files to posts on the RootsWeb mailing lists.  Those of you who use Facebook know that posting anything other than an image on a Facebook page is difficult.  Both problems can be solved by uploading the file to a cloud storage site, and then forwarding the link to your mailing list or posting in on your Facebook page.  I am using the free version of DropBox for this purpose, but there are many other companies that offer a similar service.  I have successfully done this with both the Frank FSL table and the list of the Frank area people who were sent to the Bogoslovlaga Labor Camp. 

     

    Because the Frank and Kolb records are now combined in the same database, Doris and I also spend a considerable amount of time processing the Kolb records.  This year's project has been a continuation of last year's census and draft records project.  Once all of the information from the 1850/1857 Kolb census was input into the database, we had a good starting point for the draftee records.  We have draftee lists for most years from 1884 - 1917.

    These represent records for men born in 1863 - 1896. So far the records for

    1884 - 1907 have been translated, a total of 825 records.  The draftee lists give the draftee's date of birth, his father's name, the household number in the 1857 census, and personal information about the draftee such as his marital status, religion, literacy, and profession.  In addition, some of the records give the father's age, the names and ages of the draftee's brothers, and the names and ages of the draftee's children (if any).

     

    As with the Frank church records, the translation is only the first step in the process.  As each year of records is translated, Doris and I compare the records to our existing data. In the case of Kolb, this is census records, Birth and Baptism records for 1873 - 1913, a total of 6,255 records, Marriage records for 1845 - 1907, a total of 1,525 records, and Death and Burial records for 1873 - 1911, a total of 3,516 records.  Unfortunately, the marriage records for Kolb (unlike Frank) are summary information only, giving only the names of the bride and groom, and sometimes not even giving their ages.  Using the census household number and the father's age, we can match each draftee with his ancestors in the 1850/1857 census.  In some cases older brothers who were born in the gap between 1857 and 1863 were listed.   Once we got to the 1894 list, we were able to begin matching the draftees to their birth records.  If the draftee is noted as being married, or having children, we can match these up with the marriage and birth records.  

     

    Thank you to Barry Heimbigner, Tanja Schell, and Judi Jarrett for translating the seemingly endless supply of records. 

     

    Thank you to our friends in Argentina for their willingness to share their research findings.  Special thanks to Patricia Gayol Windecker for sharing her collection of obituaries of people who were born in Frank.  I was able to match up many of the individuals that she identified as having been born in Frank with families that we have in the Frank database.  This will enable us to assist descendants in Argentina with future genealogy research. 

     

    We had an excellent turnout for Frank Canton meetings and events at the 2012 AHSGR Convention in Portland.  We had more than 60 people in our Village Area Group meeting, and we had about 75 people at the Frank Canton dinner arranged by Jean Roth.  I gave two presentations on basic Volga German Genealogy research, and Doris and I gave a presentation on connecting the various records for Kolb. 

     

     


  • Konstantinovka, Samara, Volga

    2012 Village Report

     

    Church records available for Alt-Schilling are at the Russian Archive in Engels as follows:  Births 1764-1841, 1842-1878, Register of the Lutheran

    congregation: 1865 - 1931, Family List: 1883, Homeowners list: 1910, 1915, and draft lists covering unknown periods of time.  The archives in Engels only sells reports created from information extracted from these records.

    Reports vary in cost from $200 to $1500 or more, depending on the time period covered and the number of people in the report.  Reports are in Microsoft Word document format, in Russian.

     

    Church records for the two Neu-Schilling villages located south of Krazny-Kut are at the Russian Archives in Saratov, and consist of birth records for 1871-1921, death records for 1901-1921, and a first settlers list. Church records for Konstantinovka are at the Russian Archives in Saratov, and consist of birth records for 1880-1919, death records for 1895-1910, and marriage records for 1895-1908. The archive will create reports and will copy some records for an individual, at $11 per record.

     

    During 2012, I received no information on any reports created by either of the Russian Archives.

     

    During 2012, I had 34 emails with people concerning people from Schilling, and their descendants.  The primary means of communication for things related to Schilling are through a Facebook page, the Schilling website: http://www.schillinggr.org/ , and the Schilling mailing list with instructions at:

    http://lists.rootsweb.ancestry.com/index/intl/RUS/RUS-SARATOV-DOBRINKA.html

     

    http://lists.rootsweb.ancestry.com/index/intl/RUS/RUS-SARATOV-SCHILLING.html

    I continue to receive inquiries from people in Germany and Russia who find me almost exclusively through the Schilling website.  Unfortunately, most people from these countries only have family information for people born in 1910 or later, making it impossible to connect to people 50 years before that time.

     

    During 2012, additions to the Schilling database included tracing families from other villages who married people from Schilling.  I have also added information from The Kulberg Lists (5 or 6 families), which is the only published source of first settler information.  I continue to do extensive research on the descendants of Schilling people who immigrated to the United States and Canada.

     

    Gary Martens

     VC for Schilling, Konstantinovka, Neu-Schilling I and Neu-Schilling II

 

  • Kraft, Saratov, Volga

     2012 Village Report

    Several years ago, we acquired copies of the Kraft Village church records.

    We found them of limited value because they appeared to be woefully incomplete. Ed Wagner suspects that it is our translation that is incomplete rather than the records themselves. He's volunteered to have them re-translated and we anxiously await the result.

     

    Our primary research challenge remains the difficulty in proving the link between immigrating ancestors and the 1857 census.

     

    This year, I exchanged 264 emails with 40 different individuals.

     

    Ron Burkett

     VC Kraft

     

  • Krasnojar, Samara, Volga
    2012 Village Report

    I received very few queries this last year and responded to them. I have been working with old contacts and have been updating and sharing some information with them. There were a few new members to AHSGR but I only received information from headquarters for one member.

     

    Respectfully submitted Susie Weber Hess

     

     
  • Kratzke, Saratov, Volga

    2012 Village Report

     

  • Kronental, North Caucasus

 

  • Kukkus, Samara, Volga

    2012 Village Report

    I have had very few requests for information from the Kukkus Village data base this year. At the Portland convention, two persons requested information. One was given her answers from another village coordinator and the other one I sent the requested information. 

    If you hear about any censuses in the 1890s, it would be a great help in putting together a lot of the immigrants to America families. There is a gap there in connecting those people to the proper lineage. 

    Thank you for volunteering for this position.

    Sincerely, Eleanor Sissell, Kukkus Village Coordinator.

     

  • Kulm, Bessarabia

 

  • Kutter

    2012 Village Report for Kutter

     

 

  • Laub, Samara, Volga
    2012 Village Report

    This has been a relatively busy year. There have been  Inquiries from the US, Argentina and Germany for Busch, Moerk/Morkel, Morasch, Hermann, Brick/Brueck, Wegele, Sommers, Forath/Vorath, Prelzers and Flach.  I have been able to assist some with research and also put them in contact with others researching the same families.

    Most of the inquiries have come through the Laub, Tarlyk, Russia Facebook page, www.facebook.com/pages/Laub-Tarlyk-Russia/157858047561725 or the German-Russia Connections page,  www.facebook.com/groups/182712025143981.  The Facebook pages draw people from around the world and are very popular with all age groups.  More and more information is becoming available.

    Two individuals from Argentina, whom I met through Facebook, have become new AHSGR members and Village coordinators.   They are very actively contributing to the organization and have found sources in Germany and Russia to assist with record mining.  A big thank you to both Jorge Bohn and Patricia Windecker for their willingness to get involved and share information!

    I continue to gather Laub family information but have not added all to my digital files.     Currently I have approximately 15 family trees – some complete but most incomplete.  Laub family trees are very connected to Jost, Lauwe, Straub, Stahl am Tarlyk, Dinkle and Warenburg. I maintain contact with Laub descendants via email and Facebook on a regular basis.

    I attended the AHSGR convention in Portland in June and hosted the Laub gathering – three people attended the gathering.  That makes two conventions in a row that Laub descendants attended!  A big deal for me! 

    I have now completed the research for some of my family connections; Flack, Reinhardt, Törmer, Büschel, Busch, Höffneider, back to their origins in Germany.   This information will be sent to AHSGR and available in the Laub, Tarlyk, Russia files.

    Plans for 2013 include purchasing, if possible, information for the period 1857-1920, completing research of other family lines, researching records in Germany, assisting Laub descendants with family research and digitizing some of the current Laub family trees.

    Dodie Reich Rotherham

     

     

     

  • Lauwe, Saratov, Volga
    2012 Village Report

    For 2012 I received four requests for information although one fellow was more interested in selling me information than getting it.  I did secure a photo of "downtown" Lauwe, circa 1930.  I am trying to make sure that I have permission to post this photo on the Lauwe website, http://www.grhs.org/korners/heinle/lauwe/lauwe.html

     

    Someone also sent me an electronic copy of "The Lauwe Lampe" Issue 9, Spring

    2002 that I did not know existed.  This has been posted on the Lauwe website.

     

    Ray Heinle

    Gilbert, Arizona, USA

     

     

  • Leichtling, Saratov, Volga

     

     

  • Leipzig, Bessarabia

 

  • Liebenthal, Volga

 

 

  • Lillienfeld, North Caucasus

 

  • Louis, Samara, Volga

    2012 Village Report

     

    Since I was still acting VC for the village of Louis for half of the year,  I will send in a report for my part.

     

    This yesr has been a bad year for me due to health problems, deaths in my family and cousins.  It was almost impossible for me to keep up. It was with heavy heart that I made the decision to resign my VC position.

     

    I did receive 62 inquiries and hopefully I responded to all of them to their satisfaction.  Many of my inquiries come from a relative who is heavily into research of the Volga Villages.

     

    I want to wish much luck to Denise  as she is the VC for Mariental; Kevin Rupp also, I think he has Louis, and he has taken over my web page and newsletter.

     

    I plan on selling my library of novels on e-bay.  However, my reference material is a problem for me.  Some are heavily used  and their condition isn't the best.  There are too many people who want different ones, that I have not made a decision on them.

     

    Thelma Mills - VC for Louis through May of 2012

     

     

  • Luzern,  Samara, Volga

 

  • Maienheim
    2012 Maienheim Village Report

     

     

     

  • Marienberg
    2012 Village Report

31/1/1858 CENSUS - GERMAN VERSION - Includes some fomilies from Schuck colony that are not included in 1857 AHSGR Census.

 

Added to the Database for the Village many films (all already scanned):

 

Translated:

 

1890, Death records - 1890 wurde in Marienberg und anderen Kolonien von Pfarrer Georg Saurer oder anderen Geistlichen, mit Empfang der heiligen Sakramente folgende Kirchenmittglieder beerdigt

 

1911 -  1911 in Marienberg wurde von Pfarrer Kappes Alois oder von Schulmeisterr F. Günther, mit Empfang der heiligen Sakramente folgende Kirchenmittglieder beerdigt.

 

1916 -   in Marienberg wurde von Pfarrer Kappes Alois oder von Kister Jakob Kreismann, mit Empfang der heiligen Sakramente folgende Kirchenmittglieder beerdigt.

 

1908 - Birth and Baptisms, childs names birth date, bapt. date, parent´s names and godfather´s names. You can find also some info about Marienberg at: www.marvolrus.blogspot.com

I began my term as Village Coordinator for Streckerau and Marienberg Colonies about middle 2012, and this months were enjoyable and active.

I have had fifteen inquiries for help in research during the eight months I have been the village coordinator. And were able to assist these individuals with their research by  either furnishing information directly, or referring them to another Village  Coordinator.

The database for both villages increases nearly on a daily basis. Records have been founded and translated.

For Marienberg, with 1857 census as reference, we are crossing all the data with the different villages of origins census. The actual database has about 1.800 surnames included, with confirmed records (period 1855-1916).

Though it has not been updated in the last weeks, we have a page www.marvolrus.blogspot.com active.

1897 census have been located, but the Russian archive authorities, to my request answered they only will provide information of individual records.

More records for both villages –different years- are being downloaded from Samara Archiv.  This task can be made “on line” and will be translated in the next few months.

I want to thank the valuable cooperation of all the VC´s for different villages.  That was of great help to my work.  Specially Angela Gartner, Cathy Hawinkels, Sherri Rose, Gary Martens, Jim Osborne, Maggie Hein, Rosemary Larson, Dodie Rotherham and specially Patricia Gayol Windecker. Also to Dennis Zitterfkopg for his help in my firsts contacts with AHSGR.

 

JORGE BOHN  Village Coordinator for Streckerau & Marienberg

 

  • Mariental, Samara, Volga

    2012 Village Report for Mariental

     

    Since I was still acting VC for the village of Mariental for half of the year,  I will send in a report for my part.

     

    This yesr has been a bad year for me due to health problems, deaths in my family and cousins.  It was almost impossible for me to keep up. It was with heavy heart that I made the decision to resign my VC position.

     

    I did receive 62 inquiries and hopefully I responded to all of them to their satisfaction.  Many of my inquiries come from a relative who is heavily into research of the Volga Villages.

     

    I want to wish much luck to Denise  as she is the VC for Mariental; Kevin Rupp also, I think he has Louis, and he has taken over my web page and newsletter.

     

    I plan on selling my library of novels on e-bay.  However, my reference material is a problem for me.  Some are heavily used  and their condition isn't the best.  There are too many people who want different ones, that I have not made a decision on them.

     

    Thelma Mills - VC for Mariental through May of 2012.

    *****************************************************************

    This past year Denise Grau and I assumed the role of Village Co- Coordinators for the village of Mariental (Volga) which was originally under the VC-ship of Thelma Mills.  While Denise was busy answering a number of e-mail on the village, which she will mention in her report, I converted the website that Thelma worked so hard to put on the internet over to my website. http://www.volgagerman.net/ Mariental.htm.  I continue adding to my Family Tree data base of over  90,000 names.  These names cover many of the upper Catholic colonies.  

    I subscribe to the magazine Volk Auf Dem Weg and monitor and new publications.  I was fortunate to get a copy of "Die Kolonie Mariental an der Wolga" written by Albert Obholz and published by Historischer Forschungsverin der Deutschen aus Russland.  The book is written in German and Russian and covers everything from first settlers to deportations and labor work camps.

     

    With Denise's help we were able to obtain death records from the LDS records.  These included 1879 and 1880.

     

    Kevin Rupp

    Co-Coordinator Mariental (Volga)

    krupp@ruraltel.net

    www.volgagerman.net

    www.germansfromrussia.net

     

     

  • Markosowka, North Caucasus

 

  • Messer, Saratov, Volga

    2012  Village Report

    I became the Messer Village Coordinator in July. I was unable to obtain a distribution list from the previous Village Coordinator, so my first task was to try to build one. I was able to get a short list of individuals interested in Messer from the VC Liaison, so I took this list and added everyone I could find in the last issue of Clues that listed Messer as one of their villages. In addition, I have added a few new names of people who have expressed an interest in Messer since July. I now have 25 email and 7 postal addresses on my list.

    In early August I sent out a note to everyone on my address list introducing myself as the new Messer Village Coordinator and listing information on the major sources of family information on Messer. I received six responses asking various questions and I hope I was able to help these researchers move forward.

    In November I sent out a Messer Newsletter and received seven responses asking questions, or making suggestions for future newsletters. A copy of the translation of the Messer entries from the Pleve Russian Passport List was included in the Newsletter.

    I have also received two requests for information not related to either of the notes above.

    I created a reference sheet showing which family names are included in the various Messer documents. I have shared that with those on my distribution list and sent a copy to Lincoln for the Village File. The AHSGR Librarian sent me a file with the names of all the people in the AHSGR database with Messer as a place of residence. I have loaded this file into Family Tree Maker and I hope it will help me to provide better answers to future questions.

    Mike Meisinger

 

  • Molotschna Settlement
    2012 Village Report

I began my term as Village Coordinator for the Molotschna Settlement Colonies this past summer.  Attached you will find a full listing of the 60 villages and estates that were part of the Molotschna Settlement, established in 1804.  I attended the 2012 AHSGR Convention at Concordia University at Portland, OR, where I convened the Mennonite Researchers'

Roundtable on Saturday, with about ten attendees participating.

Additionally, I gave a presentation on Early Immigrant Mennonite Settlements in Central Kansas:  The Making of the Wheat State. .

 

I avidly harvest obituaries from all local newspapers, as central Kansas has a large population of Mennonite descendants from the Molotschna Colonies.

The obituaries are posted and then sent to Colorado to be included in SOAR.

This has been a habit of mine for many years, since I joined AHSGR, and my data base includes thousands of obituaries.  I include Lutheran and Catholic obits when I am sure they are of German Russian heritage.  I also selectively harvest "Life Events" from local newspapers. 

 

There have been about six inquiries for help in research during the eight months I have been the village coordinator.  There are a number of tools that are available that can be helpful for people researching this area of Mennonite settlements, one of the most important being the 1835 Molotschna

Colonies Census.  A copy of the census is available at the AHSGR library.  

 

Molotschna Settlement Villages - located in province of Taurida, Russia

 

On the Molochnaya River - second and largest Mennonite settlement

 

This second settlement of Mennonites began in 1803 when Elder Cornelius Warketin of Rosenort, who was born in Russia in 1798 in the Chortitza Settlement, corresponded with Kontenius and found there was land available for several thousand families on the Molochnaya River (near the Dniepr River).  A total of 365 families traveled to the Molotschna are from 1803-1806.  In 1819-1820, another 254 families went to Molotschna.  The migration came to a close in 1835, with a total of 1,200 families, and an estimated population of 6,000.  A few of the families from these villages, of which I am aware, are listed after founding date:

 

Halbstadt                    Founded 1804

 

Neu-Halbstadt                           1804

 

Muntau                                      1804 - Suderman, Penner

 

Schoenau                                    1804

 

Fischau                                       1804

 

Lindenau                                    1804 - Loewen

 

Blumstein                                   1804

 

Muensterberg                            1804 - Wall

 

Altonau                                      1804 - Wiens, Warkentin

 

Ladekopp                   Founded 1805 - Suderman

 

Schoensee                                   1805

 

Petershagen                               1805

 

Tiegenhagen                              1805

 

Ohrloff                                       1805 - Cornies, Suderman

 

Tiege                                           1805

 

Blumenort                                  1805

 

Rosenort                                     1805

 

Fuerstenau                 Founded 1806

 

Rueckenau                 Founded 1811

 

Margenau                  Founded 1819

 

Lichtfelde                                   1819

 

Neukirch                                    1819

 

Alexandertal              Founded 1820

 

Schardau                                    1820 - Penner

 

Pordenau                                   1820 - Penner, Suderman

 

Mariental                                   1820

 

Rudnerweide                             1820

 

Grossweide                                1820

 

Franztal                                      1820

 

Pastwa                                        1820

 

Fuerstenwerder         Founded 1821

 

Alexanderwohl                          1821 - Schmidt

 

Gnadenheim                              1821

 

Tiegerweide               Founded 1822

 

Liebenau                    Founded 1823

 

Elisabethtal                                1823

 

Wernersdorf              Founded 1824

 

Friedensdorf                              1824

 

Prangenau                                 1824

 

Konteniusfeld            Founded 1832

 

Gnadenfeld                Founded 1835

 

Waldheim                   Founded 1836 - Loewen

 

Sparrau                      Founded 1838

 

Landskrone               Founded 1839

 

Hierschau                   Founded 1848

 

Nikolaidorf                Founded 1851

 

Paulsheim                   Founded 1852

 

Kleefeld                      Founded 1854

 

Alexanderkrone        Founded 1857 - Dyck

 

Mariawohl                                 1857

 

Friedensruh               Founded 1857

 

Steinfeld                                     1857

 

Gnadental                  Founded 1862

 

Hamburg                    Founded 1863

 

Klippenfeld                                1863

 

Fabrikerwiese                            1863

 

 Estates or Hamlets:

 

Felsental                     Founded 1820

 

Yushanlee                  Founded 1822

 

Steinbach                   Founded 1812

 

 Molotschna Daughter Settlements

 

Crimea                       Taurida - est 1862 - 25 villages

 

Kuban                        Kuban district - est 1863 - 2 villages

 

Brazol (Schoenfeld)   Ekaterinoslav - est 1868 - 4 villages

 

Zagradovka               Kherson - est 1871 - 16 villages

 

Auli Ata                      Turkestan - est 1880 - 4 villages

 

Memrik                      Ekaterinoslav - est 1885 - 10 villages

 

Neu-Samara               Samara - est 1890 - 12 villages

 

Davlekanovo              Ufa - est 1894 - scattered villages

 

Orenburg                   Orenburg - est 1894  - 8 villages

 

Suvorovka                  Stavropol - est 1894 - 4 villages

 

Olgino                         Olgino - est 1895 - 2 villages

 

Terek                          Caucasus - est 1901 - 15 villages

 

 

Karen Suderman Penner

  • Moor, Saratov, Volga

    2012 Village Report

     

    2012 was an active year for the Moor Colony researchers.  After a lapse of three years, we were able to issue a newsletter.  By the return of undelivered newsletters, we lost a few of our members, but also gained new Moor researchers.

     

    Attended the Portland Convention.  The number of Moor attendees was somewhat higher than at past conventions, and we were able to meet some researchers who we had only known through correspondence.  The convention offered numerous extremely interesting and useful sessions, and Brent Mai’s extensive library provided new clues. Assisted Dick Kraus in trying to get others to help with the German Origins Project.

    Although the session was well attended, there has been little follow-up response.

     

    Volume 2 of our ongoing series of ancestral connections in Germany is now complete and in the last stages of review.  Two previously unlisted marriages and five baptisms are listed in the Moor section. As soon as the entries are reviewed, the information will be sent to Dick Kraus for the German Origins Project.

     

    Discovering one website and one book provided clues to the relatively unknown Danish colonies that preceded the trek to Russia.  The release of the Eichhorn book last Summer provided additional clues to our ancestral homes.  No less than five founding families are listed in this volume. The Danish records results will be released in Volume 3 of our series. If your village has any Kurpfalz First Settlers, you MUST get hold of a copy of the Eichhorn publication before it goes out of print.

     

    Queries were received from Russia, Germany, and the United States.  We were able to help many of these researchers, but the gap in information after 1857 still poses a problem for most.

     

    2013 is looking to be another good year.  Talks are planned for February and April, and perhaps even at the convention.  We are hoping to release Volume 3 sometime this year. Newsletters are also planned.

     

    W H Bonner


  • Mueller and Eckheim, Saratov, Volga
    2012 Village Report

    I am combining the reports for these villages, because there were no inquiries at all for Müller, and although I had inquiries for Eckheim, I was unable to help the majority, as they requested information from the years after 1858.

     

    The last census I have is 1858, and although I know there was a great deal of activity in Eckheim after that, (after all, my own father was born there in 1892), I don’t have the records.   I know they do exist, but I am trying to get by on my retirement benefit and Social Security, which will not allow me to make any extra purchases.  If the Eckheimers out there are willing to pool their money to obtain more records, please contact me.  I simply cannot do it on my own.

     

    Suzanne Heinitz-Dodge

     VC for Eckheim, Holstein, & Müller

     eckheimvc@gmail.com

     AHSGR VC for Eckheim, Holstein, & Müller (Mueller)


  • Mühlhausendorf, Klosterdorf, Schlangendorf, Alt-Schwedendorf
    2012 Village Report

    The oldest colony of theSwedish Villages, Alt-Schwedendorf was formed in

    1782 with Swedes from an island off Estonia, now called Hiiumaa.  The German colonies included in the Swedish Villages group are Mühlhausendorf formed in 1805 and Klosterdorf and Schlangendorf formed in the 1806.  They are located in the Dneipr River, north of Berislav..  This group of colonies was renamed to its current name Zmiivka.

     

    I have had no inquiries for 2012.

     

    Karen Wright

    VC for Swedish Villages, Mühlhausendorf, Klosterdorf, Schlangendorf, Alt-Schwedendorf

     

  •  

  • Neu-Galka, Samara, Volga

    2012 Village Report

    The following 2012 Surnames inquires were researched  for ancestry connections: Bernhardt, Simon , Dahlinger

    The following 2012 Surnames were researched  for ancestry connections: Albrecht Brunner Dahlinger Diehl Dienes Elsasser Fischer Fuchs Hanschu Haas Hoffman Jost Langhofer Riffel Ruff Schneider Sinner Wagner Weimer Ziegler 

    Surnames for Neu-Galka: Albrecht Bauer Beichel Berg Bernhardt Borger Brunner Buchhammer Dahlinger Diehl Dienes Elsasser Fischer Frank Fuchs Hanschu Haas Hoffman Geier Jost Kloss  Kandelin Klass Kock Koerbs (Kerbs) Kretz Langhofer  Lattner Martin  Meier Riffel Ruff Schwab Schneider Schantzebach Schick Schimpf Schmidt Schenk Sinner Simon Steinbach  Stuertz Veit Wagner Weimer  Weisheim Wiesner Ziegler  The source list of these Village surnames was the 1857 Census from Brent Mai received in the early part of 2010.

    Neu-Galka was founded in 1860 by Lutheran colonists resettling from Galka and Dobrinka. There were about 630 people who resettled in Neu Galka, with about 20 from Dobrinka and the remainder from Galka. Surnames of people that moved to Neu-Galka were Riffel, Weimer, Hanschu, Langhofer, Wagner, Dahlinger, Brunner, Haas, Hoffman, Bernhardt, Schmidt, Dienes and Ruff. After the deportation of 1941, the area occupied by the former village was absorbed into the nearby Russian town of Pallasovka and is today a neighborhood of Pallasovka.  

    Villages in the Lower Volga region were given a fixed amount of land, as described in the History section. Land was divided, and re-divided periodically, among the households and families in the village. By the time the 1850's were reached, the amount of land for each family was so small that families could not grow enough crops to both use as food and sell for income.

    The solution was to found new villages, called daughter colonies, in parts of the Lower Volga region were no villages existed. Most of these villages were on the east side of the Volga River

    With all of the startup activity in establishing a source of information on the villages; I have not been able to post to a standard website. 

    Leland Riffel
    Village Coordinator for Frankreich, Neu-Galka, Strassburg, Neu-Weimar, Alt-Weimar, & Weimar Villages

    •  

    • Neudorf, Glückstal, Odessa, South Russia

     

    • Neu-Moor, Saratov, Volga

      2012 Village Report

       

      Neu-Moor (Russian name Pogranichnyy), was a "grand-daughter" colony, formed in the 1920's by people living in the "mother" colony of Moor. 

      It was located in the Balzer District on the Bergseite (west or hilly

      side) of the Volga River, and was approximately 30 - 40 miles from the "mother" colony of Moor.

       

      Very little information is available on Neu-Moor.  I have had no inquiries for 2012.  So far there has been only one person seeking information on this colony.

       

      Irma A. Waggoner, V.C.

      iawagg@earthlink.net

       


    • Neu-OberMonjou, Samara, Volga, Russia

       

    • Neu-Norka

      2012 Village Report

       

      I have about 40 years of research in my data bank with a little over 7000 names and most of that is with my research into the Neu-Norka village.  I started with the 65 family names in the 1857 Neu-Norka Mai census and have been working backwards to their arrival in Norka in 1767.  I have about

      $10000 invested in materials and time and I known people have more than that invested I'm just trying to make a point how things add up.  So what I do is ask the people if they are willing to pay for the reproducing of my research for them and postage, and I have never been turn down, mainly because they were happy with the results and  information that I gave them.  I also let the people know I'm not in this to make money I just love what I'm doing.

      I'm still looking for my Grandpa Schwartz b/ about 1860.  On my mothers side I go back to 1712.

       

      Which brings me to my annual report, I have had three request, one which turned out to be her 4th great grandfather was the brother to the father-in-law of my 3rd grand uncle.  Try figuring that one out.  To make along story short I have traced 14 of the 65 families in the 1857 Neu-Norka back 1767 and as far back as 1700 Germany and Austria.  As you can believe it that 90% of them I'm related.  There are only 50 female first names used, most popular Katharina & Elisabeth.  About 30 male names used, most popular Johannes, Johann, Georg, Conrad, Friedrich, Heinrich & Ludwig.  The name Katharina is used about four thousand times and maybe 3 times in the same family.

       

      Well that’s all for now, God bless America, we are going to need his blessing and help this year more than ever and the years to come.  Have a Happy New Year.

       

      Neu-Norka Village  VC

      Marvin L. Schwartz

      PO BOX 603

      Fortuna, CA 95540

     

    • Neu-Schilling I and Neu-Schilling II, Konstantinovka
      2012 Village Report

      Church records available for Alt-Schilling are at the Russian Archive in Engels as follows:  Births 1764-1841, 1842-1878, Register of the Lutheran

      congregation: 1865 - 1931, Family List: 1883, Homeowners list: 1910, 1915, and draft lists covering unknown periods of time.  The archives in Engels only sells reports created from information extracted from these records.

      Reports vary in cost from $200 to $1500 or more, depending on the time period covered and the number of people in the report.  Reports are in Microsoft Word document format, in Russian.

       

      Church records for the two Neu-Schilling villages located south of Krazny-Kut are at the Russian Archives in Saratov, and consist of birth records for 1871-1921, death records for 1901-1921, and a first settlers list. Church records for Konstantinovka are at the Russian Archives in Saratov, and consist of birth records for 1880-1919, death records for 1895-1910, and marriage records for 1895-1908. The archive will create reports and will copy some records for an individual, at $11 per record.

       

      During 2012, I received no information on any reports created by either of the Russian Archives.

       

      During 2012, I had 34 emails with people concerning people from Schilling, and their descendants.  The primary means of communication for things related to Schilling are through a Facebook page, the Schilling website: http://www.schillinggr.org/ , and the Schilling mailing list with instructions at:

      http://lists.rootsweb.ancestry.com/index/intl/RUS/RUS-SARATOV-DOBRINKA.html

       

      http://lists.rootsweb.ancestry.com/index/intl/RUS/RUS-SARATOV-SCHILLING.html

      I continue to receive inquiries from people in Germany and Russia who find me almost exclusively through the Schilling website.  Unfortunately, most people from these countries only have family information for people born in 1910 or later, making it impossible to connect to people 50 years before that time.

       

      During 2012, additions to the Schilling database included tracing families from other villages who married people from Schilling.  I have also added information from The Kulberg Lists (5 or 6 families), which is the only published source of first settler information.  I continue to do extensive research on the descendants of Schilling people who immigrated to the United States and Canada.

       

      Gary Martens

       VC for Schilling, Konstantinovka, Neu-Schilling I and Neu-Schilling II

     

    • Neu-Schoenfeld
      2012 Village Report

       

      Neu Schoenfeld must have been settled mostly by folks from  Schoenfeld. 

      Schoenfeld was some 65 mi.SE of Saratov.  New Schoenfeld  was some 30 mi.SE of there.  I have never met or been contacted by someone  by New Schoenfeld n my 50 years of being the Village Coordinator for Pobochnoye  and Schoenfeld.

       

      There has been no activity in the New Schoenfeld file tis year.

       

      Larin Wilhelm

      V.C. for New Schoenfeld

       


    • Neu-Straub, Saratov, Volga

      2012 Village Report
       

      Neu-Straub seems to be a 'lost, forgotten' village, I have not been contacted by anyone this past year from this village. I know there are some families/persons from this village but they are more intent on researching other family names in other villages.

       

      I have information on other names and villages and have helped several persons find information on their family name. I have loaned some of my books to new members of our Chapter to further their knowledge of our heirtage and in some instances, they have found information to add to their family history. This has created interest, not only to further their interest in doing more research but also interest in our local Chapter.

       

      Neu-Straub researchers, please. let send me your name and family you are researching!

       

      Lillian Larwig - VC

    Neu-Weimar, Samara, Volga

    2012 Village Report

     

    No church records have been found for the daughter colony of Neu-Weimar.

    There is an 1857 census or founders list for people that originally settled in Neu-Weimar, starting in 1861.  These people came from Galka, Stephan, Schwab and Dobrinka.

     

     During 2012, I had 6 emails with people concerning people from Neu-Weimar.

     

    Gary Martens

     Neu-Weimar VC

    The following 2012 Surnames were researched  for ancestry connections: Breyer Brunner Diehl Dieterle Erbes Ernst Frank Gerlach Heinrich Herbel Rau Riel Rusch Schimpf Schlotthauer Schmunk Vogel Weimer Wolf 


    Surnames for Neu-Weimer: Abich Bathauer Bischoff Brauer Breyer Brunner Deisner Diehl Dieterle Eichmann Erbes Ernst Flath Frank Fritzler Gerlach Graff Grohs Hefele Heinrich Herbel Kahl Klauser Kretz Krispins Lotz Martin Meier Müller Neuwirt Nuss Peil Peter Rau Riel Rusch Schimpf Schlotthauer Schmidt Schmunk Schön Seifert Siebenlist Siegfried Simon Taudt Traudt Utz Vogel Weber Weimer Wilhelm Wolf Würtz  The source list of these Village surnames was the 1857 Census from Brent Mai received in the early part of 2010.


    Neu-Weimar was founded in 1861 as a Lutheran colony by colonists who relocated to Neu-Weimar came from Galka, Stephan, Schwab and Dobrinka.

    Villages in the Lower Volga region were given a fixed amount of land, as described in the History section. Land was divided, and re-divided periodically, among the households and families in the village. By the time the 1850's were reached, the amount of land for each family was so small that families could not grow enough crops to both use as food and sell for income.

    The solution was to found new villages, called daughter colonies, in parts of the Lower Volga region were no villages existed. Most of these villages were on the east side of the Volga River.

    With all of the startup activity in establishing a source of information on the villages; I have not been able to post to a standard website.  

    Leland Riffel

    Village Coordinator for Frankreich, Neu-Galka, Strassburg, Neu-Weimar, Alt-Weimar, & Weimar Villages

     

  • Neu-Yagodnaya, Samara, Volga

    2012 Village Report

     

    Neu Yagodnaya or Neu Yakada was settled in 1855 by farmers from Yagodnaya Polyana.

    The location was some 70 mi.E of Sarataov

     

    There has been no activity this year in these files.

     

    Laurin Wilhelm

    V.C. for Neu Yagodnaya

     

     

  • Nieder-Monjou, Samara, Volga

    2012 Village Report

     

    It was an exciting year for us as VC's for Nieder-Monjou.  During the past year we responded to a record 14 queries concerning Nieder-Monjou surnames.

     

    Mike attended the 2012 AHSGR Convention in Portland.  In addition to attending convention events he met with Wiesenseite VCs, Tim Weeder (Paulskoye), and Don Zochert (Fischer), David Schmidt (Boaro, Caesarsfeld, Stahl am Karaman), Jim Parsonage (Schaffhausen), and Denise Grau (Schoenchen).

     

    Nieder-Monjou AHSGR Village Coordinators Michael Grau and Steven Grau

     

     

     

  • Norka
    2012 Village Report

    Prepared by: Steve Schreiber, Norka Village Coordinator for AHSGR and Norka Webmaster
    steven.schreiber@gmail.com

    Judy Curtis, Norka Database Coordinator
    norka.judy.curtis@gmail.com

    Jerry Krieger, Norka Newsletter Editor and Publisher
    norkanews@gmail.com

    Louis Schleuger, Norka Census Records Coordinator
    ohashi70@gmail.com

    Our primary goals are to document the history of Norka and assist those who are researching their families from this colony. In 2012, the Norka team completed a significant amount of work and this report highlights some of the key accomplishments.

     

    Norka Outreach

     A Norka Facebook page was established late in 2011. The purpose of this page is to serve as a social media forum for people researching their ancestors from Norka, Russia and to serve as a repository for genealogy, stories, history and photographs related to this German colony in Russia. Currently there are 167 people from the USA, Canada, Germany, Russia and Argentina who have joined the Norka Facebook page and the number continues to increase on a weekly basis.

     http://www.facebook.com/norka.russia

    On June 16th, Steve Schreiber made a presentation titled “The History of Norka” at the 2012 AHSGR Convention in Portland. The presentation was well attended and the evaluations from AHSGR were very positive.  A “Norka Reunion” was held the evening of June 16th and was also well very attended.

    Plans for a “Norka Day” at the Center for Volga German Studies at Concordia University in Portland are underway. The event is tentatively scheduled for Saturday, August 17, 2013. More details will be available in early 2013 on the Norka and CVGS websites.

    Many new pages were added to the Norka website this year. There are currently 252 pages of information and 376 images on the site. The Volga Germans in Portland website also continues to expand and contains a great deal of information about families from Norka that settled in this area.

    http://www.volgagermans.net/norka/

    http://www.volgagermans.net/portland/

    Norka Database Project

    The Norka Database Project continues to grow as more Norka descendants contact us and request assistance in finding their ancestors.  Norka Project items are stored on a CD that is updated annually to coincide with the annual AHSGR convention.  The Norka CD is not freely distributed or available to purchase; it is only available at AHSGR headquarters in Lincoln, NE and at the several AHSGR chapters (Portland, OR; Denver, CO and Fresno, CA) large enough to have computers available for researchers to use.  If you are unable to travel to one of these AHSGR chapter libraries, you can request information regarding your Norka ancestral family members by contacting Judy Curtis (e-mail: norka.judy.curtis@gmail.com) or Louis Schleuger (e-mail: ohashi70@gmail.com) for look-ups in the Norka database and in Norka census records.

    The Norka Database contains over 31,700 individuals and is a merged collection of Norka Pleve surname charts, some Norka census records and “connecting link” genealogy information provided by many Norka descendants on the generations of their Norka ancestors who extend forward from where both the Norka census records and Norka Pleve surname charts end.

    The Norka 2012 Convention Handouts are available by sending an e-mail request to Judy Curtis.

    Norka Village Inventory File @ AHSGR

    Norka Surname Charts on AHSGR Website

    Norka Surnames – Preferred Spelling and Variations

    Norka - What’s Available for Researchers

    If anyone has items to add to our Norka CD, please send copies (you keep the originals) either electronically as an attachment to an e-mail to Judy Curtis at norka.judy.curtis@gmail.com or by snail mail to Judy Curtis, 9026 S. Dateland Dr., Tempe, AZ 85284.  Remember, this is a way to share with others as well as to preserve what you have.

    Norka Newsletter

    2012 marks the end of the seventeenth year of the publication of the “Norka Newsletter”. The Norka Newsletter is a quarterly publication, and is mailed to subscribers in February, May, August and November. Each issue of the 8-page publication includes articles on life in Norka, genealogical data, and the stories of men, women, and families who left Russia, crossed the Atlantic, and built a new life in North and South America and Canada. For a sample copy of the Norka Newsletter, contact Jerry Krieger at norkanews@gmail.com.

    Norka Census Records

    Preliminary work is underway to cross reference the Norka colonists listed in the 1767 Census published by Igor Pleve in his book “Einwanderung in das Wolgagebiet 1764-1767, Band 3” and the “Lists of Colonists to Russia in 1766 – Reports of Ivan Kuhlberg” also published by Igor Pleve.  We expect to complete this project in 2013.

    In our continuing efforts of comparing Norka’s censuses information and the various family surname charts researched by Dr. Igor Pleve listed in the Norka database, additional errors were noted on Dr. Pleve’s charts and within the censuses which resulted in more corrections and linkages of family members and updated notes were made to Norka’s censuses databases.

    The 1857 Census of Neu-Norka was entered into a Personal Ancestral File (PAF) database with notes which include a cross reference to the corresponding Household in the 1857 Census of Norka.  Based on the 1857 Censuses of Norka and Neu-Norka a spreadsheet was generated that cross-references those families that moved from Norka to Neu-Norka.

    The cross referencing all of the families listed in Norka’s 1767-1857 Censuses is progressing slowly, but well.  In this cross-referencing effort errors were noted on Dr. Pleve’s charts listed in the Norka Database and within the censuses concerning family members’ marriages, number of children and their linkages with other families.  Part of the linkage effort, includes the linage of females when they married since Dr. Pleve did not include that linage on his charts.  The research by many other Norka descendants is being included in this effort, which results in a much more complete family chart from 1767 to the current year.  The Hinkel and Urbach databases are still work in progress. 

     

  • North Caucasus

     
  • 2012 Village Report

    It was a slow year for Oberdorf, I received 2 inquires in 2012. I was only able to provide minimal information due to the information requested.

    Gene Sigward

    Ober-Monjou, Samara, Volga

    2012 Village Report

    2012 was sort of a quiet year for Obermunjou in requests and in obtaining information.  The majority of the birth and marriages before 1875 are available at the Saratov Archives and are not accessible as those records for some other village from Volgograd, so acquisition of such records are very slow.  

    At the present time I have a website, http://www.volgagerman.net/Obermunjou.htm, where I post what I have in my current files.  At this time I have:

    1. Einwanderung in das Wolgagebiet – Obermunjor 1767 census (First Settlers List)
    2. 1798 Census
    3. Births (Not Complete)
      1. 1821 – 1826
      2. 1827 – 1835
      3. 1849 – 1855
      4. 1866 – 1918
    1. Marriages
      1. 1839
      2. 1840
      3. 1850 – 1858
      4. 1860 – 1863
      5. 1876 – 1911
    1. Death Records (Not Complete)
      1. 1850 – 1855
      2. 1856 – 1876
      3. 1890 – 1906
      4. 1907 - 1918
    1. 1834 Census (Not Complete)
    2. 1850 Census
    3. 1857 Census

    I have collected a number of Obermunjou genealogies from researchers in Germany.  These include: Dechant, Fischer, Krapp and Hertel.       

    I have started a photo file of Obermunjor, but don’t have too many photos at this time.

    I have a collection of correspondence that people have given me, and letters taken from the local paper.

    My database is currently about 90,000 containing a number of families who originated from Obermunjour and settled in Ellis County, Kansas and well as a number of other Catholic Volga German Colonies connected to Ellis County, Kansas. 

    • Odessa, Odessa, South Russia

       

       
    • Old Swedish Villages

       

    • Orlovskoye, Samara, Volga

     

    •  2012 Village Report
       

      This year I had one follow-up from an old contact and I  received one new inquiry which turned out to be quite fruitful.  Irma Merkel Bykova of Wuppertal, Germany has shared her family  genealogy including many old family photos as well as current  photos of Paulskoye, Fischer, Engels and Marx. She has  also provided valuable information about specific Russian villages where many  Paulskoyer were let off the deportation train of 1941. Her  surnames of main interest: Merkel, Walter, Grune, Dorn. She has been actively interviewing elderly Volga Germans residing in Germany who had once lived in Paulskoye and sharing this historical information with me. I am grateful for her dedication to the preservation effort!

       

      This year I obtained, with the invaluable help of Dr. Mila  Koretnikova, many contemporary (i.e. 1900s) archival records from Saratov  and Engel Archives concerning surname WEDE. In doing so I of course added  a host of differently surnamed persons to my database such as marriage  partners and mother's maiden names.

       

      Along this vein I advise other VCs to always  keep searching for what archival records exist for your given village. For  example visit http://www.wolgadeutsche.net/  within its  "Forum" section, under "Genealogy", click on "Search the Volga German  Settlements". There you will find a Mother Colony section and a Daughter Colony  section, where you can find your village and then click on  "Documents". For most villages Dr. Pleve has listed the records held by  the Saratov Archive and you may be lucky to find where another contributor has listed what is held by still another  archive.  Interestingly, once I engaged Mila Koretnikova  her inquiry at Saratov Archives produced a different result which taken  together gave me a more complete idea of its holdings.

       

      In 2011 Pleve listed for Paulskoye: births (1798-1833,  1867-1885, 1895-1921), marriages (1798-1831, 1903-1920), and deaths (1798-1857,  1866-1922).

      Census records include: 1798, 1834 and 1850.

       

      Mila Koretnikova's 2012 inquiry at Saratov Archive found  births (1798-1857, 1867-1885, 1895-1921), marriages (1903-1920), and deaths  (1866-1922). 

      Census records: 1834.

       

      Finally, I'd like to report the holdings for Paulskoye at  Engels Archive per Mila Koretnikova: list of first settlers, 1767; census  (1857), and family lists (1873, 1874, 1882, 1920 with ages given).  The Samara Archive holds the 1850 and 1857 census records.

       

      Last, and definitely not least, I attended the AHSGR  Convention in Portland back in June. I really enjoyed it for its reinvigorating  effect and for the fellowship of really wonderful people who I'd never had a  chance to meet in person or hadn't been with in a long, long time.

       

      Respectfully submitted,

      Tim Weeder

      Village Coordinator,  Paulskoye

       

       

       

       

    • Pfeifer, Saratov, Volga

      2012 Village Report

       

      There were 14 requests for information from Argentina, Germany and Russia as well as the United States and Canada.  Many requests are ongoing.

       

      The compiling of families is ongoing.  Passenger lists are noted on the family files as well as census information.. Many of the families have been traced back to the First Settler, Transport and Kuhlberg Lists.

       

      A number of requests for other villages have been helped in their ancestral research.

       

      Respectfully submitted,

      Rosemary Larson

      AHSGR VC Pfeifer

 

  • Pobochnoye, Saratov, Volga

    2012 Village Report


    Pobochnoye was perhaps the last "Mother Colony" to be founded  on the Volga.  It was founded in 1772 some 40 miles northwest of Saratov, by a  group of 29 families from Darmstadt, Geremany.

     

    During the year I received inquiries from people who were researching Herdt, Knack, Ruuy, Schlegel, Schneider, Seitz, Stieben, Wagmer. Wilhelm and Wittig

     

    The unavailability of the 1857 census (revision list) does not help matters.  I do have the lists of names of people who left Pobochnoye in  1855-57 to settle in new villages, i.e. Schoendorrf, Schoenfeld, Schoental,  and Neu Jagoda.

     

     

    We miss our friend, cousin, and fellow researcher Kenny Stugart  who passed away in February.  His great accumulation of genealogy  information remains locked up in his computer.

     

    Laurin Wilhelm

    Village Coordinator for Pobochnoye

     

     

     

  • Polish Volhynia
     2012 Village Report

    There were no inquiries for Polish Volhynia in 2012.  I attended the 2012 AHSGR Convention in Portland, Oregon and coordinated the Polish Volhynia area meeting.  A total fo 12 persons attended of which a large number were researching Mennonites in Volhynia.

    Others included beginning and advanced researchers.  I also met with a new researcher on a one to one basis.  Information in the Polish Volhynian Heritage Hall binder was updated.  In August I attended the annual SGGEE Convention in Regina where my AHSGR Polish Volhynian resource information was displayed.

     

    Respectfully submitted,

    Mabel Kiessling 

     

  • Pruess

    2012 Village Report

     

     

     

                       

     

  • Reinhard(t), Samara, Volga

 

  • Reinwald, Samara, Volga
    2012 Village Report

    I received very few queries this last year and responded to them. I have been working with old contacts and have been updating and sharing some information with them.

     

    Respectfully submitted Susie Weber Hess

     

     

  • Rohleder, Samara, Volga

     

  • Rohrbach, Berezan, Odessa, Kherson

     

     

  • Rosenberg / Umet, Saratov, Volga

     2012 Village Report

    There is very little to report this year. No new material has been sent to me for the village but the website at http://rosenbergvillage.org/Default.htm remains active and viewed by relatives of those who lived there. Occasionally, as indeed this year, I receive enquiries which seek information about families who do not appear in the village lists. Usually this is because there exists at least one other village of the same name in the former Russian Empire (probably in the Crimea).

    There were 7 enquiries this year for the information about the following families: Schiebelhut, Dahlinger, Grauberger, Wollert, Kuxhausen (enquirer from Germany), Herber (with GEDCOM link provided), Weber, Stricker and my own family the Majors.

    Since Rosenberg was a daughter colony founded only in 1852 I often direct enquirers to the original colonies and their village co-ordinators. The only comprehensive and detailed material for Rosenberg is the 1857 census which I acquired some years ago and which is now administered through Brent Mai.  The Schiebelhuts in Rosenberg came from Kutter, the Dahlinger family requested was from Galka, and the Majors from Grimm

     

  • Rosenfeld, North Caucasus

 

  • Rosenheim, Samara, Volga

    2012 Village Report

     

 

  • Rothammel, Saratov, Volga

    2012 Village Report

     

  • Schaffhausen, Samara, Volga
    2012 Village Report

    There were two enquiries during 2011-2012 from Germany and the USA.

     

    In the absence of an official Schaffhausen First Settlers List (FSL)  I have compiled a substitute list  derived from FSLs  of  villages where  settlers wintered prior to establishing the Schaffhausen colony and existing census data. This is not comprehensive as the Schaffhausen 1857 census is incomplete but is the best available until more accurate archive data becomes available.  I intend to publish this list in the  Village handout for the 2013 Annual Conference in an attempt to attract interest from any Schaffhausen descendants that may attend the conference. To date it appears that there are not many Schaffhausen descendants among AHSGR members- hopefully this will prove to be  a misconception !

     

    I attended the 2012 Annual Conference in  Portland and delivered a  paper on the  history of several Schaffhausen families who migrated to Bugulma (east of Samara)  prior to WW1. During the Civil War they fled to China from where they departed in 1940/50 for the USA, Australia and Germany. Research for this paper enabled me to appreciate the extent of German settlement towards the Urals from the original colonies along the Volga and around Samara.

     

    I enjoyed the conference and the opportunity to  meet fellow GR descendants and Village coordinators  who have kindly assisted me the past few years such as Tim Weeder. Special thanks to Bill Pickelhaupt for providing material on Bugulma and the original Schaffhausen church.

     

    During the conference I noticed that many VCs have  established Facebook pages for their villages and  am  considering establishing one  for Schaffhausen to reach  a wider German Russian audience.

     

    Regards

     

    Jim Parsonage

    Brisbane, Australia

    Schaffhausen V.C

     

     
  • Schilling, Samara, Volga

    2012 Village Report

     

 

  • Schilling, Saratov, Volga

    2012 Village Report for Alt-Schilling, Konstantinovka, Schilling, Neu-Schilling I and Neu-Schilling II

     

    Church records available for Alt-Schilling are at the Russian Archive in Engels as follows:  Births 1764-1841, 1842-1878, Register of the Lutheran

    congregation: 1865 - 1931, Family List: 1883, Homeowners list: 1910, 1915, and draft lists covering unknown periods of time.  The archives in Engels only sells reports created from information extracted from these records.

    Reports vary in cost from $200 to $1500 or more, depending on the time period covered and the number of people in the report.  Reports are in Microsoft Word document format, in Russian.

     

    Church records for the two Neu-Schilling villages located south of Krazny-Kut are at the Russian Archives in Saratov, and consist of birth records for 1871-1921, death records for 1901-1921, and a first settlers list. Church records for Konstantinovka are at the Russian Archives in Saratov, and consist of birth records for 1880-1919, death records for 1895-1910, and marriage records for 1895-1908. The archive will create reports and will copy some records for an individual, at $11 per record.

     

    During 2012, I received no information on any reports created by either of the Russian Archives.

     

    During 2012, I had 34 emails with people concerning people from Schilling, and their descendants.  The primary means of communication for things related to Schilling are through a Facebook page, the Schilling website: http://www.schillinggr.org/ , and the Schilling mailing list with instructions at:

    http://lists.rootsweb.ancestry.com/index/intl/RUS/RUS-SARATOV-DOBRINKA.html

     

    http://lists.rootsweb.ancestry.com/index/intl/RUS/RUS-SARATOV-SCHILLING.html

    I continue to receive inquiries from people in Germany and Russia who find me almost exclusively through the Schilling website.  Unfortunately, most people from these countries only have family information for people born in 1910 or later, making it impossible to connect to people 50 years before that time.

     

    During 2012, additions to the Schilling database included tracing families from other villages who married people from Schilling.  I have also added information from The Kulberg Lists (5 or 6 families), which is the only published source of first settler information.  I continue to do extensive research on the descendants of Schilling people who immigrated to the United States and Canada.

     

    Gary Martens

     

    VC for Schilling, Konstantinovka, Neu-Schilling I and Neu-Schilling II

     

 

  • Schlangendorf, Swedish Colonies, Nikolaev and Kherson
    2012 Village Report

     

    The oldest colony of theSwedish Villages, Alt-Schwedendorf was formed in

    1782 with Swedes from an island off Estonia, now called Hiiumaa.  The German colonies included in the Swedish Villages group are Mühlhausendorf formed in 1805 and Klosterdorf and Schlangendorf formed in the 1806.  They are located in the Dneipr River, north of Berislav..  This group of colonies was renamed to its current name Zmiivka.

     

    I have had no inquiries for 2012.

     

    Karen Wright

     

    VC for Swedish Villages, Mühlhausendorf, Klosterdorf, Schlangendorf, Alt-Schwedendorf

     

  • Schönchen, Samara, Volga
    2012 Village Report

     

    While no family queries were received this year from Schoenchen researchers, this was an enjoyable and active year with Schoenchen research.

     

    A number of additions and updates were made to the Schoenchen website this year (www.schoenchen.org).

    Einwandererzentralstelle (EWZ) records page was added in February which lists extractions from the indexes of EWZ microfilms on the odessa.org website of persons from Schoenchen.

     

    We continue to try to identify obituaries of persons born in Schoenchen and have added a few more to our website this year: Nicholei (Nicholas) Werth, Dorothy (Reichert) Kozlowski, Lucy (Ebel) Werth, Frederick Werth, and Joseph Ebel.

     

    A new web  page was added containing two letters written from Schoenchen, Russia, in 1922 to family in Kansas, asking for assistance during the famine.  The page also contains other letters written from other Volga villages during 1922 to family in Ellis and Rush counties in Kansas, as well as other articles from Ellis and Rush county newspapers relating to the famine.

     

    A new page was added attempting to list what records are held by the archives in Samara, Saratov and Engels.

     

    In July, Denise Grau attended the convention in Portland.  Since there were no attendees for the reunion for colonies Schoenchen, Wittman and Luzern, she was welcomed into a colony reunion for Protestant colonies from the same neighborhood as Schoenchen.  At the Area 6 Researchers Round, Bertha Haas, the previous Schoenchen village coordinator was in attendance.

     

    We continue to work with the birth, marriage, and death records that were microfilmed at the Samara archive by the LDS church. Translators for the 1914 baptisms and 1891, 1892, and 1914 deaths are still needed. 

    We continue to add the translated records to our database.

     

    In March, Denise made her first ever research trip to the AHSGR library in Lincoln and provided a copy of the Schoenchen database, the translated BMD records, and an offline copy of the Schoenchen website to AHSGR.

     

    Respectfully submitted,

    Denise Grau and Terri Dann, Co-Village Coordinators for Schoenchen

    (Paninskaya)

     

  • Schöndorf, Samara, Volga

    2012 Village Report


    Schooendorf was founded  in1855 by two groups of settlers.  One  half of the settlers came from Yagodnaya Polyana.  The other half of the  people came from Pobochnoye. Yagodnaya Polyana is considered to be the "Mother  Colony" 

    .Travel back to either mother colony was some 100 miles.   This was usually

    done in the winter wen the family workload permitted and the  Volga River was frozen over.

     

    There has been very little research activity with Schoen\dorf folks this year.  However, I have kept in touch with my friend Otto Felker (Voelker)  in Nuerenberg, Germany.  He is nearly 90 now.  Otto was  15 in  the fall of

    1941 when Stalin ordered all Volga Germans deported.  Otto was  15 and was sent to western Sibeia  He turned 16 on December 25 and was  assigned to the "Trudarmee" to work in the coal mines for 50 years in western  Siberia.  He eventually was released to lighter duties and was permitted  to emigrate to Germany c. 1992.  Otto likes to read, travel,  and  play the piano.  He has written his autobiography in Russin and is working  on translating it into German.

     

    Laurin Wilhelm

    V.C. for Schoendorf

     

     

  • Schönfeld, Samara, Volga

    2012 Village Report

     

    Schoenfeld was founded in 1856 almost entirely by villagers from Pobochnoye.  This location was some 60 mi.ESE of Saratov and 100 miles ESE  of Pobochnoye.  Most of the family visiting that occurred was in the  wintertime, when the family workload permitted and when the Volga River was  frozen over.

     

    Research inquiries this year were light.  Information sought included research on Popp, Stieben and Wilhel'm.

     

    Laurin Wilhelm

    V.C. for Schoenfeld

     

     

  • Schöntal, Samara, Volga

    2012 Village Report

     

    There was no research activity this year on  Schoental.

     

    Laurin Wilhelm

    V.C. for Schoental

     

  • Schuck, Saratov, Volga
    2012 Village Report

    This year I took on the Village of Schuck.

     

    The information for Volmer & Schuck cross lines often.

     

    I've had 2 inquiries

     

    I am reviewing my information, books, censuses, etc to see if there is anything I may have missed

     

    Cathy Hawinkels

     

    Volmer & Schuck VC

     

  • Schulz, Samara, Volga
    2012 Village Report

    Getting the 1850 and 1857 revision lists was a very enlightening and helpful.

     

    I had three requests this year with one being a new member to the AHSGR.

     

    Closing out the year was, for me was the completion of my manuscript called JACOB'S HOUSE. It is a story about The Zitzer family in Schulz from my grandaunt's view point. It describes the interior of their house, the barns, the backyard gardens and much more. Their daily life,  the journey out of Russia, the good times and the not so good ones. It will be published soon.

     

    Fred Zitzer

    Village Coordinator

    Schulz on the Karaman

 
  • Schwab, Saratov, Volga

    2012 Village Report


    This is one of the smaller villages and in the past year I have had only 3 or 4 queries, all of which have been amnswered to the best of my ability.

     

    Not much else to report; I still index obits for SOAR, despite some serious health issues this year.

     

    Rolene Eichman Kiesling

    "Ro"

    VC Schwab

     

  • Schwed, Samara, Volga

    2012 Village Report

     

     

     

  • Seelmann, Samara, Volga

    2012 Village Report

     

     

     

     

     

  • Seewald, Saratov, Volga

    2012 Village Report

 

  • Shcherbakovka, Saratov, Volga

    2012 Village Report

     

    Even though I have had only a few email contacts concerning the village of Shcherbakovka this year, it has been an exciting year as we await new records from the archives in Russia. When Tim Montania died in 2009, he left a generous bequest to pay for information and documentation on Shcherbakovka and the neighboring village of Dreispitz (in the Lower Volga area). A committee was formed and the wheels are turning slowly, but they are in motion.

     

    A big decision was made this summer concerning the genealogy collection of Kathy O’Mally. It’s hard to believe that she has been gone 10 years now. She worked so hard to collect information on all nine villages in the Stephan and Galka parishes (Shcherbakovka, Dobrinka, Dreispitz, Galka, Kraft, Stephan, Mueller, Holstein, and Schwab) in the Lower Volga. She died with little notice and so her husband left the decision up to Rachel Smith, V.C. for Dreispitz and myself as to where to place the collection. After thoroughly combing through all of the collection ourselves, the decision was made in August to donate the collection to the Center for Volga German Studies at Concordia University in Portland, OR. We hope that it will be helpful to many people in the future.

     

    Janet Laubhan Flickinger

    V.C. for Shcherbakovka

     

     

  • Solothurn
    2012 Village Report

    This year I have had a few inquiries for the village of Wittmann/ Solothurn, most of these came from Germany from young people trying to help their older relatives.  My database continues to grow as I now have over 90,000 names on my database, not all from Wittmann/ Solothurn, but from the upper Catholic colonies along the volga. 

     

    Because of my eye surgery last January, my time on the computer, outside from work, was pretty limited during the first half of the year.  I subscribe to the magazine, Volk Auf Dem Weg and monitor the articles, obits and publications from the magazine.  I was lucky this year to find a book, "Das Schicksal" - Der lange Weg nach Solothurn - Wittmann und zuruck. The book was authored by Valentina Sommer.  The book contains a listing of the first settlers, heads of families of 1798/1834, street names, and information on the deportation.  I continue to update my website as new material becomes available, http://www.volgagerman.net/Wittmann.htm.

     

    Kevin Rupp

    VC - Wittmann/Solothurn

     

    Kevin Rupp

    krupp@ruraltel.net

    www.volgagerman.net

    www.germansfromrussia.net

 

 

  • Stahl am Tarlyk, Samara, Volga

    2012 Village Report

    During the past year I received 6 inquiries about people who came from Stahl am Tarlyk.

    I was able to help one of these inquires. All the rest were about people between 1857 (the last census available) and 1900 time period.

    If any other census during this period arises I would be glad to help these inquires.

    The data base has almost 20,000 entries.

    Paul Koehler, Village Coordinator for Stahl am Tarlyk.

     

     

     

  • Strassburg, Samara, Volga

    2012 Village Report

    Surnames for Strassburg: Balzer Bauer Blähm Blehm Breyer Briegemann Busch Clauser Deisner Dieterle Engel Ephraim Geiss Gerlach Graff Günther Heidelbach Heinze Helwer Herdt Klauser Koerbs (Kerbs) Körbs Krispins Lattner Meier Metzler Müller Opfer Rau Repp Sauerwein Schäfer Schlotthauer Schmidt Schmunk Schreiner Schuber Seifert Seigfried Stuertz Stürtz Vogel Völker Wassenmüller Weber   The source list of these Village surnames was the 1857 Census from Brent Mai received in the early part of 2010.

    Strassburg was founded in 1860 along the left bank of the Torgun River as a Lutheran colony. The original resettlers were from the colonies of Galka, Shcherakovka, Kraft, Schwab, Holstein, Dobrinka, Balzar


    Following the 1941 Deportations, the village was known by its Russian name of Romashki which means daisies. 

    Villages in the Lower Volga region were given a fixed amount of land, as described in the History section. Land was divided, and re-divided periodically, among the households and families in the village. By the time the 1850's were reached, the amount of land for each family was so small that families could not grow enough crops to both use as food and sell for income.

    The solution was to found new villages, called daughter colonies, in parts of the Lower Volga region were no villages existed. Most of these villages were on the east side of the Volga River

     With all of the startup activity in establishing a source of information on the villages; I have not been able to post to a standard website. 

    Leland Riffel

    Village Coordinator for Frankreich, Neu-Galka, Strassburg, Neu-Weimar, Alt-Weimar, & Weimar Villages


  • Strassendorf, Samara, Volga

    2012 Village Report

     

     

  • Straub, Samara, Volga

    2012 Village Report

     

    I have had 4 inquiries about Straub this year about these families:

    Schwabenland (2), Winter, and an inquiry from Russia--David.

     

    I have sent for 1874 Family Lists for 5 Warenburg families and was hoping to start getting this information for Straub families also.  Mila Koretnikova said the 1874 Family Lists for Straub were not at the Russian archive.  This leaves a big gap in doing Straub research.  I tried again to see if the 1834 Straub census could be found and it is not at the Engels or Saratov archives.  I asked my researcher if this census was available at the Samara archive but this archive is too far away for him to go there.

     

     

    The only Straub genealogy records that are available now are:  1767 Straub first settler's list, 1798 Straub census,

    1850 Straub census and 1857 Straub census.  There are some early birth records for Straub at the archive.

     

    I am looking for Straub villagers in nearby villages in their census records.  I usually find a few people in every census record.  I have received more obituaries for people from Straub.  I will check nearby village Pleve charts to see if I can find more people from Straub.

  • Streckerau
    2012 Village Report

     

    As no census is available, actually working in STRECKERAU SURNAMES DATABASE PROJECT.  With more than 2000 surnames up today, from 1863-1916 period, many of them confirmed with the original Birth - Death - Marriage original russian record.  I will take a while to create a table with all the info checked. 

     

    Also preparing the summary to inform AHSGR Gedlist to change UC to confirmed surnames-records.*

     

    A more complete information will be included in the annual report, with the differente request received and answered since working as VC.*

    I began my term as Village Coordinator for Streckerau and Marienberg
    Colonies about middle 2012, and this months were enjoyable and active.

    I have had fifteen inquiries for help in research during the eight months
    I have been the village coordinator. And were able to assist these individuals
    with their research by  either furnishing information directly, or referring
    them to another Village  Coordinator.

    The database for both villages increases nearly on a daily basis. Records have been founded and translated.

    For Streckerau:

    Marriages, 1881
    Marriages,  1890
    Births,  1907
    Marriages,  1907
    Births, 1916
    Marriages,  1916
    Deaths, 1916

    For Streckerau, more than 2.000 individual records, different years (1863-1916) are part of the growing database, in absence of an available census.

    Family List (1863-1865) and a Revision List (1875) have been located in Engels Archiv, and we are waiting the answer of the archive about the cost of buying it.

    A Facebook page, “Streckerau, Volga, Russia” is active, with data charged allmost every day.

    For Marienberg, with 1857 census as reference, we are crossing all the data with the different villages of origins census. The actual database has about 1.800 surnames included, with confirmed records (period 1855-1916).

    Though it has not been updated in the last weeks, we have a page www.marvolrus.blogspot.com active.

    1897 census have been located, but the Russian archive authorities, to my request answered they only will provide information of individual records.

    More records for both villages –different years- are being downloaded from Samara Archiv.  This task can be made “on line” and will be translated in the next few months.

    I want to thank the valuable cooperation of all the VC´s for different villages.  That was of great help to my work.  Specially Angela Gartner, Cathy Hawinkels, Sherri Rose, Gary Martens, Jim Osborne, Maggie Hein, Rosemary Larson, Dodie Rotherham and specially Patricia Gayol Windecker. Also to Dennis Zitterfkopg for his help in my firsts contacts with AHSGR.

    JORGE BOHN

    Village Coordinator for Streckerau & Marienberg

     

     

  • Susannental

    2012 Village Report

    I have set up a Facebook page and Facebook group for the Village. 

    I continue to have a web page, List serve and My family page for the village. 

    I have been scouring through the 1940 census, Michigan and Montana Marriages records, WW 2 draft records and obituaries for Port Huron, Michigan and Billings, Montana updating the village families.  The Village data base at this point now includes 7,911 individuals and 3,074 familes.

    I have been searching through the 1857 census for Meinhard, Kind and Susannental trying to connect familes that intermarried.

    A village member journeyed to Susannental this year and another Village member has published a work of Historical fiction on a village family.

    Kerry Thompson
    AHSGR Coordinator for Susannental

 

  • Swedish Colonies, Nikolaev and Kherson
    2012 Village Report

 

 

  • Unterwalden Meinhard, Samara, Volga

    2012 Village Report for Unterwalden/Meinhard

     

     

  • Volhynia
     2012 Village Report

    There were no inquiries for Polish Volhynia in 2012.  I attended the 2012 AHSGR Convention in Portland, Oregon and coordinated the Polish Volhynia area meeting.  A total fo 12 persons attended of which a large number were researching Mennonites in Volhynia.

    Others included beginning and advanced researchers.  I also met with a new researcher on a one to one basis.  Information in the Polish Volhynian Heritage Hall binder was updated.  In August I attended the annual SGGEE Convention in Regina where my AHSGR Polish Volhynian resource information was displayed.

     

    Respectfully submitted,

    Mabel Kiessling 

 

  •  2012 Village Report

     

    This year I corresponded with 7 different individuals regarding information.

     

    And, I am eagerly awaiting the 1857 Volmer census which I should be receiving in the next few months.

     

    I am also reviewing my information to see if there is anything I missed.

     

    Cathy Hawinkels

    Volmer & Schuck VC

     

     

    Spruce Grove, Alberta, Canada


     

     

  • 2012 Village Report

    This has continued to be a very good peerior for the villages of Walter and Walter-Khutor. They are part of the PArish of Frank which includes Kolb, Hussenbach, Frank, and Frank-Khutor. All the VC's are actively sharing information. Tanja Schell has also made many contributions. We all met at the AHSGR Convention in Portland last June. We also had a Reunion dinner at the famous Rheinlander German Restaurant with 75 attending. We honored Doris Evans, the Frank VC who continues to obtain records for us and also Dr. Richard Scheuerman who made important contacts  and also Tanja Schell for her continued research and beautiful pictures both she and her friend Vladimir Krainov took of our villages.

    Our CD on the History of Walter and Walter-Khutor continues to raise money which is repaying for our Church records. More records have been ordered and new sources from other VC's keep coming in.

    VC Mary Mills continues to add to the Walter database which is at nearly 46,000 records. When the next block of church records for Walter are proofed - Mary will be organizing and combining them.  She also answers queries.

    VC Michael  Fyler maintains our Walter Facebook page and also has the database available. He continues to encourage people to send queries and had about 20 this year - 9 off of Facebook. He may be going to Russia this year.

    VC Jean Roth - as Walter Historian my project for 2013 is to continue to identify villages of origin in Germany. We have about 3/4 of the First Settlers List noted. My plans are to spend 2 weeks in Salt Lake City this May looking at various books and German church records hoping to add to the list. Then in August - I will be spending 3 weeks in Hesse Germany photographing as many of these villages that I can. Then I will be going to Russia and plan to visit Walter and Walter-Khutor. I

    Michael and I went to the Portland Convention and made many contact. Jean has made several trips down to the Center for Volga German Studies at Concordia University in Portland to do research.  

    Submitted by
    Jean A. Roth VC
    Seattle, WA
    jeanaroth@juno.com




  •  2012 Village Report

    This has continued to be a very good peerior for the villages of Walter and Walter-Khutor. They are part of the PArish of Frank which includes Kolb, Hussenbach, Frank, and Frank-Khutor. All the VC's are actively sharing information. Tanja Schell has also made many contributions. We all met at the AHSGR Convention in Portland last June. We also had a Reunion dinner at the famous Rheinlander German Restaurant with 75 attending. We honored Doris Evans, the Frank VC who continues to obtain records for us and also Dr. Richard Scheuerman who made important contacts  and also Tanja Schell for her continued research and beautiful pictures both she and her friend Vladimir Krainov took of our villages.

    Our CD on the History of Walter and Walter-Khutor continues to raise money which is repaying for our Church records. More records have been ordered and new sources from other VC's keep coming in.

    VC Mary Mills continues to add to the Walter database which is at nearly 46,000 records. When the next block of church records for Walter are proofed - Mary will be organizing and combining them.  She also answers queries.

    VC Michael  Fyler maintains our Walter Facebook page and also has the database available. He continues to encourage people to send queries and had about 20 this year - 9 off of Facebook. He may be going to Russia this year.

    VC Jean Roth - as Walter Historian my project for 2013 is to continue to identify villages of origin in Germany. We have about 3/4 of the First Settlers List noted. My plans are to spend 2 weeks in Salt Lake City this May looking at various books and German church records hoping to add to the list. Then in August - I will be spending 3 weeks in Hesse Germany photographing as many of these villages that I can. Then I will be going to Russia and plan to visit Walter and Walter-Khutor. I

    Michael and I went to the Portland Convention and made many contact. Jean has made several trips down to the Center for Volga German Studies at Concordia University in Portland to do research.  

    Submitted by
    Jean A. Roth VC
    Seattle, WA
    jeanaroth@juno.com

     

     

  • Warenburg, Samara, Volga

    2012 Village Report

     

    by Sharon White

     

    I have had the following inquiries about Warenburg this year:  Stumpf, Schutz, Gobel, Hartwig, Bier and Kinzel.

     

    I have been able to get more 1874 Warenburg Family Lists for these families this year:  Boos, Eisner, Funkner.

    I have paid the initial deposit to get the Constanz Family List information--just waiting for the archive to get the research done--the final cost is determined by how many pages they type.  The Family Lists have birth dates and death dates, some maiden names, if the family left the village, and some information when military service started and ended.  Even though it is an 1874 Family List, there is information on it until 1885 in some cases.

     

    The Family LIsts for 1874 have more information than the census records.

    I have had help paying for these records.  My cousin, Jake Leisle, has helped me translate all of these Family Lists from the Russian and we have saved a lot of money by doing the translations ourselves.  The Boos Family List information I got was 3 pages. The Eisner was 12 pages.  The Funkner was 9 pages.

    In 2011, I got the Schiffman Family List and it was 4 pages.  Jake Leisle got the 1874 Family Lists for his Bier and Leisle Warenburg families.  Soon we will have 7 of the Warenburg families done.  In 1857 there were about 70 family surnames in Warenburg, so there are still a lot more families to be done.

     

    I am making a list of people who will help with other Warenburg surnames.  I plan to keep doing this for as many families as I can.

     

    I have asked Mila Koretnikova if there are these records are available for 1874 for my other villages:  Straub, Laub and Dinkel.  Mila checked and these Family Lists are not at the archive.  We are very lucky that these records exist for Warenburg.

     

    I continue to get photos, and other documents of people who were from Warenburg.

     

     

  • Weimar
    2012 Village Report

    The following 2012 Surnames were researched  for ancestry connections: Bauer Fox Garlack Gerlock Maier Meyer Miller Moore Rusch Scheidt Schmidt Schneider Weimer 

    Surnames for Weimer: Bauer Bischoff Fass Flath Fox Garlack Gerlock Graf Gross Heffel Heinze Kerbs Krenz Maier Meyer Miller Moore or Mohr Neiwert Neiwirth Neuwerth Rusch Scheidt Schmidt Schneider Spindler Utz Weichhold Weimer  The source list of these Village surnames was the 1857 Census from Brent Mai received in the early part of 2010.

    The 2010 AHSGR Convention had an informative  display  on the origination  of the Village of Weimar. http://www.ahsgr.org/Villages/inventory/avfi-w.htm#WEIMARS

    History and description of Weimar parish, Papers proving German Heritage of Gregor Salzmann. Dated 19 November 1938

    Villages in the Lower Volga region were given a fixed amount of land, as described in the History section. Land was divided, and re-divided periodically, among the households and families in the village. By the time the 1850's were reached, the amount of land for each family was so small that families could not grow enough crops to both use as food and sell for income.

    The solution was to found new villages, called daughter colonies, in parts of the Lower Volga region were no villages existed. Most of these villages were on the east side of the Volga River.

    With all of the startup activity in establishing a source of information on the villages; I have not been able to post to a standard website. 
     
    Leland Riffel

    Village Coordinator for  Frankreich, Neu-Galka, Strassburg, Neu-Weimar, Alt-Weimar, & Weimar  Villages

     

  • Wiesenmüller, Samara, Volga

    2012 Village Report

     

    I took over as VC of the daughter colony of Wiesenmueller in September 2012.

    I started by familiarizing myself with the village, and the people who were the first settlers in Wiesenmueller from Franzosen, Moor, Grimm, Galka, Shcherbakovka, Stephan, Müller, Schwab and Holstein.  The people of the last 6 villages were familiar because of connections to people Dobrinka and Galka, which I am VC for.

     

    Church records for the Lutheran church in Wiesenmueller are located in three Russian Archives as follows:  Engels (Family list: 1895, 1914), Volgograd

    (Births:  1914, Marriages:  1894, 1895), Saratov (unknown).

     

    I have been reviewing records in the Wiesenmueller database I received from the previous VC.  I have been adding additional ancestor and descendants’information for people with Wiesenmueller connections.  Some records came from census for the Volga region villages and church records for Galka, Shcherbakovka, Dobrinka and Holstein.  For people that immigrated to the US, I have been adding additional genealogy information found in all US Census, including 1940.  Information found in the articles/obituaries from 6100 newspapers in Genealogybank.com, obituaries found on SOAR, and burial information found in Findagrave.com and several other online resources is being recorded.  Events found in obituaries and other sources are accurately recorded in the databases maintained by The Master Genealogist.

     

    Many people from Wiesenmueller immigrated to the United States, to Oklahoma (Harper County), Kansas (Marion, Barton, Rush and Russell counties), Colorado (Otereo, Larimer and Weld counties) and Michigan (Bay, Saginaw and surrounding counties).  Others can be found in Nebraska, Idaho, Oregon, Washington, New Mexico and California.  The Wiesenmueller database also includes people from the village who were displaced to Kazakhstan and Siberia.  The ancestors of people immigrating from Russia are traced back as far as possible using available census documents.

     

    Since becoming VC, I have received no inquires since my name was added as VC on the AHSGR website.  From Jan. 2012 thru Aug. 2012, the previous VC for this village (Hugh Lichtenwald)  received 74 emails exchanged relating to Wiesenmueller research.

     

    In the near future I will be setting up a mailing list for Wiesenmueller and a web page at  <http://www.wiesenmueller.org/> http://www.wiesenmueller.org/

     

    Gary Martens

    Wiesenmueller VC

     

     


  • Wittman (Soloturn), Samara, Volga

    2012 Village Report

     

    This year I have had a few inquiries for the village of Wittmann/ Solothurn, most of these came from Germany from young people trying to help their older relatives.  My database continues to grow as I now have over 90,000 names on my database, not all from Wittmann/ Solothurn, but from the upper Catholic colonies along the volga.

     

    Because of my eye surgery last January, my time on the computer, outside from work, was pretty limited during the first half of the year.  I subscribe to the magazine, Volk Auf Dem Weg and monitor the articles, obits and publications from the magazine.  I was lucky this year to find a book, "Das Schicksal" - Der lange Weg nach Solothurn - Wittmann und zuruck. The book was authored by Valentina Sommer.  The book contains a listing of the first settlers, heads of families of 1798/1834, street names, and information on the deportation.  I continue to update my website as new material becomes available, http://www.volgagerman.net/Wittmann.htm.

     

    Kevin Rupp

    VC - Wittmann/Solothurn

     

    Kevin Rupp

    krupp@ruraltel.net

    www.volgagerman.net

    www.germansfromrussia.ne

     

  • Worms, Berezan, Odessa, Kherson

     

  •  2012 Village Report

    This year has been filled with requests for assistance in locating information and the availability of the village newsletter.  Requests have come from Canada, the United States as well as from Germany.  The requests seemed to come in waves and often were about the same surname, which made it very interesting indeed. 

    To date I have sent out 4 newsletters and will try and have a Christmas edition ready before the end of the year.  Since there have been so many obituaries in the last few years I have split the newsletters into two – one for general information and one simply for obituaries.  This has worked well and I have had some positive comments on the new reporting.

    The 2012 convention in Portland was well attended by YP descendants and we had a great reunion on the Thursday night with Dr. Richard Scheuerman sharing some of his most interesting stories.  The second gathering was the scheduled Area 9 meeting on Saturday where once again we had good conversation and there may have even been a couple of “ah ha” moments.

    The YP Facebook page has blossomed and to date has 95 "likes".  A few people have reached out in their search for relatives and hopefully they have found some useful information.  It is a good way to communicate information quickly.

    In September of 2013, Dr. Richard Scheuerman will be hosting a tour to Germany and Russia in celebration of the 250th anniversary of Catherine the Great’s manifesto.  It promises to be a great trip and Richard assures me there will be an opportunity to take a side trip to Yagodnaya Polyana.

    We have a begun a new village project which should take quite some time completing it.  The goal is to get as many pictures as we can of ancestors who were born in Yagodnaya Polyana and include them in a family tree photo book.  The criteria to be used:  must be born in YP, and their birth and death dates must also be identified.  If known, we will include marriage date (if married), parents names and year they left Russia.

    Marlene Michel
    Village
    Coordinator for Yagodnaya Polyana

     

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  • Zurich, (aka Eckardt), Samara, Volga

    2012 Village Report

    (a.k.a. Eckardt)

     

    ZÜRICH / ZUERICH (a.k.a. ECKARDT), SAMARA, VOLGA

     

    I received only a few inquiries for Zürich this past year, and was able to give some limited information in these cases.

     

    I continue to add to my database, and ever so slowly it grows. More to come...

     

    Respectfully submitted,

     

    Keith Wilberg